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Old 01-12-2009, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
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I was just wondering if USA coins worked in your vending machines. It is the only problem I ever run into when getting a Canadian coin.
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Old 01-12-2009, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GloryB View Post
I was just wondering if USA coins worked in your vending machines. It is the only problem I ever run into when getting a Canadian coin.
I believe U.S. coins do work in Canadian vending machines.
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Old 01-12-2009, 06:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GloryB View Post
I was just wondering if USA coins worked in your vending machines. It is the only problem I ever run into when getting a Canadian coin.

US coins work fine in vending machines. I tend to have more of a problem with newer Canadian quarters being rejectd by older changer mechanisms. Apparently it has something to do with a redesigned quarter weighing a little less.
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Old 01-12-2009, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by Cornerguy1 View Post
US coins work fine in vending machines. I tend to have more of a problem with newer Canadian quarters being rejectd by older changer mechanisms. Apparently it has something to do with a redesigned quarter weighing a little less.
Good point. You reminded me that I often have trouble getting *Canadian* vending machines to accept *Canadian* coins!
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Old 01-12-2009, 08:02 PM
 
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Well I am from Canada, from Victoria BC, but haven't been to the US much and then haven't experienced the discrimination against us as regards to currency and exchange rates. But maybe here is a partial answer as to why they do it. I will just pull a little of the web and you can add your understanding to that, but firstly, the change in the exchange rate must be the first cause, for the Canadian dollar isn't on par with the US, has been above it but for the last twenty years behind it most of the time, a very variable affair. The American dollar has always been the leader for the last 50 years and continues to pull almost 66% of the world behind it, the Euro being only number two (by far at 24% only by now I add give it time) compared to all other countries in the world today, it runs by weighting as such, the Euro 58%, the Yen 14%, Pound sterling 12%, Canadan dollar 9%, Swedish krona 4% and the Swiss franc at 4% approximately, that pulled from wikipedia from this link:

United States dollar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What are coins and paper made of and based upon? Another good question, even though as most movies and sources tell us the real coinage is the amount of gold stacked up against the currencies in circulation, and other metals, though gold is the leader and even though platinum is more expensive, that one type of precious metal the equation of the balance at the end of the day....

But to quote further from two sources on the coinage, and Canada hasn't had a one-dollar or a two-dollar paper note, not for some time now, why, they just last longer; so withour urls then from wikipedia and firstly about the US cent:

"Both the US cents before 1982 and all US nickels have a metal content at market worth more than face value of the coins. As of December 16, 2008, the US nickel has $0.06013 in metal content; all circulating US nickels carry a 20.3% premium over face value in metal content metal at market prices. The intrinsic value of pre-1982 US cents, weighing 3.11 grams, are worth $0.02414, 141.4% above face value in metal content at market prices. However, post-1982 US cents, which weigh 2.5 grams, are 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper (coated over the zinc) by weight. These have an intrinsic value of $0.00508 as of June 13, 2008, or 49.2% less than face value."

One finds that throughout the centuries, from 1792 to the present the value of the coinage, which originally had to be of precious metal or gold, or silver or copper has changed considerably, hence one of the questions in one of the previous blog answers as to weight and do they even work in our machines or ours in theirs. Well, for one here in Canada, I have had phone machines that have refused to work consistently against certain quarters for one, showing the subtle balance of the weights and measures.

As for Canada the coinage is also interesting in its content and just an example of its history, also from wiki, here, some editing on the quote below:

Coins of the Canadian dollar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

"The percentage of silver in silver coins was reduced in 1920 from 92.5% to 80%, and to 50% in 1967,[4] when production of dollar and half-dollar coins for circulation was stopped.[4] In 1968, the dime and quarter changed to 50% silver, while in August, all were replaced by pure nickel ones of the same size or (in the case of the 50¢ and $1)[4] nearly so. The rising price of nickel eventually forced the 5¢ coin (commonly called the "nickel") to be changed to cupro-nickel in 1982.
At about the same time the 1¢ coin was twice made smaller, and in 1997 it was changed to copper-plated zinc. Finally, in 2000 all coins below $1 were changed to steel with copper or nickel plating. Unfortunately, there have been some problems with compatibility between the new coins and coin-operated devices like vending machines and public telephones. The 50¢ piece is regularly minted, but not in large quantities; it is very rare to come across this coin in circulation, although an unsuccessful attempt was made by the Mint to promote the use of the coin when a special edition was released in 2002 marking the 50th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II ascending the throne."

For exact technical specifications on the metal compositions throughout history on the Canadian one-cent, is this site as well:

Technical Aspects - Canadian Circulating Coinage


Interesting reading isn't it, adds to the righteous bags of pure balances of measures for sure, and, it did validate my early view on the phone machines and because zinc is toxic don't allow your dog or child to put or swallow a penny into its belly....

Last edited by ZVCPT9; 01-12-2009 at 08:17 PM..
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Old 01-16-2009, 10:20 AM
 
Location: mass
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Originally Posted by brokendolly View Post
All the time but then I live close to the border. I've probably seen more US Sacagawea dollar coins than the average US citizen.

Canadians have always accepted US coin although most of the time in my experience it hasn't been reciprocated. I was once in L.A. buying some clothes and I mistakenly gave a Canadian penny to the clerk and she created a huge scene. For a penny. I walked away without the purchase. She lost a rather large sale.
I live in Massachusetts and periodically see Canadian coins, and as I get them I spend them. I've never had a clerk not take my Canadian coin. Not with pennies either and considering the amount I've rolled, I am sure there were some Canadians in there.
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Old 01-16-2009, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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In Canada American coins are taken at par, as if they're a Canadian coin, which is why you see them much more frequently in Canada. Also, Americans have a tendency to use American dollars in Canada (and practically any other country they travel to), hence there being more American coins.

However, I've actually read that Canadian coins are magnetized while American coins are not, so while perhaps some vending machines will accept American coins, there are equally as many that don't.
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Old 01-22-2009, 12:15 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,832,449 times
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Originally Posted by Cornerguy1 View Post
US coins work fine in vending machines. I tend to have more of a problem with newer Canadian quarters being rejectd by older changer mechanisms. Apparently it has something to do with a redesigned quarter weighing a little less.
I used to run the vending operation in a Detroit hospital with a large Canadian presence. On a lot of the older vending machines, you could set the changer to accept or reject Canadian coins. We let them accept the Canadian coins even with a 30% premium. We did NOT advertise or encourage it,

We never encountered any difficulties with a stray Canadian quarter or penny. On the other hand, I think that it is unreasonable to expect the bank to take Canadian coin in quantity at par when they are not close.

In general, Canadians will accept US currency anywhere near the border and will give a fair exchange rate (+/- 2% of the market rates). The only time that I was really shafted was in Halifax.
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I recently lived in Michigan, about 200 miles from the Canadian border. Every time I went to my bank to get a roll of quarters for the laundromat, there was always at least one Canadian quarter in there, that the dryer would/t accept. But I could spend it anywhere, and no clerk every paid any attention to it.
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Old 01-23-2009, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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For what it's worth, I sorted through all my spare coins today (that have been accumulating in one of those old fashioned big glass juice jugs) - we're talking cups and cups full of coins. Out of the entire jug's worth of Canadian coins, I pulled maybe a quarter cup of American coins, most of which were pennies, although some were quarters and dimes. Stranger yet was that I found 2 British pennies, though copper in colour, are a bit bigger than American and Canadian pennies.
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