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Old 12-05-2015, 07:50 AM
 
20,356 posts, read 16,507,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
Perhaps that is the case.


While my husband has not been a long care facility, there were several times during his three week rehab in a nursing home that a CNA noticed something (such as his loss of appetite) that the nurses either did not notice or care to report to me.
The time the CNAs spend with your loved one is vastly more than the nurses do. There is no one in the home who knows your loved one better. The nurse spends 10 minutes taking vitals and giving them pills, it is not a relationship that invites intimacy. The CNA however is with your loved one for extended periods for dressing, showers, etc. It does invite a relationship more so then with the nurses, and residents often open up during these times to the CNAs. It would not surprise me at all if OPs loved one had made comments about being sad or lonely to this CNA.
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Old 12-05-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,303 posts, read 7,878,087 times
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I've been asked over the decades that I was in health care to give my professional opinion to family members that want to know if they're loved one will make it, and I always give them my standard answer. "That's an excellent question to discuss with your M.D. " I would never say anything like that to a family member. Sorry but it's unprofessional, and creates unnecessary anxiety for already stressed out loved ones. People don't want to hear that their loved ones are sliding down the other side of the mountain. They want that miracle that is so elusive. I can't tell you how many times I heard that my dear one was walking and active last month. Well yeah, but do we go forward in life or do we go backwards? Fragile patients conditions can change day to day, hour to hour, and even minute to minute if they're end stage. It's a difficult process and some people need to be eased into the inevitable. Not slammed over the head with a verbal club.
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Old 12-05-2015, 10:48 AM
 
803 posts, read 1,424,934 times
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Just get over it. Life's too short to be angry all the time.
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Old 12-09-2015, 03:04 AM
 
154 posts, read 88,226 times
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This individual is housekeeping and that's it. She had no access to my dad's medical records at all.


If there is a concern with my dad's health, I hear it from his caretaking staff, including nursing which is 24/7.


My dad is one of those that is pretty much the same day in and day out. When he arrived at the facility, he was overcoming many obstacles and couldn't even get out of his bed, to the bathroom, nor be bathed without a Hoyer lift.


After a subdural hematoma, he was barely able to speak.


That was nearly a year ago. Staff was frustrated with his progress and wanted to move him to the higher care unit of the facility at the beginning, but day be day they saw him improving when he finally made his mind up to.


You should see him now!! His memory is back, he's able to carry on conversations with everyone, and he even takes himself to the bathroom at times!!


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Old 12-09-2015, 05:36 AM
 
3,758 posts, read 10,606,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ourdaywillcome View Post


You should see him now!! His memory is back, he's able to carry on conversations with everyone, and he even takes himself to the bathroom at times!!



That's really fantastic that he's made such progress!

I certainly hope that you both have a good holiday season.

As to the thoughtless comments of the worker - please don't go crazy trying to guess their motivation. People are weird and do weird things, and that includes workers of SNF/NH/ALFs.
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Old 12-09-2015, 07:30 AM
 
20,356 posts, read 16,507,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ourdaywillcome View Post
This individual is housekeeping and that's it. She had no access to my dad's medical records at all.


If there is a concern with my dad's health, I hear it from his caretaking staff, including nursing which is 24/7.


My dad is one of those that is pretty much the same day in and day out. When he arrived at the facility, he was overcoming many obstacles and couldn't even get out of his bed, to the bathroom, nor be bathed without a Hoyer lift.


After a subdural hematoma, he was barely able to speak.


That was nearly a year ago. Staff was frustrated with his progress and wanted to move him to the higher care unit of the facility at the beginning, but day be day they saw him improving when he finally made his mind up to.


You should see him now!! His memory is back, he's able to carry on conversations with everyone, and he even takes himself to the bathroom at times!!


That's great, and I am glad he's doing better. That said, that is unusual for a housekeeper to change the linens. I have worked in at least 2 dozen rehabs and SNFs in 18 years and never have been in one where the housekeepers change the bed linens, it is almost universally the CNA's job. The housekeeper normally cleans everything else in the room but not that.
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Old 12-09-2015, 07:55 AM
 
237 posts, read 160,200 times
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Some people just say stupid things. I don't think they intend to be hurtful, but sometimes that's how it comes out.

I'm fond of the quote: "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and to remove all doubt." I think it's attributed to Abraham Lincoln.
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Old 12-09-2015, 09:05 AM
 
7,945 posts, read 7,256,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ourdaywillcome View Post
This individual is housekeeping and that's it. She had no access to my dad's medical records at all.


If there is a concern with my dad's health, I hear it from his caretaking staff, including nursing which is 24/7.


My dad is one of those that is pretty much the same day in and day out. When he arrived at the facility, he was overcoming many obstacles and couldn't even get out of his bed, to the bathroom, nor be bathed without a Hoyer lift.


After a subdural hematoma, he was barely able to speak.


That was nearly a year ago. Staff was frustrated with his progress and wanted to move him to the higher care unit of the facility at the beginning, but day be day they saw him improving when he finally made his mind up to.


You should see him now!! His memory is back, he's able to carry on conversations with everyone, and he even takes himself to the bathroom at times!!


I don't think the nurse's aides have access to medical records. They have to fill out electronic records on what they did with the patient everytime they do something. The nurses don't spend a whole of time with the patients except disburse pills, set up the IVs, and take the vital signs. The doctors spend even less time, and often have their own practices during the day.

The nurse's aides are probably aware of the medical reason the patient is in rehab, They probably don't know about the conditions for which they're treated for with diet and medicine.

Of course, none of which you said is really relevant to her observations. He may have largely overcome the things that put him into rehab, but he may have chronic conditions that may be manifesting now. I made a point of talking to the nurse's aides and the nurse every day. The other person to talk to is obviously the therapist. It seems like a big leap to being near dying, but then, you probably don't talk to her much. This may just be one of those cases where he had a bad day or she caught him at a bad time of the day before he became active.
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Old 12-12-2015, 08:28 PM
 
154 posts, read 88,226 times
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This person was not a CNA at all, but merely the person that changes my dad's bedding.


At the facility my dad stays at, he has nurses that dispense his meds, and CNA's that help him to the bathroom, etc.


I asked not only the Social Worker, but the Administrative Nurse if anything had changed with my dad and was told by both that he likes to stay in his room all cuddled up in his blanket for the most part of his day. This has been his way since he got there. For the most part, he's always in a great mood (yet has his days)..communicates with staff and others, etc. He's passed all of his depression, memory and communication tests with flying colors.


My dad loves the communication from staff that visit him every hour or so as he just likes to sit and think in his recliner. He doesn't even like the tv on, but has told me that he likes his quiet time to think about old times..as at 87 years old, there are many. He said he does this to keep his mind fresh.


I think this is great and staff does also.


This staff member used to give him his meds at the Assisted Living facility he lived at about a year ago. She wasn't a CNA then and she isn't a CNA now, but a very nice lady.


However, she didn't see my dad at the worst of times after he was coming off from subdural hematoma brain surgery; how the staff had to get him out of bed on a Hoyer Lift, and how he could barely put two words together.


The only thing she's seen is how he is now.


Since she's only been there since September, seeing my dad squished up in his chair is pretty usual.


I'm thankful for her input..just set me on a spree to ask the rest of staff if what she said was indeed, true.
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Old 12-12-2015, 08:55 PM
 
154 posts, read 88,226 times
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I agree with you and many confuse the difference between MAs and CNAs. You'd think that CNA's would be the higher of the two educations required but it's actually the opposite. MAs require about two years of education, while CNAs only require 6 months to a year.


Folks also confuse the difference between RNs and LPN, as RNs are actually more educated than LPNs.


My dad has many that take care of his medical needs and the majority of the ones the merely take him to the bathroom are MAs. In addition, the person that dispenses his meds is not only an RN, but also the Nurse Administrator.


In addition, my dad is one of those that can pretty much take care of himself..just needs a little help including help to the bathroom, getting dressed, etc.and the CNAs on staff take care of these things, while the MAs step in if needed.


The MAs on staff take care of the residents with more required care, but the facility is staffed well enough that if an MA is needed..they're there to provide needed care, along with the Nurse Administrator and an on call MD.


I don't think I have any worries, but thank this woman for tuning me in as she has become a really good friend to me over the course of her two jobs.


A bit of overreaction on my part, yet thankful she said what she thought was needed.
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