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Old 10-31-2011, 10:36 AM
 
5 posts, read 57,140 times
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My friend has a male cat, not fixed. for over a year now he has been peeing everywhere it started in her son's closet, then moved to his room, now all over the house, mainly on things that are on the floor like clothing. The thing is that he does use the litter box, he just pees outside of it. What could be the problem? How can we stop it? The vets told her that even if he gets fixed it may not stop him from peeing every where. HELP!
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Old 10-31-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: In them thar hills
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Oh no, another cat pee house in the making!
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Old 10-31-2011, 02:10 PM
 
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What you're describing is precisely why unfixed male cats can be a nightmare in your home. The cat is marking the house as his, they like furniture, bedding and clothing because it has a strong scent of the humans living there. Just like cats excrete hormones by rubbing their face on you and other objects, and they have sweat glands between their paws which is why they will lovingly touch you with their paws [claws retracted of course], sometimes even in the face, to mark you as theirs. Once this behavior starts in the male cat you speak of, I'm not aware of any way to stop it. Cat urine will destroy homes by soaking into wood floors, furniture, mattresses, dry wall, etc., so I think the homeowner is going to face a very hard choice before long. Sorry I can't offer hope for change. There are plenty of cat forums that you would be better served getting the answers you seek. Just google "cat forums".
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Old 10-31-2011, 08:05 PM
 
Location: PA
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Out cat was fixed and still sprayed. We used pheromone spray with limited success. We took our Sparky to the vet to make sure he did not have crystals in his urine. Ulitimately he was put on prozac. He gets half a pill a day. It is the only thing that ever worked. I kid you not!!! The vet said the cat was stressed for some reason or another and this helps. This was Sparkys chance and I am thankful that it worked. It is so funny that my cat has an perscription account at CVS. To top it off, because Sparkey does not have insurance he qualified for some type of discount. It costs about $8/ mo for the prozac. At first when the vet suggested prozac I thought it was bizzare, but it works for us.
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Old 11-02-2011, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
6,632 posts, read 5,450,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k_whit123 View Post
My friend has a male cat, not fixed. for over a year now he has been peeing everywhere it started in her son's closet, then moved to his room, now all over the house, mainly on things that are on the floor like clothing. The thing is that he does use the litter box, he just pees outside of it. What could be the problem? How can we stop it? The vets told her that even if he gets fixed it may not stop him from peeing every where. HELP!
He should have been fixed BEFORE he started to spray urine around the house. I'm surprised the vet didn't encourage he be neutered. He needs to be neutered and she will know in a month or so if the problem will continue.
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Old 11-02-2011, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
What you're describing is precisely why unfixed male cats can be a nightmare in your home.

There are plenty of cat forums that you would be better served getting the answers you seek. Just google "cat forums".
This is a cat forum. She came to the right place. Most cats stop spraying after being neutered. It's still best to have them "fixed" before they start to spray. But that too is no guarantee as some neutered males, done quite young, will occasionally spray. Fortunately, all my male cats use the litterbox.
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Old 11-02-2011, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Suffolk County
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OK, I have to join into this one. I was going to ask the same question. My neutered male about 19 months old now still sprays. He was neutered when the vet told me to so the timing was right. He seems to start this at this time of the year, it's driving me crazy. I walk him on a leash in the back yard and have seen him spray many times on bushes, but 2x times now he has sprayed our bed, which he sleeps in too, at like 3 in the morning. Both times were on my wife's side, not sure if he's telling me something hehehe. Last night as we were eating dinner, he wanted to go out and started running around the house and then just jumped up onto the loveseat and sprayed. The loveseat thing is driving me crazy, it seems o me he does it for no reason. When I asked the vet last week he said I could try some drug, don't remember, but I really don't want to do that. I'm going to try the feliway thing again. Is there something about this time of year maybe that could make him do this? He was fine all summer and I thought this problem went away.
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Old 11-02-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,894 posts, read 10,254,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by =^..^= View Post
This is a cat forum. She came to the right place. Most cats stop spraying after being neutered. It's still best to have them "fixed" before they start to spray. But that too is no guarantee as some neutered males, done quite young, will occasionally spray. Fortunately, all my male cats use the litterbox.
I believe in fact this was moved from the Pennsylvania forum, hence that early reply; pretty sure I remember seeing it there.
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:07 PM
 
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He is not "spraying" it is legit pee
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Rural Western TN
6,168 posts, read 9,401,812 times
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what do you think spraying is?! its scent makring using urine...some cats will literally SPRAY it with force horizonatlly, other cats will simply pee on things...its still marking or "spraying"

1: he needs to be neutered plain and simple, there is aboslutly NO reason to keep him intact unless shes Showing him and planning to breed him, and since shes having this issue, shes not ready to be keeping intact cats and breeding...
but more so, for his health, intact males are prone to all kinds of cancers (most of which cant be seen until its too late) and those unessicary hormones pumping through his body with no outlet cause mental issues like high stress too.
so get him neutered. he wont miss his testicles, there not attathced to them like human males are...he wont even notice.
will this CURE the urination? possibly, possibly not, it will howeve rmean he cant get testicular cancer and his chances for other cancers are reduced.
remember after a neuter it can take up to 3 months to see any kind of behavioural improvments

2: he needs to be checked for kidney issues and crystals in the urine...sudden changes in litterbox habits are typically 1: stress, 2: Hormonal 3: health related.
if we remove the hormone aspect by neutering were left with stress and health. so rule out health! kidney, liver and crystals in the urine are typical causes of litterbox problems, but id do a full blood work up, just to be certain.

3: so weve removed hormones, and weve ruled out health and things still dont improve were looking at a menatl issue, typically caused by stress...
now we have to remmeber whats perfectly acceptable to us humans can be incredibly stressfull to a cat...ive known cats that freek out simply because the couch was moved to a different wall...or the litter is different ect..cats get stressed very easily and while it may seem like "nothings changed" silly things as simple as the litterbox isnt scooped enough for his liking, or someone changed the blanket on the back of the couch, ect can be enough to send them into a tizzy
and on that same thought path cats are incredibly picky about their litterbox, they dont like change...in general s a change in litter (even if its something humans cant tell like the manufacturor using a new formular) my female cat wont use the box at all if theres ANY poop in it...
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