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Old 04-09-2011, 10:36 PM
 
5,367 posts, read 6,232,257 times
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Default lion cut

We are considering a lion cut for our Maine Coon Mix, our Marshmallow.

He's a big boy, about 18 pounds, and super long fur, about 3 inches in places. He's a beautiful boy, but his fur is so matted.

We try to groom him, use a furminator, clip out matts, etc, but its just gotten beyond us. His poor fur is in bunches, especially under his legs, his front paws, along his belly. When you pet him it feels "bumpy". some of the mats have litter stuck in them! I try to worry it out, but he only holds still so long.

I considered a groomer, but have some doubts. Our vet suggested a lion cut, charge $100 Well, but that includes anesthesia, a heart monitor, and monitoring afterward. She said sometimes skin actually grows into the mats, and they can get infected, so we need to do something.

The cost isn't the pacing item. We could go to a groomer for about $50, but really the extra $50 is worth it for Marshmallow's health and safety.

But I'm not too sure about a lion cut. Isn't that a bit extreme? I've seen pictures, the poor cat is shaved right down to the skin! they typically leave the face, tail, and "boots". Well, I don't like that look, but perhaps best to get a fresh start. If they just shave off individual mats, it will be like big bald patches! But I'm concerned---would that be a shock for the animal? Used to all that fur, then "skinned"? I worry he would feel cold, the temperature change would be a shock, and the total loss of his fur would be distressing. I thought perhaps we could get him a little coat to wear while gorwing out? I know cats fur takes a long time to grow out.

Well, anyone had a lion cut and the cat had a bad reacton to it?
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Old 04-09-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
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Default WARNING! Groomers........

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
We are considering a lion cut for our Maine Coon Mix, our Marshmallow.

I considered a groomer, but have some doubts.
Good! I'm glad. A warning about groomers. Some are wonderful. Some will not tell you but cats are almost impossible to shave while conscious. So they slip the cat a strong "pill" of their favorite tranquilizer or even use something like Kitamine. Working in an Animal Hosp for years I saw people rush their cats from the groomer to us because the cat was not responding, having trouble breathing, vomiting, all manner of strange symptoms. One of our vets would have to call the groomer and try to get them to admit to what they gave the cat and when. I didn't know one groomer willing to get bitten and clawed by a cat when trying to groom it. They either drugged the cat in some way or refused to shave cats. A groomer is the last place to take a cat to be shaved.

Quote:
Our vet suggested a lion cut, charge $100 Well, but that includes anesthesia, a heart monitor, and monitoring afterward. She said sometimes skin actually grows into the mats, and they can get infected, so we need to do something.
Please go for $100 and let a vet handle it. Groomers are not vets and should not be administering drugs to cats for several reasons. The main one being they're NOT QUALIFIED. When and if something goes wrong... groomers cannot save the cat.

Quote:
The cost isn't the pacing item. We could go to a groomer for about $50, but really the extra $50 is worth it for Marshmallow's health and safety.

But I'm not too sure about a lion cut. Isn't that a bit extreme? I've seen pictures, the poor cat is shaved right down to the skin! they typically leave the face, tail, and "boots".
Many times the vet's goomer has no choice since the mats are right at the skin level. There's no teasing out or combing out the mat. To prevent this from happening again, the cat has to be brushed/combed almost every day.

Quote:
Well, I don't like that look, but perhaps best to get a fresh start. If they just shave off individual mats, it will be like big bald patches! But I'm concerned---would that be a shock for the animal? Used to all that fur, then "skinned"? I worry he would feel cold, the temperature change would be a shock, and the total loss of his fur would be distressing. I thought perhaps we could get him a little coat to wear while gorwing out? I know cats fur takes a long time to grow out.
I've never heard of one suffering from the cold after a shave but we always recommended the cat stay indoors until at least some of the coat grew back.

Quote:
Well, anyone had a lion cut and the cat had a bad reacton to it?
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Old 04-10-2011, 01:15 AM
 
5,367 posts, read 6,232,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by =^..^= View Post
Good! I'm glad. A warning about groomers. Some are wonderful. Some will not tell you but cats are almost impossible to shave while conscious. So they slip the cat a strong "pill" of their favorite tranquilizer or even use something like Kitamine. Working in an Animal Hosp for years I saw people rush their cats from the groomer to us because the cat was not responding, having trouble breathing, vomiting, all manner of strange symptoms. One of our vets would have to call the groomer and try to get them to admit to what they gave the cat and when. I didn't know one groomer willing to get bitten and clawed by a cat when trying to groom it. They either drugged the cat in some way or refused to shave cats. A groomer is the last place to take a cat to be shaved.

Please go for $100 and let a vet handle it. Groomers are not vets and should not be administering drugs to cats for several reasons. The main one being they're NOT QUALIFIED. When and if something goes wrong... groomers cannot save the cat.

Many times the vet's goomer has no choice since the mats are right at the skin level. There's no teasing out or combing out the mat. To prevent this from happening again, the cat has to be brushed/combed almost every day.

I've never heard of one suffering from the cold after a shave but we always recommended the cat stay indoors until at least some of the coat grew back.

Thanks for the reply, it makes me feel I'm doing the best thing for Marshmallow. He's so sweet, my gentle giant! Perhaps with a fresh start we can do a better job of grooming him, but right now its just impossible. He's not an outdoor cat, but even inside I fear he might feel cold for a few days, so I will get him a little coat.

Makes me think of a story I read about a nun who went out of the convent. After nearly 20 years of wearing that big habit and dress, she literally felt naked and vunerable without her yards of fabric swirlling about her. I imagine Marshmallow might feel vunerable, too, but we can't let him go like he is with those nasty mats!
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Old 04-10-2011, 06:04 AM
Status: "Love Wins in North Carolina!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
25,209 posts, read 16,421,672 times
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my neighbors have their main coon shaved every spring and he does just fine. do it and vow to be diligent about grooming him daily. you really owe it to him to keep his fur beautiful and healthy.
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Old 04-10-2011, 06:27 AM
 
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I used to do my cat with long fur all the time. But he did not need anesthesia. He liked his short fur, and would come home from the groomers with bows in this ears. It was hit and miss on finding a good cat groomer, I won't say he liked the grooming, but it cut down on matts, and "dingle berries". He never had a cut on him from the groomers.

My cat had very long fur with a thick, dense undercoat. We lived in Vegas, and he was so much cooler without all that long fur on him in the summer.
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Old 04-10-2011, 06:43 AM
 
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I agree have it done at the vet, and soon. From what you describe your kitty is in a lot of pain. Those mats HURT! I have a kitty friend who has fur like you describe and every time I am at her house I spend time hand-splitting her mats.

My care of her is a drop in the bucket to what she needed though. Last year I finally nagged and shamed them into having her shaved. She was like a new cat, walking around with out pain. I still hand-split when I am there, but the shaving helps a lot.

If you hand split even one on your kitty, all the way to the bottom of the mat you'd be appalled to see how much skin is being pulled and twisted in the mats.

So yes, have it done under anesthesia, then get the proper tools and brush her daily.

Keep her on a high quality canned diet, that will help too, and maybe add some fish oil to her food a few times a week.

PS The daily grooming is a great bonding experience for you both. You'll need to use a very soft brush at first, like a baby brush. Then as the fur grows in a more appropriate de shedding tool.
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Earth
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I agree that it sounds like the best thing to do. However, is the anesthesia really necessary? I just worry given Marshmallow's age, although it sounds as if your vet knows what he/she is doing. I would just ask if sedation, rather than anesthesia, is possible. If not, then I would still go ahead with the grooming treatment; I imagine those mats really do hurt and that Marshmallow will be much more comfortable after the treatment.
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
I agree that it sounds like the best thing to do. However, is the anesthesia really necessary? I just worry given Marshmallow's age, although it sounds as if your vet knows what he/she is doing. I would just ask if sedation, rather than anesthesia, is possible. If not, then I would still go ahead with the grooming treatment; I imagine those mats really do hurt and that Marshmallow will be much more comfortable after the treatment.
I didn't see an age mentioned, how old is Marshmallow?

A fast acting anesthesia such as sevoflurane would be safer than sedation.Hopefully, if anesthesia is needed, that is what the vet plans to use.

Perhaps some blood work first, depending on how old Marshmallow is.
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post
I didn't see an age mentioned, how old is Marshmallow?

A fast acting anesthesia such as sevoflurane would be safer than sedation.Hopefully, if anesthesia is needed, that is what the vet plans to use.

Perhaps some blood work first, depending on how old Marshmallow is.
LOL, I saw "18" and automatically thought age. However, I'm glad I misinterpreted it; I think Marshmallow's age is a huge consideration, and I second the idea of bloodwork, especially if he is an older cat

Oh, and BTW, Marylee, on a light note, if you do decide to get the lion cut, please post pics! Especially if you get him a little coat to wear (:
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Old 04-10-2011, 11:00 AM
Status: "Love Wins in North Carolina!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
25,209 posts, read 16,421,672 times
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once his fur grows out use the zoom groom. my goodness my DH and I get almost a whole nother cat each time we do it and we do it every day. Ragdolls are very furry. they don't like the furminator but they love the zoom groom. they wait in line and even nose each other out to get a turn. it must feel wonderfu. wish I was a cat.
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