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Old 11-25-2009, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Europe
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Is it true that in Quebec French is required to be the only language of government and business but in the rest of Canada state administration is required to be proficient also in French?
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Old 11-25-2009, 07:46 PM
 
409 posts, read 1,349,074 times
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Originally Posted by paparaciii View Post
Is it true that in Quebec French is required to be the only language of government and business but in the rest of Canada state administration is required to be proficient also in French?
French is the only language of government within the province of Quebec. English is the only language of government within most other provinces. Quebec does have a language law that requires signs to be posted prominently in French but there is nothing stopping a store owner from using English to sell you a new TV.

As to the last part of your question, I assume you are asking if you need to be bilingual to get a job in the federal civil service? It certainly helps if it isn't a formal requirement.

There are some provinces where there is virtually zero French spoken (way less than Chinese and about a dozen other languages). What one person considers to be "bilingual" may vary from province to province (i.e. a federal employee in Alberta may not be as "bilingual" as someone from New Brunswick).
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Old 11-26-2009, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paparaciii View Post
Is it true that in Quebec French is required to be the only language of government and business but in the rest of Canada state administration is required to be proficient also in French?
Statements about a perceived double-standard that Quebec is “French only” while all of the rest of Canada has to be bilingual in English and French are something that you hear in English-speaking Canada all the time, often by drunk men in taverns, but also in nicer social settings.
Seriously, the reality is actually more like what Fred Derf described, and I will add the following to that.
The federal government of Canada has two official languages, English and French. Its policies, programs and services apply to anything federal all across the country, including in Quebec. Technically, a citizen should be able to receive federal services in either language no matter where they live. The reality is that services are generally provided in both English and French in Quebec, New Brunswick and the national capital region (Ottawa and Gatineau) virtually 100% of the time. Outside of these areas, in spite of what the law says, service in French is often difficult to come by, and lobby groups for French speakers in the English provinces constantly complain about it.
Regarding employment in the federal public service of Canada, positions are either designated as bilingual, English only or French only. Almost 60% of Canadian federal jobs are English only, 35% are designated bilingual and barely 5% are French only. Obviously almost every single one of the rare French only jobs are in Quebec, and most federal jobs in Quebec require the person to be bilingual. Except for Ottawa and New Brunswick, most other federal jobs in Canada are English only.
Canada’s provinces also deliver many services. As Fred Derf said, Quebec is officially French only, New Brunswick is bilingual and the others are all officially English only. However, the level of minority language services can vary even among the unilingual (monolingual) provinces. Quebec and Ontario do not give official status to their language minorities, but offer way more services to them than most other provinces do. Manitoba and Nova Scotia for example are also English only and offer some services to their minorities, but less than Quebec and Ontario do.
And not all provinces offer the same things to their minorities. Manitoba goes further than Quebec even on signage, and so you see signs in English and French in many places there. The same with Ontario, where there is quite a bit of bilingual signage. Much more than in Quebec, where most signs are in French only. But on the other hand, Quebec has much broader (publicly-funded) educational and social service networks in English than Ontario does. For example, there are 800,000 anglos in Quebec and they have three English-language universities, whereas the 500,000 francophones in Ontario have no French university and have to settle for bilingual sections in a few universities where the majority is English.
New Brunswick is officially bilingual. It is majority English but almost 1/3 of the population is French-speaking and a fairly large area of the province operates in French (schools, hospitals, municipalities, businesses, etc.). There is also a French-language university in Moncton.
Finally, although education in Canada is a provincial responsibility, the federal constitution requires the provinces to provide separate elementary and secondary schooling in the minority language (English in Quebec, French outside) where numbers warrant and subject to certain conditions. So you actually have the odd French school here and there in English-speaking Canada and an archipelago of English schools in Quebec.
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Old 11-30-2009, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD
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It's a tricky issue, Federal law as already mentioned by acajack states that services have to be provided in both languages.. whether they are or how well they are provided is another question
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Old 11-30-2009, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
1,049 posts, read 5,843,353 times
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Originally Posted by paparaciii View Post
Is it true that in Quebec French is required to be the only language of government and business but in the rest of Canada state administration is required to be proficient also in French?
Official bilingualism in Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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