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Old 04-15-2007, 10:57 AM
 
3 posts, read 28,092 times
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Hi,

I have a unique question. I would like to sample life in Canada. I am considering entering Canada as a tourist for 3 months, renting a place to live and sending my child to public school. Is this possible on a tourist visit? Do you need to prove Permanent Resident status to enroll your child in Canadian public schools? Specifically, I am looking at Ottawa.

Thanks for any help,

Michael
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Old 04-15-2007, 01:59 PM
 
4,285 posts, read 14,420,472 times
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Default Public School

Michael

If you were to enter the country on a tourist visa, your children do not have the legal right to attend school.

When you go to register your child for school, you will be asked to provide a birth certificate, Permanent Resident Card, visa, etc.

In order for them to attend grades 1 through 12, they must have some sort of documentation from Citizenship and Immigration Canada which allows them access to the school system. If you obtain the necessary documentation, there may also be a fee involved to cover their education costs.

Schools are generally quite rigorous in enforcing the policy because the school board only receives funding for properly documented students.


An exception would be if your child was attending kindergarten; documentation is not required.

Ontario actually has 2 de facto public school systems which receive government funding: the regular public system and the Seperate (Roman Catholic) System.

Assuming the "regular" system is the one you have in mind, try contacting the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board for complete information and requirements:

www.ocdsb.edu.on.ca (broken link)




Good luck
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Old 04-15-2007, 02:45 PM
 
3 posts, read 28,092 times
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Thanks Cornerguy,

I guess I will pursue Permanent Resident status. I am highly educated, currently finishing a PhD in the US. I have plenty of points under the Skilled Worker immigration category.

If I obtain Permanent Resident status do I still need to pay a fee to enroll my child in the public school system?

Thanks for the info,

Michael
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Old 04-15-2007, 09:10 PM
 
4,285 posts, read 14,420,472 times
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Michael,

I'm not sure of the time frame between applying for and receiving PR status from outside Canada, but it's likely 18 months at best.

Ever consider dropping the Ottawa Board of Education an email to the attention of their International Student coordinator just to ascertain the exact process and applicable fees?

A person with PR status is eligible to attend Canadian schools. It should be noted, though, that it's not enough for just you to apply and receive PR status; your child must also be included on the application. If PR status is granted, the child will receive their own Permanent Resident card.


A person with Permanent Resident status has all the rights and priveliges of a Canadian citizen save for they cannot possess a Canadian passport, nor can they vote. There are also some employment restrictions as far as high-level government positions, etc, but those are unlikely to affect your child.



As always, all the good stuff can be found on the Citizenship and Immigration Canada web site:

www.cic.gc.ca
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Old 04-18-2007, 10:40 AM
 
47 posts, read 263,720 times
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Also, please bear in mind the tax implications of becoming a resident of Canada. If you stay more than 183 days in Canada for any taxation year, you are considered a resident for taxation purposes.
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Old 12-28-2008, 05:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,661 times
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Question...If a mother is native american and has dual citizenship to both Canada and the US and the father is a US citizen is the child automatically a dual citizen? Now that the family is divorced, mom moved back home to Canada, Dad still resides in US,does the father have to sign a form in order for the child to go to school in Canada? Does the child have to have citizenship to go to school in Canada? Thanks, Jen
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Old 12-29-2008, 06:10 PM
 
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In Ontario, children are legally required to have either citizenship, PR status, or the appropriate student visa in order to attend school.

Questions about the child's citizenship should be addressed to Welcome Page | Page d'accueil.

There shouldn't be any requirement for the child's father to sign off on the deal, but a school board may require a single parent to show proof that they are a legal guardian. Contact the appropriate school board for individual requirements.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:15 AM
 
2 posts, read 14,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornerguy1 View Post
In Ontario, children are legally required to have either citizenship, PR status, or the appropriate student visa in order to attend school.
This is an interesting question overall. I seem to see some things that hint at what you say, and then others that say exactly the opposite.

Settlement.Org: How do I register my child in secondary school (high school)?
This seems to say that immigration status is not relevant.

It specifically refers to Education Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. E.2
which says
Quote:
Persons unlawfully in Canada
49.1 A person who is otherwise entitled to be admitted to a school and who is less than eighteen years of age shall not be refused admission because the person or the person’s parent or guardian is unlawfully in Canada. 1993, c. 11, s. 21.
I have also looked at some school board lists of what you need to show to register a child and they do not seem to need documents that show immigation status.

Thoughts?
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Old 01-22-2009, 02:41 PM
 
257 posts, read 1,303,503 times
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you could call 1-800-ocanada
they can tell you who to ask and give you phone #s
i call that # for lots of info on lots of topics
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Old 01-22-2009, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mellabella View Post
you could call 1-800-ocanada
they can tell you who to ask and give you phone #s
i call that # for lots of info on lots of topics
Not sure 1-800-O-Canada works from abroad.

Plus, education is a provincial rather than federal responsibility in Canada (though the 1-800-O-Canada people might be able to point you in the right direction anyway).

Best option is probably to contact the Ministry or Department of Education in the province you're thinking of settling in.
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