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Old 12-13-2009, 06:19 AM
 
985 posts, read 3,189,350 times
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How come Edmonton's warmer than Winnipeg, in spite of its being almost 4 higher in latitude and 430 m higher in elevation?
It doesn't get Chinooks, neither is it that close to the sea, which lies behind the Rockies.
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Old 12-14-2009, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
7,827 posts, read 10,349,004 times
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Warmer when?

Winnipeg's summers are much milder than Edmonton's. If you think that the Pacific has no impact on the weather, then you need to validate what causes chinooks. Just because Edmonton doesn't reap the same level of benefits that Calgary does, doesn't mean that it stays locked in a frozen hell like Manitoba. (although it's close)
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Old 12-14-2009, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD
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because it's friggin cursed that's why...
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Old 12-15-2009, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Something about Winnipeg's proximity Hudsons Bay might be part of it.
Have you seen how cold Churchill, Manitoba is?
Most of mainlaind Northwest Territories sees much warmer summers.

Air tends to flows westward, and Edmonton might experience many days with mild "compressional heating." (weak effects of "chinook")
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Old 12-15-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD
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All I know is I sure wouldn't like to be in Edmonton these past few days...

YIKES!
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Mississqauga, Canada
8 posts, read 35,594 times
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I agree with Cold Canadian, having seen so many years of weather forecasts, one prominent feature is how the isobars seem to take the dip, parallel waves like a ripple effect in a pond, from Hudson Bay. Even subsequent, more southern ones do the same dip. I have always thought of Hudson Bay as the villain that makes cities like Toronto and Detroit so much colder than their European counterparts of similar latitude, such as Rome.
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Old 12-20-2009, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyO1 View Post
I agree with Cold Canadian, having seen so many years of weather forecasts, one prominent feature is how the isobars seem to take the dip, parallel waves like a ripple effect in a pond, from Hudson Bay. Even subsequent, more southern ones do the same dip. I have always thought of Hudson Bay as the villain that makes cities like Toronto and Detroit so much colder than their European counterparts of similar latitude, such as Rome.
Ice on Hudson Bay was to blame for Toronto's cool June this year, and it's what, 1000 miles north of us?

Take a look at the averages for Timmins, Ontario.
I think it's still south the 49th parallel, western Canada's southern border.
Yet it's probably cooler/colder on average than places like Winnipeg, Regina or Calgary.
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Old 12-23-2009, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Mississqauga, Canada
8 posts, read 35,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Ice on Hudson Bay was to blame for Toronto's cool June this year, and it's what, 1000 miles north of us?

Take a look at the averages for Timmins, Ontario.
I think it's still south the 49th parallel, western Canada's southern border.
Yet it's probably cooler/colder on average than places like Winnipeg, Regina or Calgary.

I think your example of Timmins illustrates my point. Timmins is much closer to Hudson's Bay than prairie cities, including Winnipeg (James Bay, a subset, to be more specific).

Also, its the spring in which Hudson's Bay impact is most pronounced. I forgot to state that. Toronto and Detroit sure get hot enough, and then some, in the summer, at least most years.

And, in checking the figures, Winnipeg is about two celsius degrees warmer in July than is Edmonton, but Winnipeg's spring is later off the mark, its about two degrees colder in April than Edmonotn and a phenomenal 6 degrees colder in January. Brrrrr. Winterpeg!

Check out the climate graphs on Wikipedia.
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