U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-10-2009, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Queens THE REAL international city
2,386 posts, read 5,451,267 times
Reputation: 2826

Advertisements

Okay,

I remember if you were an American citizen all you needed to get into Canada was your birth certificate and valid ID stating you're a citizen of America.

I was wondering if its still like that now or have the rules change and you need a passport to get in?

I know it sounds silly to ask but I do want to know and be safe.


Thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-10-2009, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
2,177 posts, read 2,915,080 times
Reputation: 5851
If you are going and returning by car to Canada prior to June 1, 2009, you do not need a passport but you will need government issued ID (drivers license, birth certificate, etc). If you are flying to Canada, you will need a passport even before 6/1/09. I cross the border very often and I suggest that you go ahead and get the passport. It will make your crossing less stressful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Queens THE REAL international city
2,386 posts, read 5,451,267 times
Reputation: 2826
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlightAttendant View Post
If you are going and returning by car to Canada prior to June 1, 2009, you do not need a passport but you will need government issued ID (drivers license, birth certificate, etc). If you are flying to Canada, you will need a passport even before 6/1/09. I cross the border very often and I suggest that you go ahead and get the passport. It will make your crossing less stressful.

Okay. I plan on going by train or bus though. They'll eventually stop the train or bus to check passengers right?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 12,303,845 times
Reputation: 10014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lital_The_Best View Post
Okay. I plan on going by train or bus though. They'll eventually stop the train or bus to check passengers right?
Count upon it. I would just get the passport process moving ASAP. Even before June, I think you're apt to get far less less flak entering Canada with a passport than you would with a driver's license. I base this on the last time I entered Canada, at the Sumas/Abbotsford (WA/BC) crossing:

"What are your citizenships?" scowled the Customs Canada officer. (I was surprised. I'd never been scowled at by a Canadian border guard in my life. My own fellow Americans, every time; the Canadians, never. How times change.)

"United States," we replied politely.

"How do I know that?" he snipped, as though we were lying.

"We have our passports, sir," I answered.

At that point, because we unhesitatingly produced passports to show, we had a ready answer for the question. A driver's license wouldn't serve as an answer to that question. I think he was a little disappointed that we actually did have passports, because his attitude suggested that he would be quite glad to give us a hassle if we gave him any excuse, and having a ready answer to his question kind of nerfed that.

While he asked us the usual questions and more, in the end there was nothing suspicious about us or our answers, and he sent us on our way. The slightest bit of lip, of course, would have seen us either turned inside out, refused entry, or turned inside out then refused entry.

Now, suppose we had just had our WDLs to show him. Now he has a reason to ask us if we brought our birth certificates, which he is well within his rights to expect us to bring. It is, of course, his country and he's manning the gates; his question about our citizenships is valid and he doesn't have to take our word for it, any more than he has to believe me when I tell him we are not carrying any handguns, surface-to-air missiles, 81mm mortars or phosgene. He can opt to verify anything he wants. If we also don't have our birth certificates, then he is within his rights to suspect we're entering Canada under false pretenses. We may have a bad day, even though our only plans in Canada are to spend money, enjoy natural beauty, be courteous to everyone and obey every law in sight.

Thus. Get a passport. If you produce that, Customs Canada is inclined to believe that the US government believes you're a US citizen. If you have that, and refuse to be baited by questions that challenge your integrity, and there is no other reason (prior criminal record, for example) to keep you out, they won't send you back. Best behavior: 'yes, sir/ma'am,' 'no, sir/ma'am,' 'here it is, sir/ma'am,' direct answers without hesitation or elaboration. Behave as if you've been stopped by the cops on the highway, because essentially, you have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 01:55 PM
 
175 posts, read 1,510,812 times
Reputation: 185
I am not sure what some of you are complaining about. the US obviously has even stricters rules when it comes to entering its border.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 12,303,845 times
Reputation: 10014
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanusc View Post
I am not sure what some of you are complaining about. the US obviously has even stricters rules when it comes to entering its border.
Speaking just for me, I'm not complaining. In the past, getting back into my own country was by far more agitating than leaving it for Canada, and I think I clearly acknowledged Customs Canada's right to be as strict as they choose, whether as retaliation, or for any reason or no reason. I was just helping the OP understand what to expect and how to handle it so s/he doesn't have a problem. The modern touch of border guard attitude simply represents a major shift from the previous twenty-odd times I've entered Canada (and is still a major difference from the way Canadians treat me as a visitor, which is just about uniformly friendly and welcoming), and the OP should be prepared.

The oddest thing last time was the friendly welcome back into the States. I couldn't believe it. It was like US Customs were my fellow citizens and supported by my tax dollars or something. Completely took me aback. I have no doubt that they're a lot meaner to non-US nationals; they probably treat them the way they always treated me before.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 05:00 PM
 
515 posts, read 1,173,663 times
Reputation: 340
Yes you will need a passport.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 06:01 PM
 
4,285 posts, read 14,422,518 times
Reputation: 3867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lital_The_Best View Post
Okay,

I remember if you were an American citizen all you needed to get into Canada was your birth certificate and valid ID stating you're a citizen of America.

I was wondering if its still like that now or have the rules change and you need a passport to get in?

I know it sounds silly to ask but I do want to know and be safe.


Thank you.

For the sake of clarity, you will not require a passport to get into Canada; the USA is changing its requirements so you will need a passport to re-enter the United States at land crossings as of June1, 2009.

Any cross-border travel always goes easier with a passport. Take the time to obtain one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2009, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Cosmic Consciousness
3,871 posts, read 15,509,569 times
Reputation: 2637
Well, folks, let's sum up:
To enter Canada, and to enter the U.S., you need two things:
-- proof of identity, and
-- proof of citizenship.
Only one of them is not proof of the other -- which is why a passport is so handy as it proves both.

Here are the links you need for full, accurate and authoritative information.
To enter Canada:
Entering Canada • U.S. Consular Services in Canada (http://www.consular.canada.usembassy.gov/enter_canada.asp - broken link)
To enter the U.S.:
Documents You Will Need to Enter the United States - CBP.gov (http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/vacation/ready_set_go/air_travel/documents_needed.xml - broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2009, 09:54 AM
 
1,461 posts, read 2,942,074 times
Reputation: 598
You will need a passport or any other proof of citizenship anyways if you want to come back into the states.


going into Canada is easy.....coming back to the states is a nightmare
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top