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View Poll Results: How do you feel?
POSITIVE - Thats so fascinating; I wonder what they could be doing here! 13 25.00%
NEUTRAL - Doesn't really think anything of it. 30 57.69%
NEGATIVE - America's govt causes too much problems in the world 9 17.31%
Voters: 52. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-29-2019, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,864 posts, read 3,433,921 times
Reputation: 1806

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As an American, I get the feeling each time I visit Canada that Canadians think of us just like any other ordinary one of themselves, nothing more, nothing less. We're nothing special really. You have to go deeper in dialogue to find true differences in values and beliefs and even then there may be similarities.

This is not the same feeling I get when visiting places in the old world where Americans can really stand out.

 
Old 05-29-2019, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,979 posts, read 27,449,782 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Reminds me of a story I read about a Canadian in the south puzzling over the "bob wars." (Barbed wire)
One time I was in Boston with my wife, and I asked a stereotypical (looking) Boston cop for the directions to the nearest subway station.


He said "just go this way and turn onto Dawkman Street".


I said "Do you mean Darkman Street?".


And he looked at me funny and said: "No... Dawkman... D-A-R-T-M-O-U-T-H. Dawkman!"


 
Old 05-29-2019, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,864 posts, read 3,433,921 times
Reputation: 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
One time I was in Boston with my wife, and I asked a stereotypical (looking) Boston cop for the directions to the nearest subway station.


He said "just go this way and turn onto Dawkman Street".


I said "Do you mean Darkman Street?".


And he looked at me funny and said: "No... Dawkman... D-A-R-T-M-O-U-T-H. Dawkman!"


Must have been a transplant from New York or a member of the Boston Brahmin class. I would have thought he would say something like "Dahtmuth" or "Dahtmut"
 
Old 05-30-2019, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,979 posts, read 27,449,782 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Must have been a transplant from New York or a member of the Boston Brahmin class. I would have thought he would say something like "Dahtmuth" or "Dahtmut"
Boston Brahmin is my guess. He sounded a bit like JFK!
 
Old 05-30-2019, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,224 posts, read 36,432,107 times
Reputation: 64098
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I do hear "mobile phone" occasionally, but it's always MO-ble. Never mo-beel (although I did know the city was pronounced that way) or mo-byle (which would sound pretentious coming from an American).
Oh to clarify, I've never heard anyone pronounce "MOBILE" as "mo-BEEL" except when referring to the city of Mobile, Alabama!
 
Old 05-30-2019, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,224 posts, read 36,432,107 times
Reputation: 64098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I agree that "mobile phone" is not a common term in the U.S.


But the word "mobile" does have other meanings and uses. And when Americans say it they say "mo-bull". Except in the case of that city you mentioned.
Right - and in the US, "MO-bull" is a correct pronunciation.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kotgib_jRM

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/...english/mobile

Neither the English or American (or Canadian, which I guess is English) pronunciation is "correct" or "incorrect." They are just different.
 
Old 06-03-2019, 02:28 PM
 
446 posts, read 191,919 times
Reputation: 622
Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
Thank you for saying exactly what I was thinking. I lived in New Jersey in the early 1990s. One of my favorite destinations for week-long trips was to eastern Canada. I got to visit many parts of Ontario, Quebec, NB, NS. Sure, my car had Jersey license plates. When I was walking around town, going to a restaurant or shopping, I did not feel like I was so obviously out of place compared to the local population. Incognito is a good description.

I live most of the year in Tucson. During the winter season, thousands of Canadians (mainly from western provinces) come to southern Arizona to escape the cold. It is such a common thing, that nobody in Tucson gives it a second thought, and many Canadians have told me they feel pretty "incognito" in Tucson as well.
Now I get it why, on "Heartland," they talk about going to Arizona for R&R recovery!
 
Old 06-03-2019, 02:29 PM
 
446 posts, read 191,919 times
Reputation: 622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Must have been a transplant from New York or a member of the Boston Brahmin class. I would have thought he would say something like "Dahtmuth" or "Dahtmut"
Reminds me of the university T-shirt I saw someone wearing years ago -- HAHVAHD.
 
Old 06-03-2019, 05:51 PM
 
2,781 posts, read 1,029,349 times
Reputation: 1778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
As an American, I get the feeling each time I visit Canada that Canadians think of us just like any other ordinary one of themselves, nothing more, nothing less. We're nothing special really. You have to go deeper in dialogue to find true differences in values and beliefs and even then there may be similarities.

This is not the same feeling I get when visiting places in the old world where Americans can really stand out.
Canadians would stick out as well and probably get labelled as Americans. Well, unless they go around carrying a Roots backpack.
 
Old 06-04-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,716 posts, read 26,845,177 times
Reputation: 26725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
Canadians would stick out as well and probably get labelled as Americans. Well, unless they go around carrying a Roots backpack.
Very true. When I travelled through Europe when I was 21 -- many, many, MANY moons ago in 1986 -- we were told (I don't remember by whom) to get patches or stickers of a maple leaf to put on our luggage (and on ourselves) so that people would know that we were Canadian, not American.
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