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Old 05-02-2007, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Chicago
53 posts, read 267,498 times
Reputation: 35
Default How cold is Canada?

I'm mainly interested in Vancouver for the milder climate but I'm wondering how cold some other Canadian cities are, especially Toronto, Calgary, and Edmonton.

The coldest winter I've experienced was actually this past winter in Chicago. It got down to the low single digits (don't laugh!) for a week or so in December. The rest of the month was in the teens and 20's. It was OK I guess but I'm not sure if I can handle anything colder.

I have lived in Buffalo for college a couple of years but I didn't spend too much time outside. Luckily, the campus consisted of connecting bridges and walkways between buildings.

30's are no problem, 20's is starting to get cold, and teens is when I actually prefer to stay inside.

Am I too soft for Canada?

Last edited by AngryTypingGuy; 05-02-2007 at 11:02 PM..
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Old 05-02-2007, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
550 posts, read 1,947,548 times
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Vancouver is the best city to live in!
This past winter was the coldest in years, going down to -6 a few nights but for the most part it stays above 0 year round. It does rain a lot in the winter but you get +10 days in the middle of winter that are blue sky and gorgeous!

I know you are asking about the other cities but I had to give my cheer for Vancouver and the Frasier Valley!

I lived in Edmonton for 5 1/2 years and was disappointed with the winters. There is very little green and no snow for a lot of the time. This makes for a sunny but boring winter. -20 at the coldest?

The city in summer is nice with the river valley and all the trails. +30 in the summer. I guess it was a nice prairie town but if I had to choose it would be Saskatoon or Calgary.

Calgary gets nice schnooks coming through in the winter. You have the mountains very close for recreation. Very pretty there.

Saskatoon is a fantastic college town. I grew up there so won't babble on about how great it is! Nice river town as well. Colder with more snow in the winter but very pretty because of it. Hot, dry summers.
The east side rules!!!!!!!

Winnipeg is very old as a city which makes for some neat exploring. It snows a LOT there. We called it Winterpeg when we lived there. Our husky was bought there. He comes from a long line of professional sled dogs so that shows you how snowy it is!!

I think that is all I know about living in Canada.

Welcome to a wonderful Country (if you move)

Skoe
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Old 05-03-2007, 11:25 AM
 
12 posts, read 190,376 times
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I'd say Toronto's winter weather is similar to Chicago's. Temperatures are generally in the 20's (Fahrenheit) with occasional cold spells. The major difference between the two is that winter lasts longer in Toronto.

As for snow: There's usually not much snow in the city itself, but some of the outlying areas can be snowier. Even though Buffalo is the nearest US city, the winters are very different. Buffalo gets a lot of lake effect snow because it's south of the lake. Toronto does not.
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Old 05-03-2007, 11:49 AM
Air
 
150 posts, read 367,178 times
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Montreal is COLD in the winter, and outside of the city is even colder. A Montrealer told me that the Canadian-US border is really a weather border, because the jet stream passes almost exactly over it. Above the jet stream is significantly colder. Sometimes the jet stream dips down and the Northern states of the US experience Canadian cold, but Canada is almost always above the jet stream.

In July, on the contrary, there are sometimes a few weeks when Montreal is the same temperature and experiences the same humidity as Florida. That's why you see so many pools in people's backyards when you fly in.
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Old 05-03-2007, 12:27 PM
 
Location: North Dakota Farm
322 posts, read 853,445 times
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That's a pretty general question. Depends on where in Canada. I know Alberta hit the minus 40 degrees below zero mark several times this past winter, but that's not always the case. It depends if it's a mild or harsh winter and one never knows!!
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Old 05-03-2007, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago
53 posts, read 267,498 times
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I've done some more research on Edmonton and Calgary and it sounds like I wouldn't be able to survive in those cities. Toronto sounds doable, however. I'll add the city to my list.

Thanks for your responses.
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Old 05-03-2007, 10:45 PM
 
266 posts, read 844,404 times
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don't forget, guys, to convert your Celsius temperatures to Fahrenheit when posting to US people! without converting, it sounds WAY colder to them than it actually is!!!

I know you are posting C , as I am from Canada, but don't scare the US folks too much!!
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Old 05-04-2007, 08:03 AM
 
Location: North Dakota Farm
322 posts, read 853,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty71 View Post
don't forget, guys, to convert your Celsius temperatures to Fahrenheit when posting to US people! without converting, it sounds WAY colder to them than it actually is!!!

I know you are posting C , as I am from Canada, but don't scare the US folks too much!!
LOL!! Actually, that was F!! Manitoba got that 3 week stretch of non-stop below 60 degree F temps and I know Alberta got a stretch of below 40 degree F temps...I think once it gets that cold...it's just friggen cold and the C to F makes no difference! At that point it kinda evens out.
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Old 05-04-2007, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Chicago
53 posts, read 267,498 times
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I was aware.
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Old 05-04-2007, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
3,030 posts, read 5,526,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty71 View Post
don't forget, guys, to convert your Celsius temperatures to Fahrenheit when posting to US people! without converting, it sounds WAY colder to them than it actually is!!!

I know you are posting C , as I am from Canada, but don't scare the US folks too much!!
It's okay. Converting makes metric harder to learn. They need to learn and get used to Celsius as the US is converting in a few years.
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