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Old 03-10-2012, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Ka-nah-da
254 posts, read 251,591 times
Reputation: 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by larkas View Post
Well my mothers family is Canadian, they live in the city but my grandma moved to the u.s. when my mom was 15. My wish is to be able to finish my masters then move because I'm a linguist, but I want to finish school to be a computational linguist. Luckily I can do this job solely on a computer, I'm interning now and already have my sights set on a company. So no, I do have a plan haha. I actually want to move my mother and I (and baby! ) to a farm area (she'd have a separate house on the land). I have always wanted to have fresh foods and raise a sustainable home. The father situation is sad so I won't tell it, but I really want to chase this dream so I'm trying to really get a sense how it is for children raised there, how is the farm area ( you know I'm having a hard time putting this in to words, so bear with me- people in the u.s., generally view these people as either "hickish" or just "odd" sometimes, is it similar in Canada?) considered among the general population? Just trying to get a sense before I start visiting there. thanks though!
Canada is a large country, but I get what you are saying. People living the rural life might be thought of as being more "hickish" in certain provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan for example. BC tends to be more diverse than some other provinces, but we still do have our areas of "hickishness", in BC I'm thinking Chilliwack, Mission, Aldergrove and Hope. I have never lived out east so I can't comment on the rest of Canada. I do think that American's tend to be more "pushy" with their religions than Canadians are, there are lots of religious people here, but for some reason or another we don't feel the need to display it.
I understand completely about wanting to live a simple self sustainable life, it's a dream my husband and I have as well. Ideally we'd love to buy some land in South Western BC, it's too expensive though....
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Old 03-10-2012, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Canada
2,891 posts, read 2,321,441 times
Reputation: 4767
Quote:
Originally Posted by larkas View Post
Well my mothers family is Canadian, they live in the city but my grandma moved to the u.s. when my mom was 15. My wish is to be able to finish my masters then move because I'm a linguist, but I want to finish school to be a computational linguist. Luckily I can do this job solely on a computer, I'm interning now and already have my sights set on a company. So no, I do have a plan haha. I actually want to move my mother and I (and baby! ) to a farm area (she'd have a separate house on the land). I have always wanted to have fresh foods and raise a sustainable home. The father situation is sad so I won't tell it, but I really want to chase this dream so I'm trying to really get a sense how it is for children raised there, how is the farm area ( you know I'm having a hard time putting this in to words, so bear with me- people in the u.s., generally view these people as either "hickish" or just "odd" sometimes, is it similar in Canada?) considered among the general population? Just trying to get a sense before I start visiting there. thanks though!
It would help to know what kind of weather you'd be prepared to endure and what you consider rural. It might also be helpful to know what state you are currently in, so posters can respond with more accurate comparisons.

Children are raised here pretty much as they are raised in the US, except maybe a little more low-key. As far as hicks are concerned, there are no doubt communities here that are more hickish than others but without a specific province or area of interest mentioned, it would be hard for anyone to tell you anything.

And then I would wonder what you consider to be hick-like or odd behaviour.

I live on a farm in Manitoba, which is not most immigrants first choice of a place to move to. My husband is a retired university professor - there are other educated people in my town. I am sure there are people here who haven't travelled much, but I don't know of any who haven't travelled at least to Mexican resorts. So there is a world view here - it's not like everyone thinks this is the centre of the known universe.

This is a relatively conservative area but once again, conservative means something different here than it appears to mean in the States. Although it is a relatively religious community, my husband and I don't go to church, and there are many other people around here who don't either and no one looks at us funny and other than a couple of Jehovah Witnesses showing up at the door 20 years ago, no one has ever tried to tell us we're damned.

Unfortunately we were not able to have children, but kids here play baseball, are in sports teams, go on school trips and some of them go on to university.

It's likely that a newcomer will be invited to church by someone who goes to church, but I've not heard of anyone taking offence at anyone not taking them up on the offer.

There's more crime than there used to be, and most of the drugs available in cities are available here too. The main drug here, as far as I know, is marijuana. Every now and then there's a bust on a grow-op somewhere in the region. I haven't heard of meth here, or an Oxycontin problem. Most crime still consists of kids burning a bale or two on Halloween night. If your car breaks down, someone will stop and help you.

I would say that people here know their city manners and wouldn't go to town sucking on a straw and wearing their barn boots.

But that doesn't mean that there aren't communities out there somewhere where things are different. I can only relate my experience in my location.

If you have more specific questions, I'm happy to answer them, either here or on DM.
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Old 03-11-2012, 01:38 AM
 
Location: Calgary, AB
485 posts, read 1,397,021 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by janacanada View Post
Canada is a large country, but I get what you are saying. People living the rural life might be thought of as being more "hickish" in certain provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan for example. BC tends to be more diverse than some other provinces, but we still do have our areas of "hickishness", in BC I'm thinking Chilliwack, Mission, Aldergrove and Hope. I have never lived out east so I can't comment on the rest of Canada. I do think that American's tend to be more "pushy" with their religions than Canadians are, there are lots of religious people here, but for some reason or another we don't feel the need to display it.
I understand completely about wanting to live a simple self sustainable life, it's a dream my husband and I have as well. Ideally we'd love to buy some land in South Western BC, it's too expensive though....
To be completely honest with you, outside of Toronto, Montreal and downtown Vancouver you will encounter "hickishness" to varying degrees all across Canada. By that, I mean lack of a cultured cosmopolitan lifestyle.

One of the major differences between Canada and the US is our stronger trades education system. We have a resource (and manufacturing, somewhat) based economy so it is more important here I suppose. Our "hicks" and our middle class in general are financially better off than comparable folks in the US.

Do you run into overcompensating guys who spend half their paycheck on their pickup truck (chrome, lift kit, etc.) and the other half on booze, drugs, pitbulls, snowmobiles and travel to the next UFC fight? Yes, most definitely. I would refer to them as d-bags as opposed to "hicks" but the new money easy come/easy go ethic is all the same and very present in every town in Canada. Oil culture has changed Western Canada in the last 10 years or so. But just like the guy in the city with a convertible sports car and a coke habit, two sides of the same coin.

Can you live your own life in rural Canada? Yes, most definitely. I'd stay from some places such as Medicine Hat if enlightenment is your goal though.
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Old 03-11-2012, 04:18 AM
 
19,375 posts, read 13,792,407 times
Reputation: 13134
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Lol Jambo, that's a four year old post, our question comes from the lady who posted above you.

.


I cant tell you how many times i get suckered into responding to ancient topics..
Not sure why member Larkus didnt just start a new topic rather than dragging up a 4 year old topic.

Larkus check out southwestern Ontario west of Kitchener/Waterloo area plenty of small communities all the way to Windsor and you wouldnt be out of place on a small country property.
A map of the area i'm thinking of =

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ll=...532104&t=m&z=8

Last edited by jambo101; 03-11-2012 at 04:27 AM..
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:00 AM
 
6,386 posts, read 1,968,677 times
Reputation: 3410
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post


I cant tell you how many times i get suckered into responding to ancient topics..
Not sure why member Larkus didnt just start a new topic rather than dragging up a 4 year old topic.

Larkus check out southwestern Ontario west of Kitchener/Waterloo area plenty of small communities all the way to Windsor and you wouldnt be out of place on a small country property.
A map of the area i'm thinking of =

Google Maps

Common phenonoma, to be cruising the older threads and see one you relate to, then reactivate it through posting a question you thought no one else had already asked. I don't always look to see the date of origin either.

Answering those type of queries is instinctual and not unusual either. No reason to beat yourself up over it.
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Old 03-12-2012, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,102 posts, read 9,384,298 times
Reputation: 3451
By any measure, Canada is an *excellent* place to raise children. One of the best places in the world without a doubt.
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Old 03-12-2012, 10:58 PM
 
178 posts, read 179,990 times
Reputation: 204
A good reason to answer old threads. People read the answers and find the helpful or interesting! I just did. My ancestors once lived in the area jambo101 described. Acajack answering today made me click too!
I was so delighted to hear a little background information. I browse Canada more because I daydream once in awhile about moving somewhere in CA, but also love to visit now and then.
Bye the way, I agree with the comment on an excellent place to raise children. I have some contact with 3rd cousins and they seem to have been quite successful with theirs! (My husband and I are quite delighted with ours too! Here in the US.) Anyway thanks to all. I am glad our countries are so close.
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:43 PM
 
4 posts, read 8,052 times
Reputation: 15
wow that was super helpful! thank you so much BIMBAM and ajau. I'm starting to pack for my first trip to Ontario, I'm technically visiting a friend in NY but hey Ontario is only two hours away! I'm actually going to visit a small family called Millview Farm. They just started a family farm so I figure Ill at least get some awesome tips. Again, thank you so much.
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