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Old Today, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,787 posts, read 8,856,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I'm in southern Alberta. I've been down to Montana a few times.

Really, it's not much different at first glance. Montana has prairies, like Alberta, and mountains in the west; and there are small towns scattered about, most of them off the Interstate, just as they are here, off the major highways. The Interstate shield is familiar, as it is on our road signs up here ("Alberta 4 to Interstate 15"), using Alberta's normal route marker and the familiar red-white-and-blue Interstate shield. Great Falls, Montana, is on Alberta Highway 4's distance signs, though the distance is marked in kilometers. On the other hand, once you leave Shelby MT on I-15 north, the signs indicate that the next city is Lethbridge, AB, and the distance is marked in miles. The way the road signs treat them, Great Falls and Lethbridge might as well be two cities in the same country, especially since the only thing that separates Canada and the USA hereabouts is a pagewire fence. There is a major customs post at Coutts AB and Sweetgrass MT, of course (connecting Alberta 4 and I-15), but either side of that is a simple fence.

The differences manifest themselves more subtly. It's not just buying gas in gallons, but it's the inability to pay at the pump using my credit card, because Canadian credit cards don't work at US pumps. So I always have to go into the station to prepay. And all those cigarettes on display behind the gas station clerk--in Alberta, they must be hidden behind a curtain or silmilar. At a time when Canadian sports bars at home are showing hockey, news about hockey, and anything else related to hockey (to the exclusion of other sports); it's nice to stop into an American sports bar where football (pro and college), baseball, and basketball get equal time with hockey--if hockey is shown at all. For that matter, the sports section of an American newspaper does not devote the first five to ten pages to hockey, the way newspapers do here.

Like I said, the differences here in the North American west are subtle. Anybody not from the US or Canada might not notice them, but to us Americans and Canadians, they are apparent.
There is a trick that usually works. Use the numbers from your postal code and add two zero's.

Another one that worked years ago for me was replacing the alpha characters in my postal code with 5's.

I'll be doing a road trip to the US soon, so I'll let you know which one works. You can also contact your credit card company as they may know as well.
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Old Today, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Crossing into Washington State near Vancouver, the difference used to be that on the Washington side the highway was paved in cement sections. So your car tires would make a little noise from the crease between the sections, compared to the smooth asphalt on the Canadians side.

Now they have done away with that, and the road is much the same.

Of course road signs, miles instead of K's, more police presence on the highways, and different stores and restaurants.
You notice an accent change as well, that and the money are usually the first ones to let you know you're not in Canada.

On the eastern side of the province and state, where I cross, the difference is less perceptible until you actually get to a town.
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Old Today, 01:05 PM
 
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I'm bemused, because two Canadians in this thread have mentioned hearing a "different accent" upon crossing the border. In my experience, Canadians almost always indignantly deny that they have a different accent from Americans. (They do have a slightly different accent, but I think this is the first time I've heard anyone admit it.)
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Old Today, 01:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm bemused, because two Canadians in this thread have mentioned hearing a "different accent" upon crossing the border.
Three, if you count me. :P (Upon crossing the border, the people on the other side either have a marked Anglo accent or else don't speak the language, the latter being more frequent as distance to the border increases, reaching ~100% pretty soon as you venture further south.)
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Old Today, 01:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Three, if you count me. :P (Upon crossing the border, the people on the other side either have a marked Anglo accent or else don't speak the language, the latter being more frequent as distance to the border increases, reaching ~100% pretty soon as you venture further south.)
Ah, you must be a French-speaker.
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Old Today, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,724 posts, read 6,580,043 times
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[QUOTE=saibot;55917123]I'm bemused, because two Canadians in this thread have mentioned hearing a "different accent" upon crossing the border. In my experience, Canadians almost always indignantly deny that they have a different accent from Americans. (They do have a slightly different accent, but I think this is the first time I've heard anyone admit it.)[/quote]

I've never heard a Canadian say they speak the same as Americans. I'd be interested in seeing a post or two where anyone has said that. What has been brought up repeatedly on this forum is Canadians denying they say "aboot" and pointing out American newscasters who have adopted a Canadian accent as neutral. So I'm a little confused here over how you got that idea from this forum.
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Old Today, 03:10 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,908 posts, read 4,494,161 times
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The Major difference I see are the demogrpahics. You don't see many Hispanics here in Canada and there are no African Americans. The few blacks we have here are mostly recent immgrants from Africa. When I am in the USA I don't see many people from India. South Asians along with other Asians are the biggest visible minorities here. Even here on the prairies this is how it is.

And yes the accent is different, but aside from that Anglo Canadians have adopted many American cultural traits.
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Old Today, 03:14 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,453 posts, read 6,690,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I'm bemused, because two Canadians in this thread have mentioned hearing a "different accent" upon crossing the border. In my experience, Canadians almost always indignantly deny that they have a different accent from Americans. (They do have a slightly different accent, but I think this is the first time I've heard anyone admit it.)
That's par for the course. There's definitely differences in accents even if they're very slight, but not all of them are slight. Pronunciation of words is sometimes different too. Here in west coast Canada it's not very often that you'll hear somebody speaking with an accent that identifies them as having grown up in the parts of the states where people have strong cultural accents typical of those states. Like Texas for example, or the Appalachians, or the Carolinas or Alabama (especially Alabama!!!). Because people from those places don't generally want to move to Canada and it's rare for them to do so, but they DO move to places like California, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Montana, etc. So when you drive across the border here into Washington or Idaho and are expecting to mainly hear the typical west coast accent that is shared by both Canadians and Americans and you hear those accents mixed in with the west coast accent you KNOW you're no longer in Canada (aside from all the other obvious differences that were mentioned like road signs and stuff).
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Old Today, 03:49 PM
 
467 posts, read 174,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Here in west coast Canada it's not very often that you'll hear somebody speaking with an accent that identifies them as having grown up in the parts of the states where people have strong cultural accents typical of those states. Like Texas for example, or the Appalachians, or the Carolinas or Alabama (especially Alabama!!!). Because people from those places don't generally want to move to Canada and it's rare for them to do so, but they DO move to places like California, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Montana, etc. So when you drive across the border here into Washington or Idaho and are expecting to mainly hear the typical west coast accent that is shared by both Canadians and Americans and you hear those accents mixed in with the west coast accent you KNOW you're no longer in Canada (aside from all the other obvious differences that were mentioned like road signs and stuff).
.
Good point! You DO hear Southern accents in the US west coast and as mentioned they are Southern transplants. Yes and that is a clear indicator one is not in Canada anymore.
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Old Today, 04:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I've never heard a Canadian say they speak the same as Americans. I'd be interested in seeing a post or two where anyone has said that. What has been brought up repeatedly on this forum is Canadians denying they say "aboot" and pointing out American newscasters who have adopted a Canadian accent as neutral. So I'm a little confused here over how you got that idea from this forum.
I didn't get the idea from this forum. I have read it repeatedly on other forums (which I am not allowed to link to here), and also in real life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post
Good point! You DO hear Southern accents in the US west coast and as mentioned they are Southern transplants. Yes and that is a clear indicator one is not in Canada anymore.
I live in California and have a lot of family in Washington, and I rarely...rarely....hear Southern US accents in either place. It is actually not that common any more for Southerners/Texans etc. to move to the West Coast; rather the reverse. If I heard a Southern accent in my town I would assume the speaker was a tourist, just as I would assume you might hear a tourist with a Southern accent visiting Canada.
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