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Old 01-07-2011, 04:25 PM
 
Location: In a cat house! ;)
1,397 posts, read 2,366,179 times
Reputation: 1407

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There are mannnnnny articles available about the dangers (or not) of BPA lined pet food AND human food packaging.

This info I received from the manufacturer of Felidae (Dog Food: All Natural, High Quality, Holistic Pet Food. Dog Foods, Cat Foods, Dog Biscuits) cat food via e-mail. (This is JUST food for thought.)

Quote:
Bisphenol A, or BPA, is used in the manufacturing of numerous products, including epoxy can coatings. The metal can industry has used epoxy can coatings containing BPA for decades.
Is it Safe?
Scientific evidence from several different regulatory agencies in the United States, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration), Europe and Japan has consistently shown these coatings to be safe. Consumers would have to eat more than 500 POUNDS of food in contact with epoxy resins EVERY Day of their lives to exceed exposure levels determined to be safe by the European Food Safety Authority and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Numerous studies that measure actual exposure levels have confirmed that typical exposure to BPA is approximately 1/1000th of safe exposure levels.
At present there is no viable alternative to epoxy coatings that meet the existing requirements of all products.
Facts:
There is not commercially viable alternative to epoxy coating can liners
BPA Epoxy Coatings is used to make protective coatings for metal food packaging and helps provide safe, wholesome and nutritious foods for people and pets throughout the world.
Exposure to BPA from the use of protective liners is exceedingly low
BPA derived can liners are approved for use by ALL food regulatory agencies around the world
Due to corroding effects of foods during processing, metal containers and lids are coated to, ensure safety and prevent adverse effects on food quality, wholesomeness and nutritional value due to contact with un-coated metal cans.
Today’s use of BPA-derived epoxy resins is the result of over 60 years of industry research to develop and provide can liners with the safest and most effective barrier available.

Respectfully,

Beth Morgan
Customer Service Representative
CANIDAE Corp.
1975 Tandem Way
Norco, Ca 92860
1-800-398-1600

CANIDAE® All Natural Pet Food
www.canidae.com
Interesting article...

Major Producers To Ditch BPA From Packaging:

Some companies view BPA as a concern and are or have made changes, and some companies do not.

Major Producers to Ditch BPA From Packaging : Kevin Trudeau Show


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Old 01-07-2011, 06:34 PM
 
Location: In a cat house! ;)
1,397 posts, read 2,366,179 times
Reputation: 1407
Both brands of cat food that I feed our felines contain BPA in the can liner. But then so does the bottle of Dr. Pepper that I like to drink every so often. What to do/or believe....
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:35 PM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,382,164 times
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Hi, yes I think it isn't good period. I called Wellness back awhile ago & they said "their 12.5 oz cans have it & the smaller 5.5 oz do not". I use ONLY the 5.5 oz.

Also, I think I saw Trader Joe's canned goods don't use it (somewhere online) but have yet to confirm. (Not that most use Trader's cat food but.. just fyi)

Ok, so my opinion is -- do not use it if you can help it -- or unless you can ask the maker if it is used in lining.
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:46 PM
 
Location: In a cat house! ;)
1,397 posts, read 2,366,179 times
Reputation: 1407
Quote:
Originally Posted by movintime View Post
Hi, yes I think it isn't good period. I called Wellness back awhile ago & they said "their 12.5 oz cans have it & the smaller 5.5 oz do not". I use ONLY the 5.5 oz.

Also, I think I saw Trader Joe's canned goods don't use it (somewhere online) but have yet to confirm. (Not that most use Trader's cat food but.. just fyi)

Ok, so my opinion is -- do not use it if you can help it -- or unless you can ask the maker if it is used in lining.
When I first heard about BPA, I was all worked up about it. Once I started checking into how much human food is packaged with BPA ... kinda got me to thinking.

If I believe... "Consumers would have to eat more than 500 POUNDS of food in contact with epoxy resins EVERY Day of their lives to exceed exposure levels determined to be safe by the European Food Safety Authority and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency" ... then I'd have to say I got worked up about nothing.
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Old 01-07-2011, 07:07 PM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,382,164 times
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Hi Lola,

I'm just playing devil's advocate but I believe that it accumulates, & we don't know longterm issues w/ it, thus safest way to deal w/ it in my book is to avoid it if at all poss. But I'm hypervigilant anyway, & maybe over the top but was raised to error on side of caution.
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,888 posts, read 10,169,962 times
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I am somewhat concerned but not quite to the level that I have ensured everything I buy in a can has no BPA in it. This goes for my human food as well as the cat food.
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:55 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 10,661,719 times
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BPA is one of those 'we don't really know" products. The US DHHS raised their concern level to the mid point and the uS FDA has asked for restrictions based on new testing. Canada, many european countries, and Japan all now have restriction on its use. Its true that as manufacture, the known risk are low. As the CANIDAE statement said, it's about 1/1000 of the safe exposure level in pet food cans, But Japan has moved to ban its use in pet food cans especially feline food. They did this because instead of removing the food from the can in a lab setting, they had it done as if in a consumer setting. No rubber or plastic spatulas but they decided to test using regular metal forks. If only a dozen particles was discovered under the old test, when metal forks or other common thing people use to get can food out of the can were used, it went to maybe 15,000 particles. So long as the liner remains intact with no damage, it was failry safe, but once the liner was scratched, it was way above safe exposure limits. How many times have you scratched the can removing the food? Now think of all the metal and plastic containers you use and check after removing the product is the interior is prestine as they need it to be safe or is it not so perfect?
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:16 PM
 
4,309 posts, read 4,955,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola4 View Post
Both brands of cat food that I feed our felines contain BPA in the can liner. But then so does the bottle of Dr. Pepper that I like to drink every so often. What to do/or believe....
How do you find out that kind of info? What to do/believe indeed. Something new every minute it seems.
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Old 01-08-2011, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,888 posts, read 10,169,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacificFlights View Post
They did this because instead of removing the food from the can in a lab setting, they had it done as if in a consumer setting. No rubber or plastic spatulas but they decided to test using regular metal forks. If only a dozen particles was discovered under the old test, when metal forks or other common thing people use to get can food out of the can were used, it went to maybe 15,000 particles. So long as the liner remains intact with no damage, it was failry safe, but once the liner was scratched, it was way above safe exposure limits. How many times have you scratched the can removing the food? Now think of all the metal and plastic containers you use and check after removing the product is the interior is prestine as they need it to be safe or is it not so perfect?
Now that's interesting. What I'm taking from this is an opportunity to do the reverse! As in, if we're concerned, maybe in the interim the thing to do is use a plastic spatula-type utensil to get the food out of our cans. Sounds like a plan to me!
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Old 01-08-2011, 08:47 AM
 
4,309 posts, read 4,955,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
Now that's interesting. What I'm taking from this is an opportunity to do the reverse! As in, if we're concerned, maybe in the interim the thing to do is use a plastic spatula-type utensil to get the food out of our cans. Sounds like a plan to me!
<rummaging in the kitchen drawer for the little mini-spatual>
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