U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Cats
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-06-2013, 07:29 PM
 
30 posts, read 33,430 times
Reputation: 73

Advertisements

If I'm paying $1,000 a month for an apartment, I really don't want to be told what type of living things I can bring into my apartment unless, of course, I'm trying to keep 10 dogs in my home. I think that cats and dogs both have the potential to be highly destructive but how they behave is up to the owner and the training they've had. As for replacing rugs, every apartment that I've ever lived in usually replaces the rugs and slaps a fresh coat of paint on the walls after a tenant leaves as part of standard practice. So..it would not cost them an extra cent if the dog destroyed the rug because they were going to replace it anyway.

If a dog caused $10,000 worth of damage, I'd say that is an extreme case. Most apartment complexes have a weight limit and usually don't allow a dog more than 25 lbs in weight. I kept that limit in mind when I adopted my highly active herding dog. Most people would think that a herding dog would be destructive but she's not because they are mostly destructive only when they have energy pent-up from not being walked enough.

As for a dog biting someone, yes, there is always that potential. But, most people would sue the owner and not the complex since they had to be aware that the complex allowed dogs when they moved in and assumed that risk. Most complexes don't allow aggressive breeds such as pit bulls, Huskies, etc. I know it's not fair, but to be honest, there are some owners who are just so clueless about their dogs that I am glad in a way that they have that ban--not because I think all pit bulls are dangerous and I do feel sorry that they have that rep, but because some of those poor dogs are owned by people who let them run loose. Duh! If you own a dog that is aggressive why are you letting it run loose in an apartment complex in the first place?

Last edited by LitGaL; 12-06-2013 at 07:47 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-06-2013, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,755,845 times
Reputation: 47043
Quote:
Originally Posted by LitGaL View Post
If I'm paying $1,000 a month for an apartment, I really don't want to be told what type of living things I can bring into my apartment unless, of course, I'm trying to keep 10 dogs in my home. I think that cats and dogs both have the potential to be highly destructive but how they behave is up to the owner and the training they've had. As for replacing rugs, every apartment that I've ever lived in usually replaces the rugs and slaps a fresh coat of paint on the walls after a tenant leaves as part of standard practice. So..it would not cost them an extra cent if the dog destroyed the rug because they were going to replace it anyway.

If a dog caused $10,000 worth of damage, I'd say that is an extreme case. Most apartment complexes have a weight limit and usually don't allow a dog more than 25 lbs in weight. I kept that limit in mind when I adopted my highly active herding dog. Most people would think that a herding dog would be destructive but she's not because they are mostly destructive only when they have energy pent-up from not being walked enough.

As for a dog biting someone, yes, there is always that potential. But, most people would sue the owner and not the complex since they had to be aware that the complex allowed dogs when they moved in and assumed that risk. Most complexes don't allow aggressive breeds such as pit bulls, Huskies, etc. I know it's not fair, but to be honest, there are some owners who are just so clueless about their dogs that I am glad in a way that they have that ban--not because I think all pit bulls are dangerous and I do feel sorry that they have that rep, but because some of those poor dogs are owned by people who let them run loose. Duh! If you own a dog that is aggressive why are you letting it run loose in an apartment complex in the first place?
They go after the Deep Pockets not the reasonable one to sue. A renter is not going to have as deep pockets as the owner of the complex.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2013, 09:36 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 89,178,767 times
Reputation: 30264
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
They go after the Deep Pockets not the reasonable one to sue. A renter is not going to have as deep pockets as the owner of the complex.
I was attacked by a dog when I was a teen, and my parents didn't sue. My arm got torn up. It would take a lot to make me want to sue someone, like if a dog attacked my face and it needed to be completely reconstructed. I don't even think health insurance would allow it to be covered if it happens on another person's property. That's another reason why the property owner could be sued---the victims health insurance might require they pursue the property owner since most states require homeowner insurance and car insurance to cover accidents that happen in homes and cars. I sure wouldn't want to wait until court battles were over to receive medical care. If you're attacked by a dog and end up in the ER, it's best to say it happened on public property and you have no idea who owns the dog, that it could have been a stray.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2013, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Northern California
970 posts, read 1,749,859 times
Reputation: 1390
I've rented with dogs and cats up until recently (because now we own a home). It sucks paying extra on the deposit but that is part of owning a pet around here. The deposit is always refundable though; it's actually illegal in California to have any kind of non-refundable deposit in a rental contract.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2013, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
7,201 posts, read 11,362,502 times
Reputation: 5357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
....This is why I taught my children to not become pet owners until they were homeowners. I feel very strongly that pets shouldn't be at risk of becoming homeless due to taking on pet ownership prior to being able to truly afford a pet in every aspect. .....
You did well. If only everyone taught their kids that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2013, 07:08 PM
 
30 posts, read 33,430 times
Reputation: 73
Hopes, I agree that it's best to wait until you become a homeowner to own a dog, but not everyone has that option nor does everyone want to own a home. Apartment managers have to deal with people leaving trash behind, causing fires by smoking or burning candles, throwing wild parties, and so on. When you're dealing with humans anything can happen, so why make it so hard for pet owners when most of them are responsible?

I think managers should take it on a case by case basis. I always have my former apartment managers write a reference letter stating that my dog was well behaved and did not damage the apartment. I find that references like that make it a little easier to rent with a dog..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2013, 07:22 PM
 
5,880 posts, read 11,798,041 times
Reputation: 7989
If no one took pets until they owned a home there'd be so many pets without homes. I've had cats all my adult life, and do not own my own home. I grew up in rentals, and we always had pets.

I have not been, and may never be, in a position to be able to buy a home. I've always managed to find a place to live with my cats.

Perhaps the relative is being a bit too fastidious on rental choices. There are always places who will rent to pet owners. One cat? She's probably just being too picky.

Sometimes you have to compromise on your ideals a little when you have a pet to consider. "Getting rid" of the cat should not even be in her mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Cats
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top