U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-12-2019, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,180 posts, read 27,610,748 times
Reputation: 8690

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
It's eaten by multicultural Canadians. When you have immigrants from many different countries making a new country, why, if they are many cultures would you expect them to forgo the foods they bought with them or expect a singularly "English " food to develop?.
We're not talking about singularly "English" foods, we're talking about singular foods that have emerged from the part of the country that uses English to file its tax returns and where the receipt printed out at Canadian Tire is in that language.

There doesn't have to be anything English about the food, it just has to be unique to that specific part of the country, originated there and not simply a copy something that originated somewhere else.

Though sometimes things can originate elsewhere but be transformed into something that is "of" another place.

For example donairs in Atlantic Canada have their origins in doner-kebabs in the Middle East. But over time they've morphed into something completely different. Largely unrecognizable when compared to the original.

Similar to American-Canadian Chinese food that you've already referenced.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-12-2019, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,725 posts, read 11,260,657 times
Reputation: 3830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
??? It's the middle of summer and people are bored so everyone decided it was time for a big family reunion in the Canada forum ???

I have a great idea. Lets all crack out the BBQ's and beer and celebrate our blessings, similarities and good fortunes to be here together instead of bringing up grievances and making a big deal about our differences.


.
Fantastic

I can't rep you again yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2019, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,725 posts, read 11,260,657 times
Reputation: 3830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I do think all three of us are pretty much on the same page.


But some people (on both sides of the issue I'd say) do get touchy when it comes to the conversation about "immigrants" integrating.


Only very small fringes at both extremes actually think people should set up enclaves and live exactly like in the old country, or on the other side be force-fed poutine and hockey and have everything from their country of origin erased from memory.
I think there is only so much to be said back and forth in the forum. We'll talk more about this at Z's BBQ

If we can't come to a definitive win - it'll be me and UL - in the Octagon to settle the score once and for all lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2019, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,180 posts, read 27,610,748 times
Reputation: 8690
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
I think there is only so much to be said back and forth in the forum. We'll talk more about this at Z's BBQ

If we can't come to a definitive win - it'll be me and UL - in the Octagon to settle the score once and for all lol.
I think I can't thank you enough for keeping me out of the Octogon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2019, 08:28 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,941 posts, read 4,512,387 times
Reputation: 3325
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
It's eaten by multicultural Canadians. When you have immigrants from many different countries making a new country, why, if they are many cultures would you expect them to forgo the foods they bought with them or expect a singularly "English " food to develop? Instead they adapted their food to local concerns and regional fusion foods developed, as with the ubiquitous Chinese restaurants in the prairies, which offer food no Chinese would recognize but is adapted to western tastes. The Brits did the same with curry. How can you argue that a multicultural part of the country wouldn't retain their foods and therefore those foods, by definition, become Canadian. It's not one ethnicity here to which immigrants have to adapt.
Basically what you are saying is anything goes. There is no food to identify local culture, it is just what ever anyone wants to call Canadian. From now on I will call sushi Manitoban cuisine and Chinese buffets, Manitoban buffets.


Pretty much every country in the americas has developed it's own regional cuisine, That is unique and different from anywhere else. If Quebecois cuisine is the most unique and representative of this land then I will roll with that. I would say Maritimes does pretty well with its own cuisine too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2019, 08:30 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,941 posts, read 4,512,387 times
Reputation: 3325
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
I think there is only so much to be said back and forth in the forum. We'll talk more about this at Z's BBQ

If we can't come to a definitive win - it'll be me and UL - in the Octagon to settle the score once and for all lol.
The Canadian forum is now known as the octagon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2019, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,180 posts, read 27,610,748 times
Reputation: 8690
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Basically what you are saying is anything goes. There is no food to identify local culture, it is just what ever anyone wants to call Canadian. From now on I will call sushi Manitoban cuisine and Chinese buffets, Manitoban buffets.

.

And in spite of my posts, I actually think it's perfectly fine if (Anglo-)Canada wants to be that way. I mean, based on online posters and most people out there in the world, they're perfectly fine and happy with this approach.

It's only problematic when people start saying that they're, umm, a fish, when in actual fact they're a groundhog. (Please do not read anything into the choice of animals.)


And then they take it further - in a defensive measure - they say "Well, everyone in Canada is a groundhog anyway. Including Quebec! And in fact, everyone around the world is a groundhog too, just like Anglo-Canada!"


When the truth is that Anglo-Canada while fully within its prerogatives to be this way, is fairly atypical. The world is primarily composed of "fish" societies.


And certainly, in the Canadian context, Quebec should not be lumped into the vision of things that Anglo-Canada has fashioned for itself. My sense is that Newfoundland is probably an outlier as well to some degree.


It was said on here recently that Anglo-Canada's culture was Americanized to the tune of 65%, whereas Quebec is 60% Americans, topped off with a "so what?". As someone who has lived half his life in either place, I would strongly disagree. Quebec is very Americanized it is true, but if we're making comparisons, the percentages are probably more like 50-60% in Quebec (still very high) versus 90-95% in Anglo-Canada (near-total domination).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2019, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,665 posts, read 11,178,101 times
Reputation: 10391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

It was said on here recently that Anglo-Canada's culture was Americanized to the tune of 65%, whereas Quebec is 60% Americans, topped off with a "so what?". As someone who has lived half his life in either place, I would strongly disagree. Quebec is very Americanized it is true, but if we're making comparisons, the percentages are probably more like 50-60% in Quebec (still very high) versus 90-95% in Anglo-Canada (near-total domination).
I don't question your insights on Quebec, but I really think you're missing the mark on Anglo Canada. As someone who's lived both in the US and the West, Canadians cultural intake is high, but Canada is still a very, very different place than the US. Especially as you move away from the border.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2019, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,180 posts, read 27,610,748 times
Reputation: 8690
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
I don't question your insights on Quebec, but I really think you're missing the mark on Anglo Canada. As someone who's lived both in the US and the West, Canadians cultural intake is high, but Canada is still a very, very different place than the US. Especially as you move away from the border.
I had thought about qualifying my post with something like "apparent" or "visible" culture, but not sure if these are the right terms. Had I found the right way of saying it, it may have made my comments more palatable.


I don't really disagree that (Anglo-)Canada is quite different from the U.S. in terms of mindset. All of which is actually a small miracle given the amount of intake and the ensuing acculturation.


Been paying attention to this since the 1980s and have to admit to thinking at times that eventually a tipping point will be reached and values and mindset will become more harmonized - but it seemingly never does.


Though perhaps it's just the case of the proverbial frog in boiling water - it's happening subtly and slowly and we just don't notice.


Of course, that probably doesn't work either as U.S. society definitely isn't static. So in many cases, as soon as Canada can be said to have moved to something that's more like the way the U.S. is, Americans may already have moved on to something else. (Not to say that Canadians are always one step behind. There are many areas where they are arguably ahead.)


Anyway...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2019, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,665 posts, read 11,178,101 times
Reputation: 10391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I had thought about qualifying my post with something like "apparent" or "visible" culture, but not sure if these are the right terms. Had I found the right way of saying it, it may have made my comments more palatable.


I don't really disagree that (Anglo-)Canada is quite different from the U.S. in terms of mindset. All of which is actually a small miracle given the amount of intake and the ensuing acculturation.


Been paying attention to this since the 1980s and have to admit to thinking at times that eventually a tipping point will be reached and values and mindset will become more harmonized - but it seemingly never does.


Though perhaps it's just the case of the proverbial frog in boiling water - it's happening subtly and slowly and we just don't notice.


Of course, that probably doesn't work either as U.S. society definitely isn't static. So in many cases, as soon as Canada can be said to have moved to something that's more like the way the U.S. is, Americans may already have moved on to something else. (Not to say that Canadians are always one step behind. There are many areas where they are arguably ahead.)


Anyway...
I agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top