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Old 10-06-2015, 03:17 PM
 
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IMO, a lot of older people go "off" due to the very drugs that are supposed to help prolong their lives. Seems everyone I know over the age of 60 is on some sort of drug concoction -- pills for blood pressure, blood sugar, depression, arthritis, neuropathy, pain, you name it, there's a pill for it! Then, combine that with poor diet, lack of exercise, junk food, etc. Many elderly people have limited options for food. Its too difficult to go grocery shopping, then haul it in, stand there chopping, slicing, dicing, cooking, etc. My parents resorted to fast food the last few years of their lives, it was all they could manage.

Perhaps "back in the day" not as many people went "off" because they didn't ingest chemicals masquerading as food, then handled the "side effects" with more fistfuls of chemicals called "medicine"
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Old 10-06-2015, 05:45 PM
 
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they need to find a cure or help for caregivers at least bad or great President Reagan did go public with it
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
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They are the 'crazy old lady' or 'cranky old man' down the block or wandering around town.

Now we have a name for it.

And elder care has improved. Assisted living facilities have only existed the last decade or two, and nursing homes have also improved.

Day care, CNAs and visiting nurses have helped as well. Still, it's very difficult for the family and caregivers.
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
You're right - it wasn't nearly as common as it is now because people simply didn't live as long. So frankly, it wasn't as huge an issue as it is now.

I swear, sometimes I don't think we're prolonging life - I think we're prolonging death.
From birth to age 22 (1938 - 1960) I lived in a town of 5,000 in a rural area. First, I had a very large paper route, which took me into the homes of a lot of people, and I saw what was going on and would go home and ask my mother about it. Then from age 14 to 18 I worked in one of the village pharmacies, and I was the one who would run over to homebound folks with their medicines. Again, another look into peoples home life. And, of course, their were our own relatives, out in small hamlets or up in the hills.

My impression of those years is that most people died of heart attacks or complications with pneumonia in their seventies. Then there were those indomitable folks who were hale and hearty until two weeks before they died in their late eighties or early nineties. The smallest group were the very frail and confused elderly, a few of whom where quite "batty" and were taken care of by relatives. Some old people ended up the County Home, but that seemed to be mainly the result of poverty and no relatives.

The confused elderly were just regarded as that, and it was unfortunate but no big deal.

Those deemed "batty" may have had Alzheimers, but were certainly demented in their conduct. What I recall about them is that while they were a burden to their caretakers, in my recollection they had fewer restraints...perhaps because the town was small and safe, or like some of my relatives they lived in the countryside. Far more women were at home, and working people came home for lunch, the postman came twice a day, the milkman came in the mornings, the garbage men came twice a week, and people walked the streets...these were all local people who knew what was what all over town. As a result, as on the first street I lived on, if the "batty" woman up the street wandered out of the house, she was soon seen and immediately some neighbor or the postman approached her and walked her home, or gave a yell to her family.

My female cousin in the hill country used to have to watch her father's mother, who was allowed outside to sit on the porch, walk on the lawn or in the garden...and she gave a yell if grandma was going toward the road (a dirt road that saw little traffic), or if she started to walk into the fields. And my cousin got relieved by her younger brother so she didn't have to do this all the time.

And when these folks go sick, they died fast...they weren't tied to a living death with rubber tubes.
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,796 posts, read 11,057,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
You're right - it wasn't nearly as common as it is now because people simply didn't live as long. So frankly, it wasn't as huge an issue as it is now.

I swear, sometimes I don't think we're prolonging life - I think we're prolonging death.
It was as common, and as previous posters said, multi-generations were cared for in the same house.
People often did live long lives. Look at the ages of deaths of the the early Presidents of the US- just for a fun exercise. My ancestors lived into their 70s, 80s, 90s. I have them researched back to the 1600s.

The only thing that is new is the increased presence of a greater percentage reaching up to the 100 year and up mark mostly due to HBP medication.
http://money.usnews.com/money/retire...have-in-common

Social welfare has moved from a family and local issue to a state and federal gov't issue. The idea was to improve the level of care since very old folks, the mad, the mentally retarded, were sometimes locked up in their rooms, neglected, & mistreated, or left to fend in the streets etc. One could argue this issue from both sides- family responsibility sure- but who oversees the level of care? And what if there's no family?
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: SC
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My maternal Grandmother did live-in care for 2 families with elder/dementia, back in the 60's and 70's. It gave her a job and paid for someone to stay in the home full time to help with the person.
She herself lived to 95, but by then, she was in a nursing home.
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Old 10-07-2015, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,359 posts, read 35,864,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
It was as common, and as previous posters said, multi-generations were cared for in the same house.
People often did live long lives. Look at the ages of deaths of the the early Presidents of the US- just for a fun exercise. My ancestors lived into their 70s, 80s, 90s. I have them researched back to the 1600s.

The only thing that is new is the increased presence of a greater percentage reaching up to the 100 year and up mark mostly due to HBP medication.
What People Who Live to 100 Have in Common - US News

Social welfare has moved from a family and local issue to a state and federal gov't issue. The idea was to improve the level of care since very old folks, the mad, the mentally retarded, were sometimes locked up in their rooms, neglected, & mistreated, or left to fend in the streets etc. One could argue this issue from both sides- family responsibility sure- but who oversees the level of care? And what if there's no family?
Alzheimer's was NOT as common in the 20th century as it is now, because people are living longer now and Alzheimer's percentages increase with age.

One in 9 people age 65 have Alzheimers, while 1 in 3 people age 85 have Alzheimer's.

Alzheimer's & Dementia Risk Factors | Alzheimer's Association

In 1930, the average life expectancy in the US was 59.7 years of age. By 1950 it was 68.2. By 1975, it was 72.6. 1985 - 75.7. 2005 - 77.8. 2014 - 78.7.

However, for women (more women than men have Alzheimers), in 1930 the life expectancy was 58.1 and now it's in the early 80s.

Life Expectancy at Birth by Race and Sex, 1930–2010

Since Alzheimer's risk and prevalence increases with age, and since Baby Boomers (the largest generation of people in middle age to elderly age) are entering retirement and elderly years, it makes sense that the more older people we have in our population, the more Alzheimer's will be around.

Quote:
The number of Americans with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias will grow each year as the size and proportion of the U.S. population age 65 and older continue to increase. By 2025, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease is estimated to reach 7.1 million — a 40 percent increase from the 5.1 million age 65 and older affected in 2015. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease may nearly triple, from 5.1 million to a projected 13.8 million, barring the development of medical breakthroughs to prevent or cure the disease.
http://www.alz.org/facts/
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Old 10-07-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
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What I worry about is that none of the future generations are going to live as long as we are doing - so many people are not taking care of themselves. You see such a huge percentage of people walking around with 100 extra pounds (or more) and just know they are not going to be living until 70, 80, or 90 as their parents do.

We will be back to children being on their own at age 30 and 40, as it was in medieval times.
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Old 10-07-2015, 12:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
My mother used to tell me about how there was a "dotty grandma" living in most families. The daughter (usually) took her into her house and there she stayed, helping out with the children if she was able, maybe doing a bit of sewing, feeding the chickens or whatnot, and after she could do none of that, just sitting there. She was still a part of the family, just in a different capacity.

Usually the house belonged to the "dotty grandma:"Grandma got a place to live and in-home care in exchange for letting the family live there, and passing the family homestead on when she died. Nowasdays its much different.People seldom stay in the same home for a generation or more. We now buy insurance to get into crapholes -- ie assisted cared facilities -- while our offspring move about the country.
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Old 10-07-2015, 02:37 PM
 
Location: between three Great Lakes.
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Mercifully, people in the old days didn't live so goddam long.
That's a rare downside of modern medicine. There is no reason for us to hang on until we're living corpses. Length of life now trumps quality of life, more's the pity.
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