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View Poll Results: How do you feel?
POSITIVE - Thats so fascinating; I wonder what they could be doing here! 10 22.73%
NEUTRAL - Doesn't really think anything of it. 26 59.09%
NEGATIVE - America's govt causes too much problems in the world 8 18.18%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-26-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,164 posts, read 1,748,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
For instance most Canadians wouldn't say " electric bill " but " hydro bill ". However I wouldn't judge someone to be American just based on that.
Not necessarily. When I moved to Alberta (from Ontario), I asked about "the hydro" for my house, and got blank stares. Why? Because you cannot get hydro, or a hydro bill, in a place that has no hydro. We do have electricity in Alberta, of course, but it's not hydroelectric.

"Clique" is interesting. My American ex-wife always pronounced it, "click." I pronounced it "cleek." We each claimed the other was wrong, but as we were years out of high school and our respective cliques, it was something to laugh about.
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Old 05-26-2019, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Not necessarily. When I moved to Alberta (from Ontario), I asked about "the hydro" for my house, and got blank stares. Why? Because you cannot get hydro, or a hydro bill, in a place that has no hydro. We do have electricity in Alberta, of course, but it's not hydroelectric.

"Clique" is interesting. My American ex-wife always pronounced it, "click." I pronounced it "cleek." We each claimed the other was wrong, but as we were years out of high school and our respective cliques, it was something to laugh about.
...and that is why I stated " However I wouldn't judge someone to be American just based on that."

As for Hydro in Alberta..what is this? It might not be the major source, and they may not use the term, but it's there.

https://www.transalta.com/communitie...alberta-hydro/

Clique when pronounced " click " just sounded weird to me.
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Old 05-26-2019, 02:27 PM
 
5,908 posts, read 2,283,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Not as much today.

It's a generational thing, and perhaps even a regional one. I grew up using " serviette " but rarely do now.

Things like " fragile ", " hostile " " niche " , " clique " a lot of the vowel sounds, etc. are better indicators.

For the American accents that are closest to a Canadian one, it's a combination of pronunciation, cadence, and certain terms.

For instance most Canadians wouldn't say " electric bill " but " hydro bill ". However I wouldn't judge someone to be American just based on that.

If someone says " Y'all "....then chances are high they are American.
I don't pay a hydro bill I pay for electricity. In Alberta hydro is an extremely small part of power generation. It did seem strange to say hydro when I lived in BC.

Lever is one word that d9es sound funny when Americans mispronounce it.-as does vehicle.

As even more is the Americans pronounce touque as knitted cap.
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Old 05-26-2019, 04:18 PM
 
6,465 posts, read 4,063,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badlander View Post
Lever is one word that does sound funny when Americans pronounce it.
I fixed it for you.

Maybe this word isn't as common anymore, but I used to think it was very funny that Canadians called a sofa/couch a "chesterfield."
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Old 05-26-2019, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,688 posts, read 6,532,688 times
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"Click" is definitely wrong. It hurts my ears.
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Old 05-26-2019, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badlander View Post
I don't pay a hydro bill I pay for electricity. In Alberta hydro is an extremely small part of power generation. It did seem strange to say hydro when I lived in BC.

Lever is one word that d9es sound funny when Americans mispronounce it.-as does vehicle.

As even more is the Americans pronounce touque as knitted cap.
Isn't that what I posted? Hydro is used by the majority of Canadians though.

Yes lever can be a clue. Vehicle, I do know if someone says VEE HICKLE, they are American...but some do say it pretty close to what we say, with much less emphasis.

As you know there are many, many more indicators that can be a clue to someone being American.
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Old 05-26-2019, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I fixed it for you.

Maybe this word isn't as common anymore, but I used to think it was very funny that Canadians called a sofa/couch a "chesterfield."
Chesterfield, again a generational thing.

"Wherever the British went, they brought along their favourite furniture, including the Chesterfield. Soon, it wasn’t uncommon to see these sofas in locations as widespread as Canada, India, and Australia, where it began to imbed itself as a global style icon. A good example of this is in Canada, where the style was so commonplace that the term ‘Chesterfield’ was used to describe a sofa of any style, even if it was completely different to a true Chesterfield. The word is still used today, though it is expected to eventually be replaced in the lexicon by the more popular American word ‘couch’."

https://www.timelesschesterfields.co...ield-sofa-i152
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Old 05-27-2019, 01:13 PM
 
Location: EPWV
11,032 posts, read 6,194,296 times
Reputation: 12203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
LMAO.

Now when I pronounced "Hawk" as "hawk" instead of "hock" or say "gutter" instead of "eavestrough" and ask for a cup of "cawfee" but look at you funny when you ask if I want "brekkie", you'll know I am from New Jersey.
What if both of those terms “gutter” and “eavestrough” are in your vocabulary and you just use them interchangeably?

Often heard my dad refer to gasoline as petrol. I’ve seen it in the dictionary as a British term. I don’t know the % of Canadians use that word today. I had heard it many years ago when we visited up around the Ontario area but it’s been like eons ago.
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Old 05-27-2019, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Evanston & Lake Forest, Illinois
1,446 posts, read 708,759 times
Reputation: 1803
I've seen BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec license plates in Chicago. I saw U.S. plates in Canada all the time too. What is the big deal?
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Old 05-27-2019, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
9,619 posts, read 6,597,302 times
Reputation: 12037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Where I live I've gone into restaurants after noticing that there is a car with U.S. plates among the vehicles parked outside, only to find that every single person in the place is speaking French and no English is being spoken at all. The vehicles in question usually have Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire or Florida plates.
Pretty much...
I live in Florida, my best friend I grew up with in Canada lives in Maine. We both routinely drive up to Canada to visit relatives.
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