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Old 07-23-2019, 06:08 PM
 
18,358 posts, read 10,426,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Mouldy what do you remember about Eatons or Simpsons or Ogilvies?
Jambo; on my regular business commuter trips to Montreal, I routinely shopped that beautiful Ogilvy's store and would often bring a sweater or piece of jewelry home to surprise my wife. I remember buying an Abercrombie and Fitch Sweatshirt and a monogrammed silver plate pocket flask (still have that) for myself there. They had at one time a counter with Parker Hale hunting rifles on a rack behind it. I'd go there periodically just to lust over those beautifully checkered rifles.

That was a great store. Hope it still flourishes as it did.
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Old 07-23-2019, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,706 posts, read 6,555,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
I am old enough to remember having used portions of both the Eatons and Simpsons Sears catalogues in the privy out back of our farmhouse on old highway 48 in (404) Vandorf.
I am old enough to remember that too!

My grandmother was very fond of Eaton's. We always made a trip to the basement where all the immigrants went. They had tables full of shoes that were a year or two out of style along with other cheap items.

I also experienced the horror of grabbing a strange lady's skirt in Eaton's upon which I realised I'd lost my mother somewhere in the racks of clothes.

We also went upstairs to some place where I was introduced to French fries with gravy. However our trip to the city invariably took us past a meat processing plant - I think it was called Dominion Meat Processing - and its resultant fumes. Something about fries with gravy and the remnants of that smell in my nostrils did not agree with me.
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Old 07-23-2019, 06:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I am old enough to remember that too!

My grandmother was very fond of Eaton's. We always made a trip to the basement where all the immigrants went. They had tables full of shoes that were a year or two out of style along with other cheap items.

I also experienced the horror of grabbing a strange lady's skirt in Eaton's upon which I realised I'd lost my mother somewhere in the racks of clothes.

We also went upstairs to some place where I was introduced to French fries with gravy. However our trip to the city invariably took us past a meat processing plant - I think it was called Dominion Meat Processing - and its resultant fumes. Something about fries with gravy and the remnants of that smell in my nostrils did not agree with me.
You got the Eaton's basement thing described to a "tee". Those tables seemed huge when I was a tad and you'd see the ladies pawing through the shoes to find a pair of matching sizes. Gloves and mittens were similarly displayed on those tables.

I remember that our visits to the "big smoke" for shopping purposes would also include a visit to FW Woolworth's on Queen St. and it was always there that we would eat in their huge cafeteria. I was reminded of that a week or so ago when the old menu was sent around by bulk e-mail.
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Old 07-23-2019, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,190 posts, read 1,762,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
My first .22 rifle, an Etonia made for Eaton's by Cooey, was bought from their catalogue to handle rats on the farm and later given to me as a Christmas present on my twelfth b'day.
I think I know exactly the rifle you are talking about--a break-action, single shot rifle, that was maybe two-and-a-half feet long. Post and notch sights. I got to try one maybe twenty years ago--a farmer friend had one, and we took it out to the back-forty one day. It was definitely child-sized; perfect for a 12-year-old. Lucky you, Bru!

Cooey made some awesome rifles, and I'm always surprised that they are rarely mentioned when a discussion of rifles comes up. They performed well, and with regular maintenance, did what they were designed to do for years and years and years. No wonder that Eaton's chose Cooey to manufacture its house brand of rifles.
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Old 07-24-2019, 04:08 AM
 
34,487 posts, read 41,610,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Jambo; on my regular business commuter trips to Montreal, I routinely shopped that beautiful Ogilvy's store and would often bring a sweater or piece of jewelry home to surprise my wife. I remember buying an Abercrombie and Fitch Sweatshirt and a monogrammed silver plate pocket flask (still have that) for myself there. They had at one time a counter with Parker Hale hunting rifles on a rack behind it. I'd go there periodically just to lust over those beautifully checkered rifles.

That was a great store. Hope it still flourishes as it did.
I thought it had closed but i was wrong seems to be still there just under a bit of a name change its now called Holt Renfrew Ogilvy.
https://www.holtrenfrew.com/en/store...renfrew-ogilvy
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Old 07-24-2019, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,190 posts, read 1,762,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I think I know exactly the rifle you are talking about....
Bru, as long as we're talking guns, and you seem to know about firearms that were easily available in Ontario back in the day, what do you know about Tobin Arms? Especially as to shotguns.
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:15 AM
 
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Chevy; My little Eatonia was your most basic of bolt action single shots with it capable of either shorts or LR's and it got bent around a tree in the yard when the ramp-over for bolt locking had gotten rounded off enough that when I didn't get the bolt handle all the way seated, upon firing, the bolt ejected backward and clipped me on the temple putting a gouge there that caused my mom to scream when she saw me walking up the driveway covered in blood. To remove the bolt on those little guys was as simple as just holding the trigger and pulling back on the cocking knob so once I'd pulled that trigger, it was all she wrote but for the fat lady I heard singing while I came back to full consciousness. Dad took that little gun and wrapped it around the old maple tree in the back yard. It could have been easily fixed but he had to have his moment of relief and anger release at me not losing an eye or something far more serious. I moved on to a later Marlin semi-auto with a scope.


I have to admit to not having any knowledge whatsoever about them, other than when once duck hunting in the Luther marsh area, probably in the early 70's, an older fellow invited along had an old Tobin open hammerd side-by-side that NONE of us had ever heard of before. The oddity of duck hunting with anything other than a pump or semi-auto gun was enough to garner some teasing on our part so not much else was learned other than him stating his father had bought it because it was made in Woodstock, Ontario.

That's it.

Then I did a google and found this: "Frank M. Tobin was a Canadian born in Halifax in 1862. As a young man he moved to the U.S. and worked as an agent for various sporting goods dealers and firearm manufacturers. By 1903, he had had enough of the salesman's life and, with a group of local businessmen, formed the Tobin Arms Company of Norwich, Connecticut. His aim was to build a quality side by side shotgun to compete with the established makers. Tobin purchased a patented design from a Californian named Clarence M. Wollam, called it the Simplex action, and set about building shotguns. After six years of production, Tobin decided to return to Canada and relocated his factory to Woodstock, Ontario. The Tobin Arms Manufacturing Company Ltd. was incorporated on August 9, 1909. Unfortunately, repeating shotguns such as the Winchester models 1897 and 1912, and John Browning's Auto 5 were becoming popular and, by 1916, Frank Tobin's dream was ending. The Arnold Thompson Tool Company took over part of the factory. Tobin Arms surrendered its charter on December 19, 1921 although G. B. Crandall took up the manufacture of Tobin guns and produced them until at least 1930. Frank Tobin passed away on October 10, 1939 but is still remembered as the man who built Canada's first shotgun factory."

And this: $7500 worth of TOBIN!!! - The DoubleGun BBS @ doublegunshop.com

And another: https://www.thefirearmsforum.com/thr...shotgun.51287/
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Old 07-24-2019, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Kanada 🍁
120,102 posts, read 14,329,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I do! It was the anchor store of many malls. I miss it; I liked that it was a "general purpose" store. Nowadays, Costco is the only real "general purpose" store.

When my family arrived in Vancouver/Canada it was the first store we visited. We returned many times to the store until they closed down.
miss it as well Dawn.
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Old 07-24-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,720 posts, read 8,800,036 times
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Every single Canadian of a certain age remembers Eaton's. I remember when they moved from West Hastings Street to their new home across from The Hudson's Bay at Georgia and Granville. Spanking new premises and seemed fancy at the time. The building they occupied before was a department store called Spencer's. Then Sears took over after they left. Now gone, but the rotating observation deck they added in the 1970's is still called Sear's Tower, by us who just can't change

Then they got bought by Sears Canada. They kept the Eaton's name, and tried really hard to be an upscale store. Aubergine was the colour of the branding. Didn't last. It's now a Nordstrom's. MEH.

However if you ask most Vancouverites, which department store they miss most of all, it has to be Woodward's. A classic department store that started here in 1892.
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Old 07-24-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,720 posts, read 8,800,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I am old enough to remember that too!

My grandmother was very fond of Eaton's. We always made a trip to the basement where all the immigrants went. They had tables full of shoes that were a year or two out of style along with other cheap items.

I also experienced the horror of grabbing a strange lady's skirt in Eaton's upon which I realised I'd lost my mother somewhere in the racks of clothes.

We also went upstairs to some place where I was introduced to French fries with gravy. However our trip to the city invariably took us past a meat processing plant - I think it was called Dominion Meat Processing - and its resultant fumes. Something about fries with gravy and the remnants of that smell in my nostrils did not agree with me.
My grandmother ( born 1910 ) always called department stores by the owner. It was Mr. Eaton's, for example.
" I bought this at Mr. Eaton's store ".

Of course The Hudson's Bay, was just The Bay.

I loved the food you could get in department stores as a kid. Woodward's had a ground floor restaurant with both table and counter service. A snack bar and a mezzanine cafe.

When we were teenagers and old enough to venture out, a couple of friends and I went to Woodward's restaurant and sat in the " dining room ". LOL. One of my friends didn't finish his vegetables, and the waitress, told him, he can't order desert unless he ate them. Ha, ha.

Today there would probably be a lawsuit !
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