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Old 03-23-2016, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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This is a dumb question but typically how long after a natural death in a nursing home do they require the family to remove the personal possessions of the deceased? In this case, most of the furniture in the room, except for a hospital bed, was owned by the deceased. So, two dressers & two large chairs, photographs, pictures on the wall, plus, of course, clothing and personal items will need to removed.

It is not the case of just a couple of Banker's boxes of clothing & knick-knacks that the staff can easily pack up.


The reason that I am asking is that one of the large pictures was actually a gift from me to the person who passed away. I gave it to her decades ago & she has always had it up in her home & then in senior housing and now at the nursing home. She always said that I could have it after she passed away as a remembrance of her. However, I really doubt if she ever mentioned it to the relatives who supervised her care. I asked about it a decade ago and she said that she would mark my name on the back. But, I am almost 100% sure that she did not do that nor has it listed anyplace.

I really am hesitant to mention it so close after her death, but I am concerned that it will either be given to another relative or possible just given to Goodwill, especially if the nursing home is making them empty her room very quickly.

Last edited by germaine2626; 03-23-2016 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 03-23-2016, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Canada
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I'm in Canada. The literature I was given when my mother entered the nursing home said three days. That's probably because nursing homes here usually have waiting lists.
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Old 03-23-2016, 12:16 PM
 
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I wouid imagine items are taken out right away.
All you can do is ask very quietly & respectfully...saying just what you said here. You gave her a picture in xxyear & she said it would be yours upon her death. You hoped to have it as a memory item.
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Old 03-23-2016, 01:49 PM
 
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Germaine - I'm sorry if this means your lovely aunt has passed.

While I agree with you about being tactful in times of death, nursing homes are really only about filling an empty room. My guess is that the home will remove her personal possessions nearly instantly and put them into storage for the family to pick up. If the family is lucky, they make actually be given a couple of weeks to do the pick up. I wouldn't be suprised however to find it was 1 week or less.

Agree with the other poster - call the nursing home and cite your concern. If you know who is handling the estate you can also tell them the same.

My very best to you in this time - you've certainly had a lot on your plate.
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Old 03-23-2016, 02:00 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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We had 3 or 4 days when my mother died.
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Old 03-23-2016, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
Germaine - I'm sorry if this means your lovely aunt has passed.

While I agree with you about being tactful in times of death, nursing homes are really only about filling an empty room. My guess is that the home will remove her personal possessions nearly instantly and put them into storage for the family to pick up. If the family is lucky, they make actually be given a couple of weeks to do the pick up. I wouldn't be suprised however to find it was 1 week or less.

Agree with the other poster - call the nursing home and cite your concern. If you know who is handling the estate you can also tell them the same.

My very best to you in this time - you've certainly had a lot on your plate.

Yes, my aunt has passed away. I really hate to contact my cousins about this (they are her niece & nephew not her children) right now. Since they live in the same town, I am assuming that the nursing home will ask them to remove everything. I was just trying to get some type of timeline.
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Old 03-23-2016, 08:31 PM
 
7,908 posts, read 7,240,556 times
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Briolat1 is right. They had a person pass away in my mom's shared room at her last stay, and the removal of things was within a day. The cops hauled away another roommate who had a bad mental reaction from prescription drug interactions. Same thing. Things were cleared out in a day or two to make room for the next one.
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Old 03-24-2016, 10:29 PM
 
Location: SW US
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My understanding with my Mom's assisted living apartment is that you can leave stuff there but you will have to pay a high daily rate, so it's cheaper just to remove it quickly.
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Old 03-31-2016, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Long Neck , DE
4,903 posts, read 3,012,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
My understanding with my Mom's assisted living apartment is that you can leave stuff there but you will have to pay a high daily rate, so it's cheaper just to remove it quickly.
^^^^^
That was the situation when we had to clear out my relative's belongings.
OP no harm in asking someone on the family for the picture.
'
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Old 04-03-2016, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,884 posts, read 17,196,676 times
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Default Update

Hello,
I spoke with my cousins and I asked about the painting. As I suspected my aunt had not marked it nor did they know it's history. She did not have a list of anything that was to go to anyone. My cousins were very happy to save the painting for me until the next time that I come to their town (they know that it probably won't be until summer).


I did not ask them how long they had to empty the room but my cousin said "we just quickly packed everything up and it is now in my spare bedroom".
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