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Old 12-19-2016, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,690 posts, read 8,756,192 times
Reputation: 7304

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Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
Ahahahahah....ever been in Humboldt county Nat??

Again...it is always the hyperbole that gets in the way talking to you.....and, by the way, being remote is not a quality per se......sure Canada has places more remote to reach than the California coast...does not mean it cannot be as pristine....
Yes I've been. I know Eureka fairly well, and have driven that part of the coast several times, then inland on the 101. Certainly it is not LA, but I've never seen it as totally pristine, at least not as pristine as places in B.C.

Remoteness and pristine are linked.

 
Old 12-19-2016, 03:42 PM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,072,511 times
Reputation: 1256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Before the US changed the rules and Canadians needed a passport to enter the US, Canadians still per capita held more passports than Americans. Much more.
Again......to enjoy a simple tropical vacation a Canadian either had the US or somewhere else where he/she needed a passport....so even before the change of rule there was more incentive for a Canadian to get a passport....still it was a foreign contry for her/him, changing of currency, etc...

I know quite few Canadians and, obviously, Americans....personally I have not noticed any discernible difference in international traveling behavior (average people, making good income).

The notion that your Canadian working stiff at London Drugs is more of a world traveler than his/her counterpart working at Safeway is laughable in my book.

Quote:
To say it's simply because we have more immigrants is silly. Canadians have, do and perhaps always will travel more than the average American.

Is not silly....is very real.....and consider that many immigrants in the US are actually on working vissa that in a lot of cases never turn into Green Card...so they travel but they do not get US passports.
 
Old 12-19-2016, 03:44 PM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,072,511 times
Reputation: 1256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Yes I've been. I know Eureka fairly well, and have driven that part of the coast several times, then inland on the 101. Certainly it is not LA, but I've never seen it as totally pristine, at least not as pristine as places in B.C.

Look better next time...they are as pristine as the places you can reach by car in a highway in BC....

Quote:
Remoteness and pristine are linked.
Not necessarily.....in order to be pristine you need a good amount of remoteness yes...which can be found in the North California coast.
 
Old 12-19-2016, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,538,583 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I'd like to know how the average temperature of the water at the Manitoba great lakes beaches in mid summer compares to that of a place like Venice Beach, CA. I betcha it's close!
Here you go. The beaches are searchable. Water Temperature - Grand Beach, Canada
 
Old 12-19-2016, 04:38 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,839 posts, read 18,861,423 times
Reputation: 33746
My husband spent three years (WINTERS) working in Winnipeg. He does not want to move there.

But couldn't we moderates/liberals move to some place like Nova Scotia? The two of us are retired, we wouldn't cause any trouble/don't do drugs, would buy stuff from the locals, would encourage our American friends to come up and visit us, thereby supporting the new catamaran ferry service that the province is still paying for after the first one failed.

We might be able to offer something in return if you people would take in some American refugees--we have Cape Cod (where so many Canadian licence plates do not go unnoticed), we have Boston (for what it's worth...but it does have some great museums), we have strict gun control (just be careful if you have to drive through New Hampshire to get here), we have Plymouth where the Pilgrims lived (Mayflower II is in dry dock but that's because it has to be ready for the 400th anniversary and maybe you could get free tickets), there are great hospitals in Boston (if you can afford them and need something done fast).

Hockey is played here. Free tickets maybe? Best seats in the house?

Except for New Hampshire, New England might be well absorbed into Canada. You'd also get great skiing in Vermont and most of our campgrounds are pretty good. For those of you living in Ontario or Quebec, a lot of us are related anyway if you go back far enough.

This country has been going down hill and now the end is nigh. I didn't vote for the orange monster and have paid into the system all my life--I don't think we older folk should have to live out the rest of our lives in fear. And for anyone who says retirees are all set--no, we are not. Only the RICH retirees are all set. I'd like a small place in Nova Scotia where we could spend our measly pensions into the Canadian economy. (And we learned all the words to O Canada back in our school days. Hope that counts for something. I know that it's gender neutral now, lol. )
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Old 12-19-2016, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,520 posts, read 20,905,707 times
Reputation: 13856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
"All"? Really?
Okay. Most, then.
 
Old 12-19-2016, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,108,669 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerbilzak View Post
Do you think Canada/Canadians would like such a plan?


Those Democratic states above have 96,716,379 people. They would contribute nearly 3/4ths of this "new country's" GDP, would have more than 4/5ths of the Global 2000 companies, would have 9/10ths of the best universities, the best weather (forests, palm trees, beaches, mountains, deserts), higher GDP per capita and lower household debt (and no housing bubble on the horizon). What do they get by joining Canada, a country with high debt, bad weather, high cost of living, and a housing bubble on the horizon?

Not to mention they'd have to adopt the Queen as their Head of State, a woman whose sole claim to power is being gifted extreme wealth. Americans value meritocracy not aristocratic heredity. We value picking oneself up by the bootstraps, not worshipping a family of inbred royals with overbites.

Canada's a definite upgrade over Mississippi and Alabama. But joining with Canada is still an economic downgrade over those Blue States going it alone.
 
Old 12-19-2016, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,520 posts, read 20,905,707 times
Reputation: 13856
Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post

Those Democratic states above have 96,716,379 people. They would contribute nearly 3/4ths of this "new country's" GDP, would have more than 4/5ths of the Global 2000 companies, would have 9/10ths of the best universities, the best weather (forests, palm trees, beaches, mountains, deserts), higher GDP per capita and lower household debt (and no housing bubble on the horizon). What do they get by joining Canada, a country with high debt, bad weather, high cost of living, and a housing bubble on the horizon?

Not to mention they'd have to adopt the Queen as their Head of State, a woman whose sole claim to power is being gifted extreme wealth. Americans value meritocracy not aristocratic heredity. We value picking oneself up by the bootstraps, not worshipping a family of inbred royals with overbites.
Ah. I was waiting for the voice of reason.

I'm still waiting.
 
Old 12-19-2016, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,108,669 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slate Moonstone View Post
Um, I don't mean to be dense, but what exactly are these "issues" you're talking about? I mean, obviously Canada isn't perfect - no place is - but things are going pretty well there. The country is one of the safest in the world, inequality is far better than in most Western countries, the health care system works well by and large, macroeconomic management is solid, the economy is recovering from the oil slump, the threat of Quebec separatism seems to have died out... I'm struggling to see what the major problems are.




Yeah, US whites have basically voted to destroy the country rather than share it with nonwhites. That shouldn't have been a surprise to me - I mean, the whites abandoned the cities and let them collapse - but I naively believed the country had progressed a lot. Obviously, I was wrong.
1. Ontario's debt is through the roof
2. Household debt in Canada is among the world's highest
3. Canada has been losing full-time jobs for months now (and all it adds are low-wage part-time service jobs)
4. The level of immigration (460k) is really high, especially without corresponding economic growth
5. The housing bubble is teetering
6. Once the U.S. Fed keeps raising interest rates, the Loonie will crash further making imports even worse off
7. Oil will never reach the peak of the 2000s, hindering economic growth going forward
8. Canada has very low innovation for a Western country (Dutch disease?). The last best thing Canada produced - Blackberry - is nearing bankruptcy. Bombardier is next in line.
9. First Nations people are still subject to a lot of racism (Highway of Tears anyone?)
10. Cost of living is exorbitant
11. Your telecommunications companies are even more predatory than American ones
12. Your airline companies are rapaciously greedy and flying from Canada is very expensive
13. Canadian unemployment is much higher than that of the U.S.
14. Macroeconomic fundamentals are very worrying
15. No major world-class companies, and all Canadians idolize Tim Hortons as some mega company. But all Americans who've tried it thinks it's gross, which is why the company struggles outside Canada

By the way, the Democratic candidate won 2.8 million more votes than the Republican candidate. And that's after 8 years of Democratic rule at The White House. The Democrats have won more votes in 6 of the past 7 elections. The U.S. isn't as regressive as you think. Lay off the CBC for a while.
 
Old 12-19-2016, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,690 posts, read 8,756,192 times
Reputation: 7304
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
My husband spent three years (WINTERS) working in Winnipeg. He does not want to move there.

But couldn't we moderates/liberals move to some place like Nova Scotia? The two of us are retired, we wouldn't cause any trouble/don't do drugs, would buy stuff from the locals, would encourage our American friends to come up and visit us, thereby supporting the new catamaran ferry service that the province is still paying for after the first one failed.

We might be able to offer something in return if you people would take in some American refugees--we have Cape Cod (where so many Canadian licence plates do not go unnoticed), we have Boston (for what it's worth...but it does have some great museums), we have strict gun control (just be careful if you have to drive through New Hampshire to get here), we have Plymouth where the Pilgrims lived (Mayflower II is in dry dock but that's because it has to be ready for the 400th anniversary and maybe you could get free tickets), there are great hospitals in Boston (if you can afford them and need something done fast).

Hockey is played here. Free tickets maybe? Best seats in the house?

Except for New Hampshire, New England might be well absorbed into Canada. You'd also get great skiing in Vermont and most of our campgrounds are pretty good. For those of you living in Ontario or Quebec, a lot of us are related anyway if you go back far enough.

This country has been going down hill and now the end is nigh. I didn't vote for the orange monster and have paid into the system all my life--I don't think we older folk should have to live out the rest of our lives in fear. And for anyone who says retirees are all set--no, we are not. Only the RICH retirees are all set. I'd like a small place in Nova Scotia where we could spend our measly pensions into the Canadian economy. (And we learned all the words to O Canada back in our school days. Hope that counts for something. I know that it's gender neutral now, lol. )
You and your husband sound like lovely people. Unfortunately we older folks are not wanted in most countries as new immigrants....I wonder....maybe get your kids ( if you have some )to immigrate and then have them sponsor mum and dad to join them.
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