U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-09-2019, 03:39 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,589 posts, read 10,942,364 times
Reputation: 19234

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Never heard of this and it sounds really odd to me. What does it mean 80 percent pure? In Canada you can not sell maple syrup and label it unless it is 100 percent pure maple syrup.

Do you have some documentation to bolster your claim. Really curious. Also, if it's only 80 percent pure, what is the other 20 percent?

Here are the labelling rules for Canada.

Labelling Requirements for Maple Products - Food - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Maple Syrup

The syrup obtained exclusively by the concentration of maple sap or by the dilution or solution of a maple product in potable water [1, Canadian Standards of Identity, Volume 6 Maple Products]I've tasted Canadian "maple syrup."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-09-2019, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,697 posts, read 8,771,886 times
Reputation: 7314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Maple Syrup

The syrup obtained exclusively by the concentration of maple sap or by the dilution or solution of a maple product in potable water [1, Canadian Standards of Identity, Volume 6 Maple Products]I've tasted Canadian "maple syrup."
I find this interesting, but not being a professional maple sugar maker, I'm having difficulty in believing that Canada would allow watered down maple syrup to be sold. What does happen in the process, is when you are boiling down the syrup, there are different grades of sugar content and natural water content. It doesn't make sense if you are selling the syrup, to spend the time and energy to boil it down to the point where you want to add water...unless you are making a concentrate.

What I think the above regulation is stating is that in Canada maple syrup can be labelled as maple syrup, and concentrated maple syrup can be labelled as maple syrup as well, even though you add water to it.

Although I'm not sure.

I'm hoping someone here will know.

You've tasted Canadian maple syrup. Great...all of them?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2019, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,544,693 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I find this interesting, but not being a professional maple sugar maker, I'm having difficulty in believing that Canada would allow watered down maple syrup to be sold. What does happen in the process, is when you are boiling down the syrup, there are different grades of sugar content and natural water content. It doesn't make sense if you are selling the syrup, to spend the time and energy to boil it down to the point where you want to add water...unless you are making a concentrate.

What I think the above regulation is stating is that in Canada maple syrup can be labelled as maple syrup, and concentrated maple syrup can be labelled as maple syrup as well, even though you add water to it.

Although I'm not sure.

I'm hoping someone here will know.

You've tasted Canadian maple syrup. Great...all of them?
I found it interesting as well so I did some Google research. I think you almost have to be a producer to understand it, but since regulations were standardized between the U.S. and Canada it doesn't seem as though there are many differences. It seems as though the "water" Wyoming refers to is the density of the sap. The higher the sugar content, the denser the syrup. However if it is too dense, it turns into a sugary candy rather than syrup, which it seems is sometimes a difficult exact bar to hit, so in the whole sugaring off process, the density of the syrup is adjusted by adding distilled water. This applies whether in Quebec or Vermont. I think it sounds as though this water is evaporated though, not that the syrup is watered down. It's just about thinning it out while you try to reach the exact 66% density point (or something).

However the Wikipedia article states that Canadian maple syrup must entirely contain maple syrup, while American syrup only has to contain mostly maple syrup. This is different from density though (I think). Vermont has stricter regulations. However, I don't know if the Wikipedia article was updated since the standardization of maple syrup so maybe American maple syrup is 100% maple syrup without other things added all over the place.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maple_syrup

And this is a Vermont maple syrup site which also states that the Brix scale must be in a narrow band of 66% - 68% in order for it to be sold as pure maple syrup, which is the same as Canadian regulations. https://vermontmaple.org/maple-syrup-grades
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....sugar-industry

There don't even seem to be any international disputes about sugar (Brix) levels. The only question that comes up at all is the Wikipedia reference to American states with less stringent regulations than Canada or Vermont calling something pure maple syrup when it has to be contain only mostly pure. I find nothing at all about 80% purity or 90% for that matter.

Last edited by netwit; 06-09-2019 at 11:34 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,179 posts, read 1,756,364 times
Reputation: 2652
Nice post, netwit. I'd rep if I could, but I need to spread it around a little more.

Back when I was in my twenties, I used to volunteer at an Ontario demonstration sugarbush, for the tourists. We produced 100% maple syrup, made by boiling down maple sap; no dilution, no adulteration, and tourists paid full price for such syrup in the gift shop. As for the restaurant, you could have pancakes served with our fresh-daily syrup. We took pride in never serving nor selling anything but 100% Ontario maple syrup, and it was never diluted or adulterated it in any way.

As for me, I was only a volunteer during sugaring season, but I'd always get a five-gallon can of our pure maple syrup as a "thank-you." I'd apportion it out among my fiends and family, but I always kept a portion for myself. When you worked to provide it, it tasted so much better!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,692 posts, read 26,786,951 times
Reputation: 26671
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Nice post, netwit. I'd rep if I could, but I need to spread it around a little more.
I repped her for you. Literally signed "For Chevy"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,544,693 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I repped her for you. Literally signed "For Chevy"
Bahaha!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,697 posts, read 8,771,886 times
Reputation: 7314
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I found it interesting as well so I did some Google research. I think you almost have to be a producer to understand it, but since regulations were standardized between the U.S. and Canada it doesn't seem as though there are many differences. It seems as though the "water" Wyoming refers to is the density of the sap. The higher the sugar content, the denser the syrup. However if it is too dense, it turns into a sugary candy rather than syrup, which it seems is sometimes a difficult exact bar to hit, so in the whole sugaring off process, the density of the syrup is adjusted by adding distilled water. This applies whether in Quebec or Vermont. I think it sounds as though this water is evaporated though, not that the syrup is watered down. It's just about thinning it out while you try to reach the exact 66% density point (or something).

However the Wikipedia article states that Canadian maple syrup must entirely contain maple syrup, while American syrup only has to contain mostly maple syrup. This is different from density though (I think). Vermont has stricter regulations. However, I don't know if the Wikipedia article was updated since the standardization of maple syrup so maybe American maple syrup is 100% maple syrup without other things added all over the place.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maple_syrup

And this is a Vermont maple syrup site which also states that the Brix scale must be in a narrow band of 66% - 68% in order for it to be sold as pure maple syrup, which is the same as Canadian regulations. https://vermontmaple.org/maple-syrup-grades
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia....sugar-industry

There don't even seem to be any international disputes about sugar (Brix) levels. The only question that comes up at all is the Wikipedia reference to American states with less stringent regulations than Canada or Vermont calling something pure maple syrup when it has to be contain only mostly pure. I find nothing at all about 80% purity or 90% for that matter.
This is sort of where I was headed. I can not imagine Canadian Maple syrup to be adulterated and sold as pure. I just don't understand the definition of Maple Syrup in the link, about potable water.

I also could find nothing about 80 percent or 90 percent. I did find that in the US they can add salt to maple syrup and still call it pure.

Perhaps the poster from Wyoming can show us where he got those percentage numbers, because as I said, there would be outrage it it were true, which I suspect they are not.

Thanks everyone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,544,693 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
This is sort of where I was headed. I can not imagine Canadian Maple syrup to be adulterated and sold as pure. I just don't understand the definition of Maple Syrup in the link, about potable water.

I also could find nothing about 80 percent or 90 percent. I did find that in the US they can add salt to maple syrup and still call it pure.

Perhaps the poster from Wyoming can show us where he got those percentage numbers, because as I said, there would be outrage it it were true, which I suspect they are not.

Thanks everyone.
I thought a diner perhaps watered down their maple syrup because of the price and Wyoming thought that was standard Canadian practise but that doesn't really explain where he got his percentages from. I gathered that Camadian maple syrup is regulated federally and the standard is the same everywhere but that this is not true in the US, hence Vermont has higher standards than some other states. From everything I've read Canadian maple syrup always had high standards.

ETA: I came across this UK link in taste testing maple syrups and all but one out of 10 were Canadian. The top five were Canadian and that was followed by one from Vermont. Since I don't care for maple syrup, my taste buds can't be relied on. https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/...0/maple-syrup/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,179 posts, read 1,756,364 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I repped her for you. Literally signed "For Chevy"
Thanks, Dawn! Much appreciated!

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I thought a diner perhaps watered down their maple syrup because of the price....
I think a diner would use the much-less-expensive imitation stuff. Note that I'm thinking of places like Denny's, Golden Griddle, and Smitty's.

The only restaurants I've got pure maple syrup from, have been restaurants in high-end hotels--the Palliser in Calgary, for example; or the Royal York in Toronto. Heck, I still have the (empty) 55 ml bottle of pure maple syrup, from when I got breakfast from room service. I'm sure that the genuine stuff is available elsewhere, but likely not at a diner.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,697 posts, read 8,771,886 times
Reputation: 7314
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Thanks, Dawn! Much appreciated!

I think a diner would use the much-less-expensive imitation stuff. Note that I'm thinking of places like Denny's, Golden Griddle, and Smitty's.

The only restaurants I've got pure maple syrup from, have been restaurants in high-end hotels--the Palliser in Calgary, for example; or the Royal York in Toronto. Heck, I still have the (empty) 55 ml bottle of pure maple syrup, from when I got breakfast from room service. I'm sure that the genuine stuff is available elsewhere, but likely not at a diner.
You can find real maple syrup in some diners, the trendy ones. Most often it's an extra charge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:59 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top