U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Cancer
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-02-2009, 08:14 PM
 
Location: South of Houston
419 posts, read 1,226,752 times
Reputation: 436

Advertisements

Anyone had this surgery done for skin cancer..? If so, please tell us your experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-02-2009, 10:22 PM
 
2,085 posts, read 2,967,537 times
Reputation: 3924
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoydS View Post
Anyone had this surgery done for skin cancer..? If so, please tell us your experience.
I had MOHS surgery to remove a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) on my face last year.

The surgery was performed at my dermatologist's office. They had me lie on the table (dressed in my regular clothes) and they used small needles to inject painkiller into my upper cheek where the BCC was located. Then the doctor used his instrument to remove tissue. I don't know what the tool looked like, but I kind of got the idea that it was like those wood-burning tools. Certainly I could smell burnt flesh -- I guess the instrument cauterizes the wound as it removes tissue. And certainly it was an electrical instrument of some sort. The doctor put a small metal plate on my torso...the plate was attached via a chain to the table, and I was lying on the table. So I guessed the plate was a grounding sort of device.

So for the surgery, they remove as modest an amount of tissue as they can, then they send you to the waiting room to wait while they view the sample under the microscope. In my case, they detected cancer cells still in the first sample, so I went back for round 2...then was sent back to the waiting room.

More cancer cells...round 3. Back to the waiting room.

Round 3 was clear. No cancer cells. So I went back to the room where the surgery was performed, got back on the table. They had to give me more painkiller at this point because it was starting to wear off. They took a tiny bit more tissue to get good clean margins. Then they stitched up the wound, using stitches under the skin and on top of the skin.

They bandaged me up and sent me home with instructions on wound-care. The stitches were removed a week later. The wound stayed sensitive for a few weeks after the surgery, but then I could touch it. The doctor WANTED me to touch it...to massage it...to make sure the tissue didn't heal with lumps. You know?

I don't remember EXACTLY how long the process lasted. Maybe 3 hours altogether? Something like that. It all depends on how extensive your cancer spot is. In my case, the spot that was visible on the surface of the skin was TINY, but the doctor said it had these lateral fingers underneath the surface, and that's why my wound was larger. (My scar is about an inch long, and my cancer spot had been smaller than the head of a pin.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-02-2009, 11:41 PM
 
Location: North Adams, MA
746 posts, read 2,304,275 times
Reputation: 740
I had it done for a basal cell carcinoma located in a very sensitive spot at the corner of my eye. It was relatively painless, and simple. It took two "shavings" to remove all the active cells. Never recurred.

I remember that the waiting room was full of people that looked like my relatives, or possibly a reunion of the Hibernian Society. It seems we Irish-English get a lot of these facial blobs, most likely from the sun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2009, 08:25 AM
 
2,085 posts, read 2,967,537 times
Reputation: 3924
Quote:
Originally Posted by litlux View Post
I remember that the waiting room was full of people that looked like my relatives, or possibly a reunion of the Hibernian Society. It seems we Irish-English get a lot of these facial blobs, most likely from the sun.
Yes, this is what it was like for me as well! Lots of fair-skinned white folks with various scars and bandages, mostly along the LEFT sides of their bodies (faces, ears, neck, arms).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2009, 08:39 PM
 
Location: South of Houston
419 posts, read 1,226,752 times
Reputation: 436
I have surgery scheduled for Friday and this will be my first experience. The surgery is to remove a squamous cell carcinoma on my upper chest. From what I have been told by the doctor who will perform this surgery, it was caught very early and everything should go well. He has perscribed Azithromycin an antibiotic that is to be taken the day before the surgery. Diazepam was also perscribed to be taken just before the surgery to take the "edge off".

Thanks for the replies. It makes me more at ease that the procedure is not painful. I just want to get it over with and move on. Thanks again...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2010, 01:32 PM
 
2,866 posts, read 4,209,783 times
Reputation: 1632
I had Mohs surgery to remove a BCC from my nose. They got everything they needed on the first try, stitched me up and sent me on my way. Probably no more than 1.5 hours; I was on an airplane later that day (with a big bandage). I was given a prescription for an ointment to apply for several days. No scar, only a slight dent in the skin on one side of my nose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2010, 09:33 PM
 
Location: CO @ 8300'
1,605 posts, read 2,544,479 times
Reputation: 1876
Quote:
Originally Posted by litlux View Post
I had it done for a basal cell carcinoma located in a very sensitive spot at the corner of my eye. It was relatively painless, and simple. It took two "shavings" to remove all the active cells. Never recurred.
.
Interesting... my bcc was in the same place (by your description). I think my doctor had to go 3-4 layers. My surgery was performed in 1985 by one of the first doctors who was doing MOHS in CO at that time. In fact, my insurance wouldn't cover it because they deemed it "experimental". (I fought that and won.) I needed to have a plastic surgeon close it up. There's no trace of a scar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2012, 10:53 PM
 
1 posts, read 11,299 times
Reputation: 11
Default nervous

I have my cells removed tomorrow very close to my eye. I am nervous I really dont want a big scar on my face. I know that should be the least of my worries but I am just nervous. How long is recovery?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2012, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
10,436 posts, read 10,173,161 times
Reputation: 10363
Quote:
Originally Posted by marsha67 View Post
I have my cells removed tomorrow very close to my eye. I am nervous I really dont want a big scar on my face. I know that should be the least of my worries but I am just nervous. How long is recovery?
Please discuss your concern with your surgeon.

The whole idea behind this procedure is to remove the least amount of tissue that will ensure that all the abnormal area is gone.

A big part of minimizing the scar is meticulous care afterwards. Follow instructions! Ask about some of the new products that are available to minimize scarring, too.

Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2012, 03:29 PM
Status: "I wear the chain I forged in life..." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Forty Fort
4,145 posts, read 3,235,885 times
Reputation: 8930
Quote:
Originally Posted by marsha67 View Post
I have my cells removed tomorrow very close to my eye. I am nervous I really dont want a big scar on my face. I know that should be the least of my worries but I am just nervous. How long is recovery?
By now your surgery is probably over. I hope all went well and you found that you can live with whatever scar remains. The key word is "Live".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Cancer

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top