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Old 08-12-2019, 04:10 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
On this one I beg to differ. French Canadian cuisine most definitely exists and it is not just a copy of what was imported from France. It is unique, original and native to this country.


Ah! Poutine!
.
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Old 08-12-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,152 posts, read 27,595,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Ah! Poutine!
.
Poutine is just the tip of the iceberg, and not really the best example.
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Old 08-12-2019, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Manners View Post
But there is no English Canadian cuisine. You guys just make mediocre American food.

Like perogies.
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Like perogies.
Has the pierogy in Canada evolved into something very different and distant from its Ukrainian roots?
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,725 posts, read 6,588,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Has the pierogy in Canada evolved into something very different and distant from its Ukrainian roots?
That's not even the point. It seems to me as if every ethnicity is automatically lumped in with English Canada. Not a whole lot of "English" Canada is English. So what's American about perogies which are very popular in parts of the country? Or lasagna?

(But the perogy has changed. The Mennonite perogy is different from the Ukrainian perogy although it became a uniquely Mennonite perogy when Dutch Mennonites came into contact with it in Ukraine. )
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Montreal
420 posts, read 280,066 times
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It's hard to talk about genuinely Canadian food without bringing up Quebec, like poutine (as mentioned) but also chomeur pudding and tourtieres. (To start a list). These are all unique to Canada but a large percentage of the people making them see themselves as something different from the ROC.

In the U.S. there is Soul food, Cajun food, stuff like scrapple, grits, and old bay crab cakes. They are all quite unique to the U.S and American culture. That is also if we leave out other stuff like Hawaiian food and Tex-Mex.

There is a big difference between something like perogies, or hamburgers, or spaghetti, which are essentially a slightly different version of another culture's cuisine, and actually taking a variety of ingredients and elements, and combining to create a new kind of cuisine.

Now I'm getting hungry. I really like Cajun food, maybe it is due to my roots, but I wish you could find outside of the U.S. in any capacity. It takes time to cook and there really isn't anything else like it. I think I might have to take another trip down south soon.
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,152 posts, read 27,595,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
That's not even the point. It seems to me as if every ethnicity is automatically lumped in with English Canada. Not a whole lot of "English" Canada is English. So what's American about perogies which are very popular in parts of the country? Or lasagna?

(But the perogy has changed. The Mennonite perogy is different from the Ukrainian perogy although it became a uniquely Mennonite perogy when Dutch Mennonites came into contact with it in Ukraine. )
But what is "Canadian" about all of this? The Nowhere Else But Here Test ? Because in a globalized world, any food can be ppular anywhere. That does not make it "of" a certain place.
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,152 posts, read 27,595,015 times
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Uniquely Canadian cuisine not from Quebec...

Many are from Newfoundland like seal flipper pie and jiggs dinner.

Also

Butter tarts

Nanaimo bars

Saskatoon berries

Bloody caesars too if you count that as food.
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,152 posts, read 27,595,015 times
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Pad Thaï is not a Trois-Rivières specialty that defines the culinary culture of the city, even if it is very popular there...
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,725 posts, read 6,588,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
But what is "Canadian" about all of this? The Nowhere Else But Here Test ? Because in a globalized world, any food can be ppular anywhere. That does not make it "of" a certain place.
It's eaten by multicultural Canadians. When you have immigrants from many different countries making a new country, why, if they are many cultures would you expect them to forgo the foods they bought with them or expect a singularly "English " food to develop? Instead they adapted their food to local concerns and regional fusion foods developed, as with the ubiquitous Chinese restaurants in the prairies, which offer food no Chinese would recognize but is adapted to western tastes. The Brits did the same with curry. How can you argue that a multicultural part of the country wouldn't retain their foods and therefore those foods, by definition, become Canadian. It's not one ethnicity here to which immigrants have to adapt.
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