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Old 01-22-2024, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Saskatoon - Saskatchewan, Canada
826 posts, read 864,415 times
Reputation: 757

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With the stated goal of targeting institutional "bad actors" — and amid concern about the impact growing numbers of international students are having on the housing market — Immigration Minister Marc Miller announced on Monday that the federal government will cap the number for student visas to be granted over the next two years.

For 2024, the federal government says it will approve 360,000 undergraduate study permits, with the aim of reducing the number by 35 per cent from 2023.

Each province and territory will be allotted a portion of the total, with permits distributed by population. The federal government says this will result in "much more significant decreases in provinces where the international student population has seen the most unsustainable growth."

Provinces and territories will be left to decide how permits are distributed across universities and colleges in their jurisdiction. The cap will be in place for two years and the number of visas to be issued in 2025 will be reassessed at the end of this year.

"It's unacceptable that some private institutions have taken advantage of international students by operating under-resourced campuses, lacking supports for students and charging high tuition fees all the while significantly increasing their intake of international students," Miller said.

In addition to the cap, the federal government will also require international students applying for a permit to provide an attestation letter from a province or territory.

"To be absolutely clear, these measures are not against individual international students," Miller said. "They are to ensure that as future students arrive in Canada, they receive the quality of education that they signed up for and the hope that they were provided in their home countries."

Miller also announced changes to the post-graduation work permit program.

Starting in September, international students who begin a program that is part of a curriculum licensing arrangement — where a private college has been licensed to deliver the curriculum of an associated public college — will no longer be eligible for a post-graduation work permit. Graduates of master's and other "short graduate-level programs" will "soon" be able to apply for a three-year work permit. Open work permits will also only be made available to the spouses of international students in master's and doctoral programs.

The changes announced on Monday come a little over a month after Miller first announced measures intended to target what the minister described as "the diploma equivalent of puppy mills."

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/mil...ents-1.7090779
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Old 01-22-2024, 10:38 AM
 
Location: ottawa, ontario, canada
2,390 posts, read 1,560,434 times
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I don't think this alone will solve any shortage of housing immediately given a lot of students already here will be allowed to finish their diplomas, we will see approx. 190,000 fewer visas issued but more than likely restored in 2025/26

I suppose there is a lot of money to be made on the backs of these visiting students.
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Old 01-22-2024, 12:34 PM
 
1,219 posts, read 488,905 times
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It's not just about housing but alot of the student visas are actually just a scam. The scams need to be stopped. Canada is not the only country having issues with this but it is one of the most targeted country, if not the most.
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Old 01-22-2024, 07:58 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,090,748 times
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I think it’s the right move. I hope it doesn’t get reversed with loopholes like the foreign buyers ban. The vast majority of international students are attending college diploma programs, many of which are run by shady “diploma mills” as they’re called. People attending universities shouldn’t be affected and this should limit the number of college students to those pursuing diplomas that will translate to skilled jobs in Canada rather than the easiest program to coast through while working full time on a study permit. I’m all for international students coming here for our best universities, it just doesn’t make sense to have like 80% attending college diploma/certificate programs on the scale that it exists now. Hopefully the provinces will fund their colleges better so the hit to enrolment/tuition revenue doesn’t cripple them financially. I imagine the administration at these colleges is throwing a fit right now.
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Old 01-25-2024, 03:56 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,090,748 times
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https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/...fab49b297.html
What a shock, the colleges are already complaining about it /s.
They don’t want the cash cow that is expensive international student tuitions to stop. Expect Dougie and the other premiers to get behind this reversal push. Then we’ll probably see PP make reversing this an election promise under the guise of “provincial autonomy” or some garbage.
God forbid we do anything at all to alleviate the housing crisis that’s impacting 2 entire generations of Canadians.
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Old 01-25-2024, 06:20 PM
 
1,219 posts, read 488,905 times
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I see there is pusch back against this from certain groups calling this racist.
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Old 01-25-2024, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,676 posts, read 5,521,274 times
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I don’t know anything about Alex Usher, CEO of Higher Education Strategy Associates, but this is what he predicts in his blog:

What Comes Next

The Easy Provinces (Newfoundland, Saskatchewan, Quebec, Alberta)
Quote:
These are the provinces where the expected cap exceeds current visa uptake by a significant margin. The imposition of the new caps/distribution will mean almost nothing in these provinces as the number of available spots remains high.
The Borderline Provinces (New Brunswick, Manitoba)
Quote:
These are two provinces where the number of current spots more or less equals the new cap. I suspect what both will do is simply freeze permits at something very close to current numbers and distributions. Easiest decision imaginable.
The Problematic Provinces (British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island)
Quote:
Now it starts to get complicated, because we’re into the provinces where some institutions will inevitably lose spots. Governments might simply drop everyone’s existing numbers proportionately, but they may also be tempted to try to achieve other goals with their rationing strategy.
Ontario (the hugely problematic province)
Quote:
Ontario is, not to put too fine a point on it, a **** show. My impression is that the Ford government, which has been throwing gasoline on the international student fire ever since it got into the office, mainly so it could avoid having to actually spend over its own money on post-secondary education, is in no way equipped policy-wise to deal with the mess it has just been handed.
See article for more commentary.
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Old 01-27-2024, 07:50 AM
 
Location: In the heights
37,127 posts, read 39,337,475 times
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Seems like a step in the right direction, but I think it should be done with legislation that particularly targets the scams because otherwise the lower quota might actually disproportionately affect students who come to actually learn and do research and potentially become competent workers and entrepreneurs rather than the scams where their primary objective is to find ways around things like this.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; 01-27-2024 at 08:10 AM..
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Old 01-27-2024, 09:34 AM
 
1,219 posts, read 488,905 times
Reputation: 760
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Seems like a step in the right direction, but I think it should be done with legislation that particularly targets the scams
I agree but the government would have to create a new special task force to focus solely on that. The issue is grave. There would also be resistance from certain increasingly powerful groups and accusations of racism.
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Old 01-27-2024, 11:37 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,090,748 times
Reputation: 1820
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Seems like a step in the right direction, but I think it should be done with legislation that particularly targets the scams because otherwise the lower quota might actually disproportionately affect students who come to actually learn and do research and potentially become competent workers and entrepreneurs rather than the scams where their primary objective is to find ways around things like this.
In Ontario there’s tiers of these programs. There’s 1 year certificates, 2 year diplomas and 3 or 4 year advanced diplomas from what I’ve heard from friends and acquaintances. Certificates could be useful for things like the trades, etc so people with a background in those fields can familiarize themselves with Canadian standards. It makes more sense maybe to gear these to jobs with major employers experiencing labour shortages.

Other than that though, a lot of these diplomas are pretty useless outside of Canada. I may be wrong but I don’t think a 2 year business diploma from a Canadian public college is going to get you a job in India, so what’s the rationale of expanding enrolment so drastically to accommodate students who don’t have PR yet? The schools are probably pissed because they’ve expanded their campuses so much, so we should find a way to fund them properly and the schools should sell or pivot some of their facilities to better suit domestic needs. I’m personally fine paying higher taxes if it means we have a better educated, more skilled labour force in the future. It’ll raise my standard of living indirectly as well if the economy grows because of investments we make now.
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