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Old 12-21-2023, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Flawduh
17,148 posts, read 15,357,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
I'm just clarifying what CBSA says about the matter. There is a difference between what is advised and what is required. There is no Canadian law that requires US citizens to have a passport to enter Canada. There is no Canadian law that requires US citizens to have an enhanced driver's license to enter Canada. .

Your statement that the OP needs a passport is just plain false. It's recommended that he have one, not required. Why not just give the OP the correct information and let them decide for themselves what to use?

The only other options the OP has as a US citizen are:

- Enhanced DL -- Can't get one as a resident of NC

- NEXUS card: NEED PASSPORT upon first entry, as they need to scan it into their system. AFTER that, can travel with NEXUS card only.

- FAST card: I highly doubt that OP can get that.


This is the official list of "proper identification" for travelers driving into Canada from the US.

Yes, the OP needs a passport. There is no other proper form of identification they can get. Therefore, per CBSA, yes, the passport is required.

Last edited by Arcenal813; 12-21-2023 at 03:30 PM..
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Old 12-21-2023, 07:03 PM
 
100 posts, read 93,529 times
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How do the Cherokee cross from AB to MT when in pursuit of a bison? And back when being chased by same?
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Old 12-21-2023, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,528 posts, read 84,719,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
Okay requirements by country:



US citizens must carry proper identification such as a valid U.S. passport. You must have proper identification. A U.S. passport is recommended. That is pretty clear English, from an official source.

As was previously posted.
Yes, people from the border states that issue enhanced driver's licenses can present that in lieu of a passport except during the pandemic when additional.paperwork was required to approach the border.

But OK, tell Mr. North Carolina to roll up to the border without a passport and inform the CBSA Agent that he only "might" need one.

I have entered Canada about 40 times since 2017. I presented my passport.
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Last edited by Mightyqueen801; 12-21-2023 at 08:57 PM..
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Old 12-22-2023, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,624 posts, read 3,407,745 times
Reputation: 5555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
But OK, tell Mr. North Carolina to roll up to the border without a passport and inform the CBSA Agent that he only "might" need one.
And I have no doubt that if he does that, then the CBSA will, in polite Canadian fashion, direct Mr. North Carolina to the U-Turn lane back to the US, and give him a document that tells US authorities at the US checkpoint that he was not admitted to Canada; and thus, should not be subject to US Customs and Immigration inspection. End result: no admittance to Canada and sent back in the USA.

In the end, it's the CBSA officer on the ground who makes the final decision. Not information on a website. If the CBSA officer asks for a passport, you'd better provide one. If you have none (or another acceptable document, such as an enhanced driver's license from states that have them), you won't be admitted. It will be no use to argue with the CBSA officer at the checkpoint about what a website says; what that officer says on the spot at that time, goes.

As with so many other legal things, I suppose that decision is appealable. Come back in six to eight weeks and you can have your day in court.

Quote:
I have entered Canada about 40 times since 2017. I presented my passport.
You understand the worth of a passport. It is a universal identity document, basically, that says you are who you say you are, and that you are a citizen of the country that issued the passport. Look closely at the fine print within it--your passport remains the property of the issuing government. This allows your government to get involved if your passport is taken from you and not returned by another government. As you know, MQ, a passport is a powerful document, and is recognized and respected throughout the world. I've held a Canadian passport since I was 17; and while I've used it to travel internationally, it has also come in handy in foreign lands for buying alcohol, tobacco, and proving that I was old enough to gamble. It is the identity document that is irrefutable.

So I am puzzled by Americans who do not have one and do not want one. "Oh, it takes too much time," and "Oh, it costs too much," seem to be the most common reasons for not getting one. Then they want to come to Canada, and when told that they will need a passport, try to find any loophole that means that they don't need one. If they put as much time and effort into actually getting a passport as they do into arguing why they don't need one to come to Canada, they'd have a passport by now.

MQ, you and your US passport will be welcome in Canada any time. So will all the Americans who have US passports. But those without--nope, sorry. There's the U-Turn lane, see ya.

Last edited by ChevySpoons; 12-22-2023 at 02:11 AM..
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Old 12-22-2023, 04:51 AM
 
Location: NC
9,359 posts, read 14,093,349 times
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I appreciate all of the Polite responses. It is just one way the world has changed. I mentioned earlier that in the 70s and 80s most times no identification at all was required of me. At the most a normal driver’s license which probably had a photo.

My quandary was around needing the same documents for two different identification devices, Real ID and passport. But what the hay, it’s a sign of the times. It is what it is so a new passport will be sought.
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Old 12-22-2023, 05:30 AM
 
Location: ottawa, ontario, canada
2,393 posts, read 1,563,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grotte View Post
How do the Cherokee cross from AB to MT when in pursuit of a bison? And back when being chased by same?
on ATVs
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Old 12-22-2023, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,528 posts, read 84,719,546 times
Reputation: 115015
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
And I have no doubt that if he does that, then the CBSA will, in polite Canadian fashion, direct Mr. North Carolina to the U-Turn lane back to the US, and give him a document that tells US authorities at the US checkpoint that he was not admitted to Canada; and thus, should not be subject to US Customs and Immigration inspection. End result: no admittance to Canada and sent back in the USA.

In the end, it's the CBSA officer on the ground who makes the final decision. Not information on a website. If the CBSA officer asks for a passport, you'd better provide one. If you have none (or another acceptable document, such as an enhanced driver's license from states that have them), you won't be admitted. It will be no use to argue with the CBSA officer at the checkpoint about what a website says; what that officer says on the spot at that time, goes.

As with so many other legal things, I suppose that decision is appealable. Come back in six to eight weeks and you can have your day in court.

You understand the worth of a passport. It is a universal identity document, basically, that says you are who you say you are, and that you are a citizen of the country that issued the passport. Look closely at the fine print within it--your passport remains the property of the issuing government. This allows your government to get involved if your passport is taken from you and not returned by another government. As you know, MQ, a passport is a powerful document, and is recognized and respected throughout the world. I've held a Canadian passport since I was 17; and while I've used it to travel internationally, it has also come in handy in foreign lands for buying alcohol, tobacco, and proving that I was old enough to gamble. It is the identity document that is irrefutable.

So I am puzzled by Americans who do not have one and do not want one. "Oh, it takes too much time," and "Oh, it costs too much," seem to be the most common reasons for not getting one. Then they want to come to Canada, and when told that they will need a passport, try to find any loophole that means that they don't need one. If they put as much time and effort into actually getting a passport as they do into arguing why they don't need one to come to Canada, they'd have a passport by now.

MQ, you and your US passport will be welcome in Canada any time. So will all the Americans who have US passports. But those without--nope, sorry. There's the U-Turn lane, see ya.
I have heard stories of people so lacking in sense that when they were denied entry to Canada at one crossing, they drove to another, somehow not realizing it's the same computer system and CBSA agent No. 2 can see that another agent denied them entry three hours earlier--and then they were banned from approaching the border for one year. Same with arguing with the CBSA. Told not to bother trying to come into Canada for a year.

Then, during COVID, when I was part of a Facebook group working to allow cross-border couples to get an exemption to be able to reunite with their partners, there was one story of a couple, he American, she Canadian, who tried to go to Canada without following the established exemption process.

At the border, the man was denied access to Canada for not having the paperwork. They were told to make the U-turn--but then the US border guard denied the Canadian woman entry back into the USA.

She literally had to get out of the car and call someone to come pick her up at the border while her husband drove back home alone.

A passport is not so expensive that most Americans who want or need to travel outside the country can't afford one. It's $130 according to the website.
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Old 12-22-2023, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,528 posts, read 84,719,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
I appreciate all of the Polite responses. It is just one way the world has changed. I mentioned earlier that in the 70s and 80s most times no identification at all was required of me. At the most a normal driver’s license which probably had a photo.

My quandary was around needing the same documents for two different identification devices, Real ID and passport. But what the hay, it’s a sign of the times. It is what it is so a new passport will be sought.
Real ID has nothing to do with international travel, though, so it's not the same thing. That's for travel within the US only. A passport is for entry into other countries. However, you don't NEED the RealID if you have a passport, which you can use instead.

Yes, the world changed partly because of 9/11/01, partly because of technology. It took a while for new systems to be developed, but for 14 years now, a passport has been required to get into Canada.
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Old 12-22-2023, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
3,973 posts, read 5,765,155 times
Reputation: 4730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I have heard stories of people so lacking in sense that when they were denied entry to Canada at one crossing, they drove to another, somehow not realizing it's the same computer system and CBSA agent No. 2 can see that another agent denied them entry three hours earlier--and then they were banned from approaching the border for one year. Same with arguing with the CBSA. Told not to bother trying to come into Canada for a year.

Then, during COVID, when I was part of a Facebook group working to allow cross-border couples to get an exemption to be able to reunite with their partners, there was one story of a couple, he American, she Canadian, who tried to go to Canada without following the established exemption process.

At the border, the man was denied access to Canada for not having the paperwork. They were told to make the U-turn--but then the US border guard denied the Canadian woman entry back into the USA.

She literally had to get out of the car and call someone to come pick her up at the border while her husband drove back home alone.

A passport is not so expensive that most Americans who want or need to travel outside the country can't afford one. It's $130 according to the website.
That reminds me of a former part time coworker who was a retired airline worker. She told me of Americans who probably never traveled abroad before. They book an international flight, usually to some tropical destination like Cancun or Punta Cana, show up to the airport without passports, of course get denied boarding, and then cry and plead with words like "But it's our honeymoon!" or "It's our wedding anniversary!" to no avail. It is a wonder why so many Americans don't have passports and don't even bother to get one. Not to mention displaying obvious lack of international geographic knowledge as to think that Cancun and Punta Cana were the same as Key West, Florida. If it is an international destination, one needs a passport or if applicable, a WHTI document period. This rule even applies to some U.S. territories. Puerto Rico may let us mainland Americans in without a passport but not American Samoa.
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Old 12-22-2023, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
3,973 posts, read 5,765,155 times
Reputation: 4730
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
I appreciate all of the Polite responses. It is just one way the world has changed. I mentioned earlier that in the 70s and 80s most times no identification at all was required of me. At the most a normal driver’s license which probably had a photo.

My quandary was around needing the same documents for two different identification devices, Real ID and passport. But what the hay, it’s a sign of the times. It is what it is so a new passport will be sought.
As I mentioned before, if you have no interest in traveling the world, care only about this one road trip to Canada, and want to save money, then invest in the $30 passport card.
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