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Old 04-10-2012, 02:35 PM
 
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My domestic has a wax plug in her right ear, she fought the vet off when he tried to remove it with an instrument and he gave us irrigation solution which was totally useless. And it's traumatizing to our cat to squirt solution in her ear, what a stupid idea. She was mad at me for a week. I'm wondering why a wax softener that they use on kids wouldn't work, like Debrox, which contains hydrogen peroxide and mineral oil. It could be warmed up, it's a little thick, put a dropper in and rub the ear for a bit and eventually, I think she would shake out the plug the way she shakes her head around because Debrox not only softens but it dissolves the wax. The vet doesn't recommend it but I can't figure out why. Anybody have any thoughts?
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Old 04-10-2012, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
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A wax plug? Does she have an ear infection or ear mites? I think you need to get a second opinion.
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Old 04-10-2012, 03:35 PM
 
Location: North Texas
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My vet has me get a cotton ball rip it in two drench the cotton with rubbing alcohol and then wipe the insides of my cats ears. She is a heavy wax builder cat- she is an inside cat and is always cleaning, but for some reason he told me she just produces more then other cats.
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Old 04-10-2012, 04:30 PM
 
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Got a cat that has one ear that produces a scary amount of wax. We stick a cotton ball in the ear, fold the ear over the hole and rub like crazy. Then we let him shake crap all over. I really don't think it's doing anything either. But the vet said it looked better. He also thinks there may be a growth down there too. However, he almost 19 and if it isn't bothering him yet, it's best to leave it alone.
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Old 04-11-2012, 05:26 PM
 
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judd2401....I'd try putting olive oil (room temp) in the ear.....works great for humans...why not cats?
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Old 04-11-2012, 05:58 PM
 
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I would maybe just try the mineral oil (or olive oil) first--- the hydrogen peroxide could dry out the ear and irritate some tissue.

Ask the vet about a possible yeast infection- they should be able to check this in office by taking some material from the ear and putting it under a slide. If it isn't mites and it isn't yeast, your cat could have allergies. Jonas is a very allergic cat who always has crud in his ears. Going forward try cleaning them out once a week so it doesn't build up again.

Worse case, you might want to consider sedating your cat so the vet can work the plug out. It must be irritating and painful and could cause damage to the hearing if left long term.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:55 PM
 
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I agree with trying just mineral oil. That's what I was advised to use, by my vet, for a cat who gets a wax build up. However, as was mentioned, if a swab has not been taken and checked for yeast and bacteria, that should be done.

Put a few drops in and massage the ear. Eventually the wax will start to work it's way out. However, if there is infection or yeast, antibiotics and antifungal may be needed. That's when you turn to the Tresaderm.

I also agree that, if there is no improvement you may need to consider that she will need to be anesthetized and the ear thoroughly cleaned out.

NEVER put alcohol in a cat's ears. It would burn like heck.
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Old 04-11-2012, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Monadnock region
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Judd... have you used debrox lately? I've tried it, and I can't say it's impressed me that much for removing waxy buildup. Worse part is that I really can't stand the crackly noise in my ear, and the itchiness! I can't imagine doing that to a cat with better hearing and who wouldn't understand what I just put in there.

William has one pore that sometimes over-produces wax (I've seen it so much it's 'drooled' out his ear!). His annual visit routinely involves about 8 or 9 swabs. Unfortunately, it only stays clean for a few days before it looks the same. When I take him in for the 'wax explosions', I do get drops to use with a cotton ball that seems to help. I think it's got some antibiotic since often there's a little bit of yeast infection down in there. My vet said we were lucky: William only had 1 of those pores (you can see the black dot), he's had another cat that had about 40 of them. That was a mess!! Mind you, Williams' other ear stays perfectly normal.

I'd be leary of using alcohol as well. you might just call and as the vet if oil would be a problem.
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:33 PM
 
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I appreciate all the posts, I would never use alcohol, "Ashley" goes wild when we go near her ears and I mean wild. Even when we wrap her up in a towel, she goes ballistic when we even try to look in her ear, she does the same thing at the vet and I think he doesn't want to be bothered so I think sedation and a good cleaning is what's going to be needed, I don't want to traumatize her because she's already very skiddish and is not a lap cat much to my disappointment, she's a rescue cat and certainly picked us out but despite being affectionate at times, she's more interested in monitoring/playing with our other cat who is a ferral, she is very enamored with Smoke who is a gorgious gray cat who is in love [no exaggeration] with my partner, she guards him while he sleeps and hisses at me! Won't let me touch her. Ashley is domesticated but it's her way or the highway when it comes to being cuddly and being petted. Thanks again everybody, I've never been a cat person and for 40 years I've had dogs, but I just love these cats. I'm wrapped.
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Old 04-12-2012, 02:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by judd2401 View Post
I appreciate all the posts, I would never use alcohol, "Ashley" goes wild when we go near her ears and I mean wild. Even when we wrap her up in a towel, she goes ballistic when we even try to look in her ear, she does the same thing at the vet and I think he doesn't want to be bothered so I think sedation and a good cleaning is what's going to be needed, I don't want to traumatize her because she's already very skiddish and is not a lap cat much to my disappointment, she's a rescue cat and certainly picked us out but despite being affectionate at times, she's more interested in monitoring/playing with our other cat who is a ferral, she is very enamored with Smoke who is a gorgious gray cat who is in love [no exaggeration] with my partner, she guards him while he sleeps and hisses at me! Won't let me touch her. Ashley is domesticated but it's her way or the highway when it comes to being cuddly and being petted. Thanks again everybody, I've never been a cat person and for 40 years I've had dogs, but I just love these cats. I'm wrapped.
Part of her reaction may be because right now it hurts. Once it's been all cleaned out, you can work on getting her to accept people touching her ears. Take it in very slow steps...first just touch near her ears for a few seconds, then give her a reward. Keep moving closer and closer, then start just touching her ear for a few seconds. And so on.

Sometimes I think the more independent kitties are the ones we love the hardest. There's something amazing about knowing you've earned the trust of this wild creature.
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