U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
32,336 posts, read 18,367,370 times
Reputation: 22512

Advertisements

There is an American system. Unlike schools in much of the rest of the world, including Latin America which uses the European model, American schools teach a full subject in one semester or year (with the exception of foreign languages, obviously, and literature). Chemistry is covered in one year in HS. Similarly geometry, US history, geography, biology and other sciences. In Canadian and European schools, all those subjects are spread out over years, so there's more variety in the weekly curriculum than in the US, and skills/concepts are introduced gradually and expanded upon over years. It's not unusual for US students graduating from HS to not have advanced science at all, only biology. I wonder if Canadian schools are having similar problems with graduating students who are illiterate as some of the US public schools are.

In any case, back when I was applying to colleges, I was told by the University of British Columbia that I would require a 13th year (i.e. one year of college in the US) before I could be accepted as an incoming freshman at UBC. There were students in my school who had spent a year or two in European schools who were skipped ahead a year when they returned to US schools. It could be, though, that a lot has changed in Canada since the 90's. I've been out of the loop the last decade or so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-25-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: London, UK & Doha, Qatar
1,753 posts, read 1,205,347 times
Reputation: 1141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
There is an American system. Unlike schools in much of the rest of the world, including Latin America which uses the European model, American schools teach a full subject in one semester or year (with the exception of foreign languages, obviously, and literature). Chemistry is covered in one year in HS. Similarly geometry, US history, geography, biology and other sciences. In Canadian and European schools, all those subjects are spread out over years, so there's more variety in the weekly curriculum than in the US, and skills/concepts are introduced gradually and expanded upon over years. It's not unusual for US students graduating from HS to not have advanced science at all, only biology. I wonder if Canadian schools are having similar problems with graduating students who are illiterate as some of the US public schools are.

In any case, back when I was applying to colleges, I was told by the University of British Columbia that I would require a 13th year (i.e. one year of college in the US) before I could be accepted as an incoming freshman at UBC. There were students in my school who had spent a year or two in European schools who were skipped ahead a year when they returned to US schools. It could be, though, that a lot has changed in Canada since the 90's. I've been out of the loop the last decade or so.
School systems vary greatly between States. The Curriculum in Massachusetts for example is considerably different than Arizona or a host of other states. There are standards set at the Federal level, but waivers are granted to States that allow them to make significant adjustments. So its impossible to paint it all with one brush. I also attended high school in the 90's, so this is based on that decade.

All I know is that when I graduated from High School in Miami I went directly to an Ivy League School (Columbia) and had no issues at all. UBC is an excellent school, but could they honestly say they have that much higher of a standard than Columbia? Also there were Canadian students at Columbia as well and they did not seem any "Brighter" than the rest of us.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2012, 11:11 PM
 
994 posts, read 937,885 times
Reputation: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Canadian education is based on the European model. So it's organized completely differently, and more subjects are covered, it's more thorough, and more advanced. American students by comparison are a year behind European and Canadian students, and that's students from good American schools. American schools teach a single subject in a semester or a year (geometry, history, biology) whereas by the European/Canadian system, all subject (biology, chemistry, math, etc.) are taught as a continuum over several years. A wider variety of subjects is covered in the European system.
I don't know to what European system you are comparing the "Canadian" education system (which varies widely from province to province), but when I started at a Canadian high school after spending some time in an unnamed European system, I was a full two years ahead of my peers in that particular provincial system in math and the sciences. It was an eye-opener to me. Even as a kid, I knew something was seriously wrong with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2012, 10:24 AM
 
15 posts, read 71,379 times
Reputation: 27
I am not sure who Ruth4Truth is or where the State of Righteous Indignation is but I think Ruth is maybe a little out-dated on her inforamtion, as she acknowledges, and also a bit indignant in lieu of being informative

She is correct about the different approaches which Math and Science are taught in the US vs. Canada which is why it's so important for US ex Pats to understand that there kids often come back after a few years in Canadian Elementary, and are disadvantaged in the US curriculum. I have many comments about the usefulness of teaching multiple maths disciplines over the year (algebra, geometry, stats, basic functions) as they do in Canada vs. the US's specialization. The issue with spreading out the concepts is that the previous material is often forgotten when advancing onto the next level of concepts, as other non related concepts had been introduced. Thus there is significant re-teaching. Additionnnally Canadian High Schoolers take far fewer classes per sememster than US students so a child may have Math the first semester of their Grade 9 year and not again until the 2nd semester of their Grade 10 year, an entire year later. This is not ideal for many students. ANd where Ruth thinks most students leave HS with only Biology is absurd. Most take Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry at a minimum and most likely Physics or Anatomy or another specialized or AP science

Finally Ruth's statement about US illiteracy is just an example of her bias and lack of understanding of the sytems. Ruth is out of date on her understanding of the two systems and I advise US exPats to do more extensive research to ensure their children are prepared to return to the US system if they are educated out of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2012, 03:59 PM
 
349 posts, read 507,627 times
Reputation: 163
I have not found any real difference with my 13 year old in any subject. Math classes in Highschool in Ontario are discipline-specific and there is a mix taught here (NJ) up until the end of grade 7, then it switches to specific concentrations. Classes in highschool in Ontario are also done by term, each term teaching different subjects, just like here. In both places, the kids are informed that they need to think about where they want to go post-secondary and choose their classes accordingly.

As I have no experience with other states, I can only state what I know. But just know that the generalizations comparing "American" and "Canadian" educational differences do not hold true all of the time. Everyone will just have to look at the specific school area they are moving to in order to determine what the differences are in terms of quality of education and what is taught.

The only difference that my son has found between his schooling in Canada and the US is that, in his words, "The kids here swear a lot more."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2012, 04:02 PM
 
349 posts, read 507,627 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
When we originally moved from the West Indies to Toronto though, we found ourselves considerably ahead of our classmates in Toronto. Most Caribbean children who have emigrated will tell you the exact same thing.
The West Indies seems to place a much greater importance on schooling in the younger years. In Trinidad, there are educational quizzes in the newspaper for kids to do and they post the Honor Rolls and such. It's wonderful to see. I often wonder, seeing how great the schooling is there, why people often send their kids to the US/Canada for education (my husband's parents did this), but I guess it has to do more with increased opportunities than the quality of the education.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 07:32 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,476 times
Reputation: 10
Default UBC from US Educational System

I'm looking to apply to UBC Vancouver in the coming months for the Winter 2013 entry. I'm a Canadian citizen but enrolled in an American high school system.

-My unweighted GPA is 3.93 and weighted is 5.25.
-My SAT's aren't too great, about 2200
-Grades included on transcript average out to 95.8% up until junior year (using final scores)

Extracurriculars:
-Science Olympiad tournaments since 2006
-Varsity sport team captain since 2009
-Symphony Orchestra since 2009
-Community service since 2010 (500 hours)
-President/ Founder of Organization raising money for children's hospital since 2011

I've taken 11 AP courses (each with 4's and 5's:
-World History
-US History
-Calculus BC
-Statistics
-Chemistry
-Biology
-Microeconomics
-Psychology
-English Language/ Composition
-English Literature/ Composition
-Computer Science

Also, what is the supplementary application that everyone keeps on talking about for applying undergraduate to UBC?

Any help and opinions would be greatly appreciated regarding on getting accepted into UBC, my primary choice of schools. If possible, could anyone with insight please tell me how I will look for University of Toronto St. George and McGill University?

Thanks!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 08:04 PM
 
Location: The Village
5,773 posts, read 2,152,264 times
Reputation: 2861
Quote:
I'm looking to apply to UBC Vancouver in the coming months for the Winter 2013 entry. I'm a Canadian citizen but enrolled in an American high school system.
Despite your Canadian citizenship you will be applying as an international student and paying higher fees. Check the admissions page for international students at UBC and others. Your odds of acceptance are dependent on the school and program you are applying for. Unlike US universities you don't get a general admission then apply for your program in the 2nd or 3rd year - your initial application is for a specific program.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 08:09 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,476 times
Reputation: 10
Sorry. I forgot to mention I was applying to the Faculty of Science.

Could you perhaps give more personalized responses, as I have no idea what the standards are, despite having explored every part of their website.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2013, 08:59 PM
 
1 posts, read 405 times
Reputation: 12
As a former teacher here in the US I can tell you what is wrong - the UNIONS have become WAAAAAY too influential in our system and consequently schools are unable to fire teachers who do not belong in the school. The unions contribute millions of dollars to the Democrat party and teachers in general subsequently vote democrat so it makes it nearly impossible. Another problem with our system is we spend too little time on math, science, history, etc., and waaaay too much time on what I call "touchy-feely" political correctness subjects. I have heard from many college educators that students graduating high school ar unable to even write a decent term paper. Punctuation and grammatical errors, as well as spelling, are no longer corrected in our schools "because we don't want to harm the psyche of the child!" I used to sit in these meetings unable to believe the crazy things that come out of these far-left teachers mouths. Towards the end I felt all I saw happening in my school was the children being programmed to be future democrat voters. There was an astronomical amount of time spent on political commentary that has little to no place in kids who are too young to understand the full ramifications of the various subject matter. After retiring I spent time in the Ukraine and in South America and was so saddened to see how superior their schools were to our American schools. American schools are now more about teachers who only care about their pay, their benefits and their retirement and if you think I'm kidding then you're out of touch with the facts. If I were a new parent in this day and age I would be seriously considering moving out of the U.S. in order to give my children the best education possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top