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Old 01-22-2017, 07:12 PM
 
6,405 posts, read 3,514,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I'm talking about beers in the 1970's through to late 80's

Macro brews were about all you could get with a few exceptions.
And Brador was about the highest alcohol content you could get before the ice beers came in the late 80's...
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Old 01-22-2017, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I'm talking about beers in the 1970's through to late 80's

Macro brews were about all you could get with a few exceptions.
Very few exceptions. In Ontario, you could only buy imported beer through the LCBO--imports weren't available at the Brewer's Retail in those days, and by "imports," I mean "beer from outside both Canada and Ontario." Since the vast majority of Ontario beer drinkers bought beet at Brewer's Retail, and it only sold Ontario beer, Ontario beer drinkers were stuck with macros' lagers, and ales that looked and tasted like lagers.

Yet there was tremendous brand loyalty, mostly shaped by lifestyle advertising. Molson Export Ale was for the hard-working, blue-collar guys who liked to fix cars in their spare time; Labatt Blue and Molson Golden were for the twenty-somethings who might eventually graduate to Labatt 50 (or, if Labatt's prayers were answered, Labatt IPA); Cool Spring, at only 3.2% abv, was a true light beer for those who wanted a beer without having to feel the effects. Molson Canadian was definitely for the 18 to 25 demographic (the age in Ontario in those days was 18, and Molson did its best to market Canadian as a beer for the beginning drinker).

You drank the beer whose advertising matched your lifestyle. If someone offered you a beer that wasn't your brand, you still accepted it, because in the end, they all pretty much looked and tasted the same; and hey, it's a free beer.
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
And Brador was about the highest alcohol content you could get before the ice beers came in the late 80's...
If I remember correctly, Brador wasn't available in BC. Could be wrong. I do remember the first time I saw it was when working on VIA Rail

Old Vienna as well was one I don't remember seeing around in B.C. Again not sure if it was just not in my sights.

The beer of choice for higher alcohol content for us in BC was Extra Old Stock. It's 5.65, lower than Brador's 6.
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,704 posts, read 8,786,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Very few exceptions. In Ontario, you could only buy imported beer through the LCBO--imports weren't available at the Brewer's Retail in those days, and by "imports," I mean "beer from outside both Canada and Ontario." Since the vast majority of Ontario beer drinkers bought beet at Brewer's Retail, and it only sold Ontario beer, Ontario beer drinkers were stuck with macros' lagers, and ales that looked and tasted like lagers.

Yet there was tremendous brand loyalty, mostly shaped by lifestyle advertising. Molson Export Ale was for the hard-working, blue-collar guys who liked to fix cars in their spare time; Labatt Blue and Molson Golden were for the twenty-somethings who might eventually graduate to Labatt 50 (or, if Labatt's prayers were answered, Labatt IPA); Cool Spring, at only 3.2% abv, was a true light beer for those who wanted a beer without having to feel the effects. Molson Canadian was definitely for the 18 to 25 demographic (the age in Ontario in those days was 18, and Molson did its best to market Canadian as a beer for the beginning drinker).

You drank the beer whose advertising matched your lifestyle. If someone offered you a beer that wasn't your brand, you still accepted it, because in the end, they all pretty much looked and tasted the same; and hey, it's a free beer.
I would HOPE so
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,182 posts, read 1,759,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I would HOPE so
I remember helping a buddy out with moving stuff to his cousin's. When we were done, Buddy's Cousin offered us a beer. It was Old Vienna. Blech, yuck, argh. But hey, we were polite, and it's free beer. Naturally, we drank it; then went back to Buddy's place, where there was a stock of Molson Ex.

Then, with Molson Ex in hand, we went out to work on Buddy's car. Like all Ex drinkers did on Saturday afternoons.

ETA: Buddy's car was a 1975 Ford Torino, with a 351 Cleveland engine. I don't know if our tinkering improved performance, but man, did we have a lot of fun in that thing! It was the "Starsky and Hutch" car, just with a different paint job. Imagine cruising Yonge Street in something like that--well, I did!

Last edited by ChevySpoons; 01-23-2017 at 12:54 AM..
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Old 01-23-2017, 09:19 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,541 posts, read 17,783,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I thought dark beer would be more popular in Canada than the US. A heavier beer for colder climates.
For comparison, Scandinavians (cold by reputation) tend to strongly prefer very pale pilsners. Often as low as 2% alcohol. It gives new meaning to the old 'sex in a canoe' aphorism, 'f*ing close to water'.

But then they do have a juleøl (Yule ale/beer) tradition where doppelbock styles (very heavy, sweet, dark beers) are consumed around Christmastime.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
I didn't turn 21 that long ago so I don't know how beers were in the early 2000's of course but when I go out, I see plenty of beers with at least 6% ABW down there.
American beers are very rarely measure in ABW anymore. ABW still shows up in legal codes, but breweries, advertising , and labeling have been ABV for decades. That said it is possible that you live in a state where some arcane law requires alcohol to be listed in ABW. I don't know specifically whether that is tue in PA, but it wouldn't surprise me since PA has some of the weirdest alcohol laws in the country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I've seen American beers' alcohol level measured by ABV.
Indeed. I worked in the brewing industry for over 10 years and the only place I have seen ABW used is in dusty old manuals.
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Old 01-23-2017, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Toronto
332 posts, read 73,559 times
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Canadian beer seems in general more 'stronger' which I can see why. Most Canadians drink in a bar, bbqs (special events) or at home. It's cold most of the time so you need something harsher and its consumed in a shorter period of time.

But a good portion of the US is in hotter climates where outdoor focused living is much more common. Comparatively, in Canada, when I'm doing 'long-haul' activities like camping, cottaging, smoking/real bbqing where I'm drinking earlier and for longer periods, I much prefer the light beer. Save the stronger stuff for the evening/before bed.

Also, mixed drinks (whiskey and coke, gin and tonic, long island iced tea), the Canadian stuff is like water compared to the US where you get 2-3x the amount. Even taking regular shots at bars, it shames what Canada has to offer.
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Old 01-23-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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He's back.
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Old 04-06-2017, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Is Carling popular in Canada?
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Old 04-06-2017, 11:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Is Carling popular in Canada?
Cant speak for the rest of the country but its not popular here in Quebec
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