U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Caregiving
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-13-2015, 08:36 PM
 
77 posts, read 70,079 times
Reputation: 174

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
People are forgetting the higher infant, childhood and young adult mortality in previous decades and centuries. If you made it to 30, you would likely live many more years.
The numbers are skewed way down by the large number of infant and childhood deaths.

It's the same sort of thing that happens when we calculate our average income based on me and you and Bill Gates... we're each making about 4,000,000,000 a year- which should mean I can pay off my mortgage- except that number is skewed up by that showboat Bill Gates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-14-2015, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,326 posts, read 35,852,560 times
Reputation: 62697
People are living an average of five years longer AFTER RETIREMENT than they did in the 1940s. Women live an average of five years longer than men AFTER RETIREMENT.

Considering that the rate of Alzheimer's increases significantly over the age of 65 by year, it makes sense that 1) the incidence of Alzheimer's is increasing as life spans increase, and 2) more women than men have Alzheimer's.

Social Security History
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 10:45 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,140 posts, read 20,313,684 times
Reputation: 26377
I'm pretty sure the statins play a role in more people developing Alzheimer's.

I took statins for seven or eight months. I stopped because I noticed I was unable to do simple math calculations and my reading comprehension declined. My doctor was fairly emphatic that all diabetics need to be taking a statin. I told her my dad has Alzheimer's and with the way that the statins messed with my brain, I'd rather die younger from cardiovascular problems than live to a ripe old age and end up like my dad. So she prescribed something for cholesterol that was not a statin, but it made me itch really badly, and then she said to take red yeast rice, but that gave me the same issues as statins.


My sister says Alzheimer's is the real zombie epidemic, but instead of eating other people's brains, their bodies are consuming their own brains. Pretty gruesome way to look at it...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 11:10 AM
 
12,573 posts, read 13,984,589 times
Reputation: 34454
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I'll say something positive about nursing homes and memory care centers. They beat the heck out of state run mental institutions, which is where a lot of people "back in the day" ended up when their families could no longer care for them.
Or the County Homes I was familiar with as a young man... under-funded, dependent upon donations of sheets, blankets, robes to keep going at anything approaching a decent level...really doleful places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 11:17 AM
 
7,909 posts, read 7,240,556 times
Reputation: 6258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
I'm pretty sure the statins play a role in more people developing Alzheimer's.

I took statins for seven or eight months. I stopped because I noticed I was unable to do simple math calculations and my reading comprehension declined. My doctor was fairly emphatic that all diabetics need to be taking a statin. I told her my dad has Alzheimer's and with the way that the statins messed with my brain, I'd rather die younger from cardiovascular problems than live to a ripe old age and end up like my dad. So she prescribed something for cholesterol that was not a statin, but it made me itch really badly, and then she said to take red yeast rice, but that gave me the same issues as statins.


My sister says Alzheimer's is the real zombie epidemic, but instead of eating other people's brains, their bodies are consuming their own brains. Pretty gruesome way to look at it...
Statins are linked to diabetes which is also a major risk factor for Alzheimer's. Your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes goes up 50 percent when you go on statins. She needs to rethink what she's saying.

My mom had to go on Metformin as well. Her doctor was told to reduce her dosage of statins after the ER doctors examined her after a series of falls. They found her doctor was overprescribing medicines for cholesterol and high blood pressure, even though she had never had a heart attack.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 12:14 PM
 
6,821 posts, read 7,212,137 times
Reputation: 9729
Quote:
more women than men have Alzheimer's.
Yes, it would make sense that more women are living with it numbers wise -- but a higher percentage of women have it. That's what some of us find disturbing. (along with everything else about it)

All the stories and actual experiences we and loved ones have had with bad drug interactions, side effects and outcomes -- and yet doctors marvel and are taken aback when you tell them you don't want to take a drug. My doctor was practically aghast when I told her I was NOT going to take Lipitor. She. was. shocked. I asked my (male) co worker about the drug. He says he's been on it for years....I asked him did he even asked about taking something else. Said he took it no questions asked. Clearly some people will take drugs without the concerns others have.

Clearly drugs can save lives. I just don't take them...just because a doctor says so.

Last edited by selhars; 10-14-2015 at 12:28 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,737 posts, read 23,704,984 times
Reputation: 30454
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
People are living an average of five years longer AFTER RETIREMENT than they did in the 1940s. Women live an average of five years longer than men AFTER RETIREMENT.

Considering that the rate of Alzheimer's increases significantly over the age of 65 by year, it makes sense that 1) the incidence of Alzheimer's is increasing as life spans increase, and 2) more women than men have Alzheimer's.

Social Security History
Five years isn't much considering all the surgical procedures and medications now available.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 05:20 PM
 
11,210 posts, read 8,350,431 times
Reputation: 20256
FTD awareness week just passed. I have a dear friend with that.

I agree about something in our diet that is causing some of the issues. I hate to harp about artificial colors and flavors but my son was diagnosed with ADD until I took him off of all of those chemicals. Not all countries even allow half the garbage we put in our US bodies.

I think there were a lot of bad institutions. They did bad things to mental patients in the name of science.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 09:00 PM
 
7,909 posts, read 7,240,556 times
Reputation: 6258
Or sugar.

Coffee seems to be good for dementia and heart disease. I recall that it dilates the blood vessels and leeches calcium out of your arteries thus reducing odds for plaque buildup. The downside is that it also leeches calcium out of your joints (arthritis).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2015, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,578 posts, read 14,187,164 times
Reputation: 30190
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Your grandparents were not the rule, but were rather the exception.

My grandparents both lived into their 80s as well (one with dementia, by the way). But their parents died in their sixties and seventies. My husband's grandparents died in their sixties and early seventies. His father died at 79 and his mother is still living, with Alzheimer's, at age 84. But she would have probably passed away long before now, due to high blood pressure as well as several strokes, if she had lived "back in the day."

Alzheimer's usually hits the very elderly, though of course it can occur sooner. But the vast majority of people with Alzheimer's are age 75 and older. When the average life span was only the early seventies (or younger) MANY fewer people developed advanced dementia which was incapacitating.

I already gave the links to that information. I also already explained how we are seeing a huge increase in the sheer number of people who are moving into their elderly years. The first Baby Boomers turned 75 this year, so as this massive generation ages, we will see many more Alzheimer's patients.

https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/alzheimers/qanda.shtm

So - there were fewer Alzheimer's patients, who also had larger families (more kids to take care of them) in our grandparents' day, generally speaking. They also didn't live as long, with or without Alzheimer's. Larger families shared the burden of their care much of the time, but there have been nursing homes for the elderly for many decades now - and they've always been full - of elderly people whose families couldn't take care of them.

We're in for a hot mess in the upcoming decades because we have the massive BB generation, living longer, and they (we) had fewer kids. Well, some of us did - I have five kids but that's unusual.

Maybe we should all invest in nursing homes and memory care centers.
Hi KA: Mostly I agree with everything you posted but I have to take issue with your statement that the first baby boomers turn 75 this year. I was born in 1946, and I have always known that I was in the vanguard of the boomers, age wise. I am turning 69 in two days. Boomers are the children born after 1945, or after WWII ended. My DH, born in 1942, is not a Boomer, nor has he ever considered himself to be one. However as I understand it, the end date of the Boomer generation is in question. I first understood it to be 1960, but have read more lately that it ended sooner. By the time I was having kids in the 1970s, the birth rate had slowed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Caregiving
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:21 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top