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View Poll Results: How do you feel?
POSITIVE - Thats so fascinating; I wonder what they could be doing here! 13 25.00%
NEUTRAL - Doesn't really think anything of it. 30 57.69%
NEGATIVE - America's govt causes too much problems in the world 9 17.31%
Voters: 52. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-28-2019, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Ottawa
16 posts, read 3,539 times
Reputation: 25

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^ We have Mobil gas stations in Canada too (since last year).

 
Old 05-28-2019, 08:09 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,343 posts, read 6,636,323 times
Reputation: 14425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I wonder if Canadian actors are taught to “Americanize” their vocabulary.
I recall a low-budget made-for-TV “Woman in trouble” flick years ago where a policewoman investigating a newborn’s disappearance asked about the new mother’s “mo-BILE” phone rather than her “MO-bull” phone.

I've read some articles about that and apparently Canadian actors with Canadian dialects and accents who want to work in American films are expected to take additional voice training for actors to "neutralize" their accents so they are able to sound basically like North American west coast to mid west speakers when required.

On some of the British productions I watch, the Brits all say mo-bile (with emphasis on the bile) when mentioning mobile phones, not mo-bill, mo-bull or mo-beel. So I think it must be a common English language "proper" way of pronouncing it. I know when I was going to grade school the British way was how we were taught to pronounce mobile. But mobility is pronounced mo-bill-ity, not mo-bile-ity.


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Old 05-28-2019, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,436 posts, read 54,840,114 times
Reputation: 67001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I agree with that. Gutter is a "dirty" word that I wouldn't want to apply to any part of my home. It brings up medieval images of filthy, sewage filled gutters or polluted ditches at the side of the street, or of undesirable people like street thieves and pick-pockets or street urchins who were referred to as guttersnipes, or of nasty minded people who "have mouths like guttersnipes" (using a lot of really filthy, foul language) and of gutter rats and other vermin or pests.


.
You have a talent for description.

But, we call them gutters. Used to have to get up on the roof with my sister and scoot along the edge, pulling the leaves out of the gutters and throwing them down to the ground to be picked up by our older brother and his wheelbarrow.

I was 59 years old before I heard the word 'eavestrough'.
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:48 AM
 
6,651 posts, read 4,151,403 times
Reputation: 17124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
You have a talent for description.

But, we call them gutters. Used to have to get up on the roof with my sister and scoot along the edge, pulling the leaves out of the gutters and throwing them down to the ground to be picked up by our older brother and his wheelbarrow.

I was 59 years old before I heard the word 'eavestrough'.
I had never heard it until my 50th birthday. Which was the day you mentioned it on this thread.

They're always gutters here. I could have figured out "eavestrough" but it would have taken a double think.
 
Old 05-29-2019, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,576 posts, read 9,459,924 times
Reputation: 6755
Why have folks on this thread developed a gutter mentality?
 
Old 05-29-2019, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,224 posts, read 36,432,107 times
Reputation: 64098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
IMO there is only one way to say "mobile" in English: "mo-BEIL".


"'MO-bull" is one of those gas station chains they have down in the U.S. (Mobil).
I don't recall the last time I heard an American say "mobile" or "mobile phone" for a cell phone. We say cell phone or sometimes just cell.

We do however, have a city called Mobile, Alabama. We pronounce it "MoBEEL."
 
Old 05-29-2019, 08:54 AM
 
6,651 posts, read 4,151,403 times
Reputation: 17124
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I don't recall the last time I heard an American say "mobile" or "mobile phone" for a cell phone. We say cell phone or sometimes just cell.

We do however, have a city called Mobile, Alabama. We pronounce it "MoBEEL."
I do hear "mobile phone" occasionally, but it's always MO-ble. Never mo-beel (although I did know the city was pronounced that way) or mo-byle (which would sound pretentious coming from an American).
 
Old 05-29-2019, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,723 posts, read 8,807,399 times
Reputation: 7343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Why have folks on this thread developed a gutter mentality?



 
Old 05-29-2019, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,979 posts, read 27,449,782 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I don't recall the last time I heard an American say "mobile" or "mobile phone" for a cell phone. We say cell phone or sometimes just cell.

We do however, have a city called Mobile, Alabama. We pronounce it "MoBEEL."
I agree that "mobile phone" is not a common term in the U.S.


But the word "mobile" does have other meanings and uses. And when Americans say it they say "mo-bull". Except in the case of that city you mentioned.
 
Old 05-29-2019, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,707 posts, read 6,559,181 times
Reputation: 8223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I agree that "mobile phone" is not a common term in the U.S.


But the word "mobile" does have other meanings and uses. And when Americans say it they say "mo-bull". Except in the case of that city you mentioned.
Reminds me of a story I read about a Canadian in the south puzzling over the "bob wars." (Barbed wire)
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