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Old 11-27-2023, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
5,010 posts, read 591,459 times
Reputation: 2667

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I have moral values such as compassion, empathy and kindness. I'm polite, say "sorry" a lot. It's viewed as a weakness, and I've been accused by Americans as being "naive about life".

And what's up with Americans thinking we all speak French? I also do not ever say "eh", nor do I like maple syrup...and we are not all beer-swilling, pot smoking hockey fans. Our politics are different. Weather - we are known for being a frigid wasteland Canada's healthcare system has it's pros and cons. We have our own culture, customs and traditions.

Just setting the record straight on what (some, not all) Americans get wrong about their northern neighbors.
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Old 11-27-2023, 01:26 PM
 
3,195 posts, read 1,662,548 times
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Most Canadians I've came across with are nice people and a bit of pushover I guess. Not tough like Americans are built.
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Old 11-27-2023, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,545,978 times
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Some certainly prove that their understanding of Canada is way off. Sometimes to the point of being absurd.

Some know a lot about Canada. Those are usually the ones that visit. A real visit and not just catching a cruise out of Vancouver kind of visit.

In general though, yes, most Americans I've met while IN the US have only stereotypes to go by. Some view Canada as some sort of utopia, others as some sort of socialist hell. Most don't really think about us until they meet you.

However I've found in my travels it's not just Americans, it's a worldwide thing.
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Old 11-27-2023, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Four Oaks
814 posts, read 443,347 times
Reputation: 2942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Some certainly prove that their understanding of Canada is way off. Sometimes to the point of being absurd.

Some know a lot about Canada. Those are usually the ones that visit. A real visit and not just catching a cruise out of Vancouver kind of visit.

In general though, yes, most Americans I've met while IN the US have only stereotypes to go by. Some view Canada as some sort of utopia, others as some sort of socialist hell. Most don't really think about us until they meet you.

However I've found in my travels it's not just Americans, it's a worldwide thing.
I would think that's about the same for any type of people that we don't have first hand experience with.

Two years ago I moved from NY/NJ to the rural areas south of Raleigh. You would (or wouldn't) be surprised at the "assumptions" of Southerners by Northeners. No, they are not bare foot and pregnant, low educated, ignorant Bumpkins. I've found the sweetest, and very sharp, people every where I go. I would never go back north.

Life is wonderful here in the south with a people who understand the meaning of respect, look out for each other, would stop and lend a hand to a stranger, and welcome you with a smile.

I think Canadians are just like anyone else. What you think others look at you like is mostly an assumption by both them and you until we all get an opportunity to meet each other. Then we get to realize that most people on this earth are really very much more alike than different.
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Old 11-27-2023, 02:56 PM
 
3,451 posts, read 2,779,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allthatglitters View Post
I have moral values such as compassion, empathy and kindness. I'm polite, say "sorry" a lot. It's viewed as a weakness, and I've been accused by Americans as being "naive about life".

And what's up with Americans thinking we all speak French? I also do not ever say "eh", nor do I like maple syrup...and we are not all beer-swilling, pot smoking hockey fans. Our politics are different. Weather - we are known for being a frigid wasteland Canada's healthcare system has it's pros and cons. We have our own culture, customs and traditions.

Just setting the record straight on what (some, not all) Americans get wrong about their northern neighbors.
Your name is allthatglitters, and you. ARE. CANADIAN!
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Old 11-27-2023, 05:23 PM
 
14,302 posts, read 11,688,680 times
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I've been to Canada several times (BC and the Maritimes) and found that Canadians came across as perfectly normal people. Some friendly, some a little aloof--honestly, Americans are the same.

I will say though, that while being polite is very good, if someone from any culture says "sorry" a lot it can get a little annoying. People don't have to apologize for every little thing. Saying sorry too much is viewed as a weakness by Americans because it comes across that someone who is always apologizing for something that is not their fault, or for asking someone to do their actual job, that sort of thing, has low self-esteem and is just asking to be kicked around.
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Old 11-27-2023, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
5,010 posts, read 591,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
......I will say though, that while being polite is very good, if someone from any culture says "sorry" a lot it can get a little annoying. People don't have to apologize for every little thing. Saying sorry too much is viewed as a weakness by Americans because it comes across that someone who is always apologizing for something that is not their fault, or for asking someone to do their actual job, that sort of thing, has low self-esteem and is just asking to be kicked around.
Sorry ā€” can we talk about why Canadians apologize so much?

https://www.cbc.ca/2017/sorry-can-we...much-1.3939997
Quote:
My favorite example of a Canadian apology is when you're out for brunch, or at a restaurant, and you really need some ketchup.

So you say to the waiter ā€” whose job it is to help you get the things you need to enjoy your meal ā€” "Oh, sorry! Um, sorry, hi! Is it okay if ā€¦ could I have some ketchup, please? Oh, thanks so much, sorry!"

It just makes no sense. You could just say: "Excuse me? Do you have any ketchup?"
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Old 11-27-2023, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,545,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I've been to Canada several times (BC and the Maritimes) and found that Canadians came across as perfectly normal people. Some friendly, some a little aloof--honestly, Americans are the same.

I will say though, that while being polite is very good, if someone from any culture says "sorry" a lot it can get a little annoying. People don't have to apologize for every little thing. Saying sorry too much is viewed as a weakness by Americans because it comes across that someone who is always apologizing for something that is not their fault, or for asking someone to do their actual job, that sort of thing, has low self-esteem and is just asking to be kicked around.
It may sound like that to your ears, but when two Canadians blurt out "sorry", when clearly one person hasn't done anything to be sorry about, that person doesn't feel they have low self esteem or are asking to be kicked around, and neither does the person who is at fault.

It's just a culture difference that you are misunderstanding. Just like it took me a bit of time to realize Americans weren't being rude when replying to my " thank-you " with an " uh huh ", which to Canadian ears sounds dismissive and uncaring.
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Old 11-27-2023, 05:50 PM
 
14,302 posts, read 11,688,680 times
Reputation: 39088
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It may sound like that to your ears, but when two Canadians blurt out "sorry", when clearly one person hasn't done anything to be sorry about, that person doesn't feel they have low self esteem or are asking to be kicked around, and neither does the person who is at fault.

It's just a culture difference that you are misunderstanding.
I personally was not misunderstanding, I was trying to explain how what seems like an unnecessary "sorry" can come across to the average American.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Just like it took me a bit of time to realize Americans weren't being rude when replying to my " thank-you " with an " uh huh ", which to Canadian ears sounds dismissive and uncaring.
Hmm. I think "uh-huh" as a response to "thank you" sounds borderline rude, and I'm American. More appropriate response are "You're welcome," "Sure!", "No problem," and "Of course"--this last being increasingly common among restaurant servers, I have noticed.
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Old 11-27-2023, 08:15 PM
 
2,056 posts, read 1,000,552 times
Reputation: 6210
Everything I know about Canadians I learned from Kids in the Hall. Probably the best show from the 90s!
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