U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-03-2022, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Canada
6,600 posts, read 4,402,749 times
Reputation: 7900

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I thought squirrels were brown or red.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_squirrel
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-03-2022, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
17,522 posts, read 13,261,072 times
Reputation: 10960
Poutine, Tim Horton's and hockey.

Stereotypes of course, some manufactured, like Tim Horton's. The power of advertising. I've mentioned this before, but for people of a certain generation, out here in BC, and probably other places outside of Ontario, it didn't exist. By the time they arrived here and started this Canada equals Tim Horton's type of advertising, it fell flat here, at least to me. We did not grow up with it, so even to this day, Tim Horton's means nothing to me. Don't like their doughnuts, or the food. Regardless, it always felt like manipulation when a large corporation is obviously trying to get profits from peoples love of their country.

Poutine. Again, something that somehow has taken on to mean Canadian cuisine. It's embarrassing. It's junk food, only became widely known outside of Quebec in the last 20 or so years??? It has become beyond silly with new creations just being different foods thrown onto a pile of chips and gravy. I'm sure many in Quebec also cringe at this being known as the most widely known Quebecois cuisine, when other Quebecois cuisine has more to offer.

Now hockey. I'm not a hockey fan in the sense of following the NHL, although going to a game can be fun just for the spectacle of it all. However I can't deny that hockey is ingrained in Canadian culture. Has it changed into a game of corporate greed, like all other big money making sports? Yes, at a certain level, but there are still leagues and kids who love the game and play it. Plus amateur adult teams of men and women. I don't think they play because a corporation is getting into their brains. They probably started out like millions of other Canadians playing street hockey. Something you still see a lot of today.

The OP posted what they love about Canada, and we can't argue with their perceptions, buy perhaps make them understand that what they think isn't necessarily what Canadians love as well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2022, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,918 posts, read 34,642,873 times
Reputation: 10972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Poutine, Tim Horton's and hockey.

Stereotypes of course, some manufactured, like Tim Horton's. The power of advertising. I've mentioned this before, but for people of a certain generation, out here in BC, and probably other places outside of Ontario, it didn't exist. By the time they arrived here and started this Canada equals Tim Horton's type of advertising, it fell flat here, at least to me. We did not grow up with it, so even to this day, Tim Horton's means nothing to me. Don't like their doughnuts, or the food. Regardless, it always felt like manipulation when a large corporation is obviously trying to get profits from peoples love of their country.
.
I recall maybe 20-25 years ago people in Quebec used to refer to Anglo-Canadians (which conflates with Ontarians for most here) as "Tim Hortons people" in a mocking way.

That was before Tim Hortons embarked on a huge marketing and expansion push in Quebec.

Today though, Québécois are much the same as other Canadians - at least when it comes to Tim Hortons.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2022, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,918 posts, read 34,642,873 times
Reputation: 10972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post

Poutine. Again, something that somehow has taken on to mean Canadian cuisine. It's embarrassing. It's junk food, only became widely known outside of Quebec in the last 20 or so years??? It has become beyond silly with new creations just being different foods thrown onto a pile of chips and gravy. I'm sure many in Quebec also cringe at this being known as the most widely known Quebecois cuisine, when other Quebecois cuisine has more to offer.

.
Quebecers don't mind that so much, but aren't too keen to have it usurped as a "local delicacy" by other parts of Canada.

Like when poutine appears as a "Toronto signature dish" in marketing for the Toronto Raptors or Toronto Blue Jays!

In terms of the different kinds of poutine (Italian, Mexican, or even posher ones with filet mignon and brie), Quebec is actually at the forefront of that trend. We love that stuff.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2022, 03:29 PM
 
2,390 posts, read 1,009,079 times
Reputation: 5860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
A dyed in the wool tea-granny here.

I don't really think it matters much what the brands are as much as it matters what countries and types of soils and climates the teas are grown in and how they are 'cured' after harvest and before export. For example during curing some teas are fermented, some are dry smoked laid out on racks over various types of smouldering aromatic woods inside smoke-houses or in caves possessing a specific humidity, some are sun cured, etc., etc. And then, it's very important how the teas are prepared just prior to consumption. They are all grown and processed differently and they all taste different.

I grow a variety of my own teas but I don't grow camellias sinensis or assamica where I live right now (but they are on my to-do list of plants to grow) which are what most commonly known and purchased teas are produced from. See some information here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camellia_sinensis

"White tea, yellow tea, green tea, oolong, dark tea (which includes pu-erh tea) and black tea are all harvested from one of two major varieties grown today, C. sinensis var. sinensis and C. s. var. assamica, but are processed differently to attain varying levels of oxidation with black tea being the most oxidized and green being the least. Kukicha (twig tea) is also harvested from C. sinensis, but uses twigs and stems rather than leaves."

I can buy all manner and species of teas from around the world in local grocery stores and tea shops here in Canada. Some are imported from other countries, some are grown in Canada. I can and do create my own c. sinensis blends and often will include several other types of plant leaves and flowers to impart different flavours, aromas and medicinal properties to the teas.

Your US brand that does the double bergamot Earl Grey may get it's more robust 'double' flavour and aroma from the addition of the American indigenous pink flowering herb Monarda didyma which is a member of the mint family. It's known by a number of different common names including bee balm, Oswego tea and bergamot, that American species is native to eastern American states, and it has the really strong flavour and aroma that is imparted to very robust Earl Grey teas. All Earl Greys have one species or another or even a blend of different Monardas in them. If you particularly like an Earl Grey style of teas you can grow your own different varieties of Monarda plants in your garden to add to your regular C. sinensis tea. Or you can make a tea of it just by itself. There are several types and colours of Monarda which grow around the world and each type and colour has a distinctive 'bergamot' flavour of its own. It's a medicinal herb and both the leaves and flowers are used.

Ruth, how do you prepare your tea? By English and most Asian countries' standards to put a tea bag into a cup of boiled water to steep, as many Americans are known to do, is considered sacrilege and blasphemy to all the tea gods. LOL. Likewise with sun tea that is done in cold water in a clear glass jug and set out in the sun to steep under the sun. Oh, the horror!

Tea must be prepared in a pre-heated tea pot by putting dry measured tea leaves (or tea ball or tea bag) into the hot, empty tea pot and then pour still bubbling and roiling boiling water over the leaves to scald the leaves. Then the pot of tea must be allowed to steep for a specific period of time to achieve exactly the desired flavour, colour, aroma and release of essential oils and medicinal properties out of the scalded leaves into the boiled water. Then the tea must be drunk immediately when it's still quite hot, just cooled enough to not scald the mouth, throat and stomach.

.
Earl Gray teas flavor comes from Citrus Bergamia.

The monarda didyma or monarda fistulosa, etc - is NEVER used to make an Earl Grey tea.

You could try it - it is non-drinkable.

Canada has great farmers’ s markets: personally partial to the ones in Quebec Province; their grocery stores have some unique items too
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2022, 03:35 PM
 
5,274 posts, read 2,709,647 times
Reputation: 11462
What stands out for me and not necessarily in any order :

Water
Peacekeeper and Ally
Diverse race and gender inclusion in leadership roles
First Nations influence and reconciliation
Hate speech unconstitutional
Value immigrants
Gun laws
Constitutional monarchy
Commonwealth country
Women's rights
Government supports in health and wellness
Plentiful energy resources
Lakes and rivers abundant
Unspoiled wilderness and wildlife
World class archaeology
Clean of litter
Maintained infrastructure
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2022, 01:18 AM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,517 posts, read 12,301,938 times
Reputation: 31205
Quote:
Originally Posted by L00k4ward View Post
Earl Gray teas flavor comes from Citrus Bergamia.
In Europe. And it's strictly regulated.

Citrus Bergamia is only allowed to grow in Italy and commercial production of the plant is restricted to Italy. The government there has extremely tight controls on the bergamot citrus plants and their oils that provide flavour or are used in the perfume industries for scent.


Quote:
Originally Posted by L00k4ward View Post

The monarda didyma or monarda fistulosa, etc - is NEVER used to make an Earl Grey tea.
Oh yes it is. In North American productions Early Grey and Lady Grey tea producers use monardas as substitutes for the flavouring because of the potential health hazards of the oil of Citrus Bergamia, also because the pure oil of Citrus Bergamia is prohibitively costly to import. And in Mexico and Brazil oil of sweet lime or bergamot mint (a variety of water mint) is used. In India, Germany and France a plant called Eau de Cologne mint a.k.a. lemon bee balm (a type of monarda) is often used as a substitute.


Quote:
Originally Posted by L00k4ward View Post

You could try it - it is non-drinkable.
That all depends on which cultivar of monarda is used for the flavouring, there are more than 50 cultivars to choose from and no two of them are identical in flavour or scent. There are new monarda cultivars being produced every year. The right cultivars taste quite delicious in teas and in foods, baked goods, and for edible flowers and there are no commercial restrictions on where any species of the monardas may be grown.

.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2022, 03:22 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,254 posts, read 2,729,473 times
Reputation: 4712
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Hockey; where to start? Well, having played junior "B" 60 years ago and having the Toronto 'Mapes' as my favourite team back in the days of Tim Horton, Eddie Shack, Davey Keon, Frank Mahovlich, Red Kelly, Bobby Baun, Carl Brewer and Johnny Bower only to watch as the "new" system of contract purchasing mean't they went off to wherever and you were looking at a whole bunch of different players from one season to the next in the now normal "We can buy a winning team complete with coaching staff" akin to any business model having nothing whatsoever to do with the original premise of "TEAM SPORTS" the last hockey I watched with any great interest was the '72' Canada vs Russia "summit series".
I remember those days. My Dad first took me to Maple Leaf Gardens when I was 6 or 7, and I saw Johnny Bower play--without a goalie mask. And those other guys too--see my Bob Baun memories below.

I would attend Leafs games at the Gardens many times subsequently.

Eddie Shack dated a girl on our street. He drove a big Cadillac convertible, and he'd interrupt our road hockey games--"Sorry, fellas, Zanboni coming through." We laughed, and he laughed, and he went on to pick up his date while we got back to our game.

Red Kelly--I knew his daughter Casey, and I was in his home, once or twice. I remember visiting once, and Red coming down the stairs, asking, "Casey, who's at the door?" Casey just replied, "It's Spoons, Dad." Red came down a couple of more stairs, looked, and said, "Oh, hi, Spoons. What're you kids doing today?"

And Bob Baun. He was a family friend, actually. I remember Bob telling us that he'd prepare dinner, and him in an apron in our kitchen, and his dinner was actually not too bad. Word to the wise: Bob likes Beefeater gin and tonics. The tonic water can be Canada Dry or Schweppe's, but it absolutely must be Beefeater gin.

I remember that Bob and I had cigars and brandy after dinner at Hy's in Calgary one night. Many great hockey stories from that conversation. A hefty bill, but it was worth it.

Other than that, Bob had plenty of stories about his time with the Maple Leafs. But my best memory of Bob is when I got to hold his 1967 Stanley Cup ring in my hand. How many here have ever held a Grey Cup, Super Bowl, Stanley Cup, or World Series ring, in their hands? Well, I have!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2022, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
81,696 posts, read 75,188,949 times
Reputation: 104550
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I thought squirrels were brown or red.
I actually saw a brownish squirrel out back last week. He looked "different". Do you have brown squirrels where you live?

Red squirrels are a smaller variety, and they have them up here. I never saw one in New Jersey, but my sister in Pennsylvania gets them.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2022, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
81,696 posts, read 75,188,949 times
Reputation: 104550
Quote:
Clean of litter
Just wanted to make a remark about that. Not always. When at the lake house, where I am now, I walk frequently along the road, which is mostly wooded on the one side with houses along the lake on the other. And all the time, I see Tim Horton's cups that were apparently thrown out the car window at the side of the road. There's also the occasional beer can, but less of that. It perplexes me that in such a beautiful spot, people would even be able to do that, but I guess if this is your home, it doesn't seem as special.

Of course, it could be the same person tossing his Tim Horton's cup every day...

I can't stand people littering, not here, not in New Jersey. There is no reason for it, none.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top