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View Poll Results: How do you feel?
POSITIVE - Thats so fascinating; I wonder what they could be doing here! 12 24.00%
NEUTRAL - Doesn't really think anything of it. 30 60.00%
NEGATIVE - America's govt causes too much problems in the world 8 16.00%
Voters: 50. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-20-2019, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,179 posts, read 1,757,065 times
Reputation: 2652

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
I saw a car with Alberta plates on a cloudy winter day in front of my house in Houston. I knew they were lost and were looking at their phone/GPS/map before turning back, since I live at the entrance of the subdivision. I was just surprised that there were Western Canadians who drove their car all the way from Calgary or Edmonton and across the United States to my house.
Why not? Canadians like long car trips too, and we're quite capable of getting lost. Heck, my ex and I once enjoyed a car trip from Toronto to Denver, and Toronto to Halifax; and I've driven from Alberta to Toronto (and back) numerous times. We got lost on occasion, but it simply meant that we saw places and met people we otherwise might not have encountered. Great experiences!
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Old 06-21-2019, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,553 posts, read 9,431,995 times
Reputation: 6719
How do you feel when you encounter an American? With your hands?
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Old 06-21-2019, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,701 posts, read 8,775,044 times
Reputation: 7314
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
I saw a car with Alberta plates on a cloudy winter day in front of my house in Houston. I knew they were lost and were looking at their phone/GPS/map before turning back, since I live at the entrance of the subdivision. I was just surprised that there were Western Canadians who drove their car all the way from Calgary or Edmonton and across the United States to my house.
In Vancouver I see plates from all over the US. Mainly the western states, but the occasional New Jersey, New York and even Florida.
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Old 06-21-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,701 posts, read 8,775,044 times
Reputation: 7314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How do you feel when you encounter an American? With your hands?
I feel tingly all over.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,859 posts, read 3,426,474 times
Reputation: 1801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
In Vancouver I see plates from all over the US. Mainly the western states, but the occasional New Jersey, New York and even Florida.
Some of those cars were probably rental cars. When we visited Vancouver three years ago, we were driving a rental with a California license plate even though we rented it from Portland, Oregon. Two years ago, my coworker had to temporarily rent a car here in Boston and she ended up getting one with an Ontario license plate. I wonder how many people actually mistook her for being a Canadian.
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Old 06-23-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,701 posts, read 8,775,044 times
Reputation: 7314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Some of those cars were probably rental cars. When we visited Vancouver three years ago, we were driving a rental with a California license plate even though we rented it from Portland, Oregon. Two years ago, my coworker had to temporarily rent a car here in Boston and she ended up getting one with an Ontario license plate. I wonder how many people actually mistook her for being a Canadian.
Yes some most definitely are, but a lot of folks from California do drive up, and we down. It's a nice drive, especially along the coast. I've driven to California to visit family and friends many, many times.

There was a thread about driving, and it was stated that people out west in Canada and the US, have different driving habits in regards to distances. No one thinks anything of a 6 hour drive, and doing 3 days of 10 hours is normal for a driving holiday.

We rented a car in Palm Springs and it had Oregon plates, so I know what you mean. People probably assumed we were from Oregon and not BC.

Last edited by Natnasci; 06-23-2019 at 01:22 PM..
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Old 07-11-2019, 02:11 PM
 
193 posts, read 136,336 times
Reputation: 426
I have a generally bad impression of "American" North Americans, although I undeniably am one. So if I'm up in Canada, I'm delighted to talk politics with any of you. Vive la difference!

But since this thread has wandered into the realm of folk linguistics & accents, let me add this. My ears are giving me evidence that undercover Canadians have infiltrated and taken over the US population! Especially in business and media circles, where certain shifts in preposition usage have suddenly come to predominate.

Take the word "around" -- please! Judging by NPR, my main source for serious conversation down here, "around" is hot & trending. They talk "around" the issues of homelessness and the controversies "around" race, and so on. When I was a lad riding a bike, I learned that to go around something was to circle it or avoid it. If I was "talking around" an issue, I was being evasive and not to the point.

Also consider the rampant use of "as to." It's a meaningless pair of words thats sounds pompous and drab out of the mouths of anyone not part of the "Royal We." "Jeeves, would you be so good as to imply as to the health of our distinguished guest?" It's employed to make the loosest, vaguest connection between two independent clauses. Perhaps all those hours of Harry Potter imprinted this worthless Anglicism in Millennial minds, I dunno. But here's what I do know.

One word would fix all this vague verbiage. One strong, robust, definitive preposition that leaves no doubt about its aims and intentions: "About." When we talk about or ask about something, that's it, crisp and direct. But "about" is hardly ever spoken anymore in the US media... and I know why...

Here's the real conspiracy- The US is actually run by undercover Canadians! (Not the best Canadians, obviously, but the one you wouldn't want.) And they won't utter the one word that would blow their covers...

"A-boot."
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Old 07-11-2019, 08:54 PM
 
18,326 posts, read 10,398,747 times
Reputation: 13391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatridger View Post
I have a generally bad impression of "American" North Americans, although I undeniably am one. So if I'm up in Canada, I'm delighted to talk politics with any of you. Vive la difference!

But since this thread has wandered into the realm of folk linguistics & accents, let me add this. My ears are giving me evidence that undercover Canadians have infiltrated and taken over the US population! Especially in business and media circles, where certain shifts in preposition usage have suddenly come to predominate.

Take the word "around" -- please! Judging by NPR, my main source for serious conversation down here, "around" is hot & trending. They talk "around" the issues of homelessness and the controversies "around" race, and so on. When I was a lad riding a bike, I learned that to go around something was to circle it or avoid it. If I was "talking around" an issue, I was being evasive and not to the point.

Also consider the rampant use of "as to." It's a meaningless pair of words thats sounds pompous and drab out of the mouths of anyone not part of the "Royal We." "Jeeves, would you be so good as to imply as to the health of our distinguished guest?" It's employed to make the loosest, vaguest connection between two independent clauses. Perhaps all those hours of Harry Potter imprinted this worthless Anglicism in Millennial minds, I dunno. But here's what I do know.

One word would fix all this vague verbiage. One strong, robust, definitive preposition that leaves no doubt about its aims and intentions: "About." When we talk about or ask about something, that's it, crisp and direct. But "about" is hardly ever spoken anymore in the US media... and I know why...

Here's the real conspiracy- The US is actually run by undercover Canadians! (Not the best Canadians, obviously, but the one you wouldn't want.) And they won't utter the one word that would blow their covers...

"A-boot."
Haaaar! You finally got there, albeit with some real humour and interesting sidebars.

Loved it!
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Old 07-14-2019, 01:44 PM
 
6,402 posts, read 3,502,386 times
Reputation: 5802
There's the old joke about the American lost in Toronto and looking for directions to the nearest ski slope...in June. He's told to go North on Yonge St all the way until the end and turn left.
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Old 07-15-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Ottawa
15 posts, read 3,168 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yes. You also occasionally hear the word "napkin" in French here as well.


"Serviette" has multiple meanings in French: napkin, (bath) towel, briefcase...


Serviette sanitaire = sanitary napkin
From my experience, most people use the word "napkin" in French. Serviette as a briefcase is commonly used in France but I have absolutely never heard it here. Using that word to refer to a briefcase would most likely create confusion.
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