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Old 02-03-2017, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,428,839 times
Reputation: 6148

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
LOL. This post is hilarious. A stranger from another country with 10 times the population and wealth of Canada is trying to shame Canada into meeting the standards he thinks should be in place so he can be a tourist and go look at polar bears.

For your information Canada has built the infrastructure it's currently capable of that is affordable and appropriate enough to the population of Canada. You can get back to us about Canada's infrastructure when Canada has a population and wealth 10 times what it is now.

LOL.

.
Glad I provided comedic relief to you but that was not my intent

My point was that providing roads would be a better investment for the North than subsidizing cheese, for instance.

Once the path for a road is cleared and a road constructed, it is there for good. Sure there is resurfacing every 5 years but that is a fraction of the initial cost. Subsidizing cheese would be a recurring cost, as would any food aid. Moving people to a climate and culture that they don't understand would be disastrous as well...
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Old 02-03-2017, 11:40 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,244 posts, read 6,585,166 times
Reputation: 14232
Quote:

Once the path for a road is cleared and a road constructed, it is there for good. Sure there is resurfacing every 5 years but that is a fraction of the initial cost.
That's not how it works in the north. You live in Texas, right? Have you ever lived in the north? What you have in mind might work in Texas where the ground is dry and solid and you don't have hundreds of miles of sucking muskeg and erupting frost boils that can turn into sink holes big enough to make a truck sink out of sight beneath the mud. I think before you jump to conclusions about how easily roads can be built in the north it may be worth your while to do some proper research about the expense and what's entailed in the building and maintaining of roads in the north.

.
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Old 02-04-2017, 02:47 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,487,494 times
Reputation: 4657
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Glad I provided comedic relief to you but that was not my intent

My point was that providing roads would be a better investment for the North than subsidizing cheese, for instance.

Once the path for a road is cleared and a road constructed, it is there for good. Sure there is resurfacing every 5 years but that is a fraction of the initial cost. Subsidizing cheese would be a recurring cost, as would any food aid. Moving people to a climate and culture that they don't understand would be disastrous as well...
I was stunned to learn how much money is given to First Nation annually to assist with community, education, social responsibility, and investigations ... all autonomously managed money. Harper looked into accountability and was making adjustments. Trudeau swept in with the "We Love You" message, and 'let's settle it with more money'.

I'm pretty sure I'm missing something here ... but here goes

First Nation people are the original settlers in Canada. They want to preserve their culture. They want to live on ancestral lands and they know how to live on that land ... like their ancestors. I wonder why it is suddenly too expensive for the descendants of these ancestral lands to live? Their ancestors didn't need the supermarket. Next we hear that the reason ancestral traditions, like beading (I suppose), have been lost is because the colonists wouldn't allow it. Yet, enough of the culture is preserved to define it.

More money means what?
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Old 02-04-2017, 06:33 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,265 posts, read 4,504,148 times
Reputation: 5613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I was stunned to learn how much money is given to First Nation annually to assist with community, education, social responsibility, and investigations ... all autonomously managed money. Harper looked into accountability and was making adjustments. Trudeau swept in with the "We Love You" message, and 'let's settle it with more money'.

I'm pretty sure I'm missing something here ... but here goes

First Nation people are the original settlers in Canada. They want to preserve their culture. They want to live on ancestral lands and they know how to live on that land ... like their ancestors. I wonder why it is suddenly too expensive for the descendants of these ancestral lands to live? Their ancestors didn't need the supermarket. Next we hear that the reason ancestral traditions, like beading (I suppose), have been lost is because the colonists wouldn't allow it. Yet, enough of the culture is preserved to define it.

More money means what?
I agree that they need money, but it ranges from slightly mismanaged to grossly mismanaged.
Depends on the chief. Not easy to fix either, unfortunately.
Because, you're right it IS a lot of money.

Part of the problem is a lot of reserves are in remote areas where there is not much to do.
With today's technology...ie. computers, should be able to set something online.
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,428,839 times
Reputation: 6148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
That's not how it works in the north. You live in Texas, right? Have you ever lived in the north? What you have in mind might work in Texas where the ground is dry and solid and you don't have hundreds of miles of sucking muskeg and erupting frost boils that can turn into sink holes big enough to make a truck sink out of sight beneath the mud. I think before you jump to conclusions about how easily roads can be built in the north it may be worth your while to do some proper research about the expense and what's entailed in the building and maintaining of roads in the north.

.
First off, isn't a lot of the North the "Canadian Shield"? That is solid bedrock at the surface. That can be managed by blasting. The muskeg areas have, in general a lower population. The only city where you'd need to worry about it is Churchill. But there already exists a railroad there. Simply have a road right along the railroad, problem solved. I assume the railway company maintains the railroad, so simply pay them more to maintain an all weather road along side that. It ain't rocket science...

I do live in Texas but I'm from a state, Louisiana, that has very swampy/marshy topography. In Louisiana, if you simply place down a road in the marshes, it will gradually sink. So what they do is either elevate the road (costly) which they do for main highways and interstates, or they simply do "pile driving". What you can basically do on the cheap is first clear the land down to a deeper level, then drive creosote telephone poles (the creosote preserves it) into the mud and space them ever so often. Then, you add a solid gravel base. Finally, you add asphalt. The asphalt will need to be replaced every 5 years.

It can be done.
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,428,839 times
Reputation: 6148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I was stunned to learn how much money is given to First Nation annually to assist with community, education, social responsibility, and investigations ... all autonomously managed money. Harper looked into accountability and was making adjustments. Trudeau swept in with the "We Love You" message, and 'let's settle it with more money'.

I'm pretty sure I'm missing something here ... but here goes

First Nation people are the original settlers in Canada. They want to preserve their culture. They want to live on ancestral lands and they know how to live on that land ... like their ancestors. I wonder why it is suddenly too expensive for the descendants of these ancestral lands to live? Their ancestors didn't need the supermarket. Next we hear that the reason ancestral traditions, like beading (I suppose), have been lost is because the colonists wouldn't allow it. Yet, enough of the culture is preserved to define it.

More money means what?
Imagine if all that money were spent on improving infrastructure up there instead of pumping money into social programs? There would probably be a decent road network up there by now...
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Old 02-04-2017, 08:01 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,265,341 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Imagine if all that money were spent on improving infrastructure up there instead of pumping money into social programs? There would probably be a decent road network up there by now...
social programs help people. Those imaginary roads, I am not so sure... Even southern Ontario is not fully developed, why rush the great north?
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Old 02-04-2017, 08:35 AM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,278,774 times
Reputation: 6512
Yeah okay, let's divert food subsidy and northern allowances for physicians, nurses, and the like - and build a road to the biggest northern town, Iqaluit connecting it as a major hub or, at least, a road into Churchill so that tourists can gawk at the polar bears wandering in to feed off the garbage during starvation months.

How many of us actually live up north? lol. I do!!!
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Old 02-04-2017, 08:42 AM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,278,774 times
Reputation: 6512
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
My point was that providing roads would be a better investment for the North than subsidizing cheese, for instance.
cBach, with respect, you are applying a very American perspective to the social structure and history of a different country. I live in the north. Canadians are not going to invest in transport at the expense of already-malnutritioned northern populations. It'd be like me walking around the reddest areas of Texas and proclaiming that an investment of universal healthcare for all, including the "undocumented", would serve everyone better in the future. It just sounds that nutty.
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Old 02-04-2017, 12:43 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,132 posts, read 11,884,692 times
Reputation: 4428
I can kind of see cBach's point. There may be more up front costs but over the long run, it would be better for everyone to make the cost of living cheaper for those in the north. That is one of the big reasons why there is so much malnutrition in the north is because the cost of food is too high and people can't afford a balanced diet.
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