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Old 12-03-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Ohio
14,315 posts, read 12,577,027 times
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A friend of mine faced the same dilemma. Only she was feeding about 10. All of which she had fixed, vetted and released long before she moved. She had another whole set of indoor cats and a dog.

She trapped every single one and took them with her.

She kept them all in the garage at her new house for several months before she let them outside.....only one disappeared.

She also emptied their used litter at different places all around the property, so their scent would be there and perhaps encourage them to stay once she let them out of the garage.

She never knew if that one tried to make it back to the old house or if something else happened to him.

BTW....she had a small hole cut in the side of her old garage, so her ferals always had access to warm bedding and food in her garage......she did the same with the garage at her new place once she let them out.
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Old 12-03-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,352,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie53 View Post
A friend of mine faced the same dilemma. Only she was feeding about 10. All of which she had fixed, vetted and released long before she moved. She had another whole set of indoor cats and a dog.

She trapped every single one and took them with her.

She kept them all in the garage at her new house for several months before she let them outside.....only one disappeared.

She also emptied their used litter at different places all around the property, so their scent would be there and perhaps encourage them to stay once she let them out of the garage.

She never knew if that one tried to make it back to the old house or if something else happened to him.

BTW....she had a small hole cut in the side of her old garage, so her ferals always had access to warm bedding and food in her garage......she did the same with the garage at her new place once she let them out.


Perfect!!

My late brother and his wife had/has a feral cat "sanctuary" (for lack of a better word). They have a feeding station and various places around their property where the cats can get out of the weather. Every new cat that shows up is trapped and spayed/neutered. The ones that tame down enough are welcomed into the house.

When my brother passed away almost three years ago, I asked my sister-in-law if she planned on staying at their place. The reason I had asked was because it was an older house on a very large lot - quite high maintenance, especially for someone who had always been married and who had never lived independently. She seemed a little surprised that I would even ask and she told me she could never leave - because of the cats.
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Old 12-04-2013, 09:58 AM
 
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Wow. I have the same problem. I retired and would like to relocate but I've been feeding two cats that a 'rescue' group 'neuter/released'. The rescue group only feeds on weekends. I emailed them but they don't respond. One cat won't come near me but the other will eat if I'm in the yard. I maxxed out on indoor cats that go berserk when they see these two so bringing them indoors is not an option. So here I stay.

Regarding your situation, if you can, I'd try to bring him indoors. He's too young to be euthanized unless he tests FIV positive. If he's been fed since a kitten, he won't be a good hunter. Only true ferals are good hunters. If he were a true feral you could just leave him but it sounds like he's accustomed to taking food from humans so he's not a true feral. That's just my opinion and experience with rescues. Good Luck !
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Old 12-04-2013, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,936,243 times
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Default Part I of my reply

Keeping it brief - I hope...try and take him with you. Being neutered mostly removes his "imperative" to claim territory and fight for it, but that's about the only positive aspect to leaving him behind. Many if not most outdoor cats are actually not feral in the strictest sense of the word. This seems to hold true here. During my months-long adventure which in the end brought me a new feline housemate, I learned this. Assumptions were made that "Blaliko" was feral because of her extreme cautiousness around humans. Not so. Had this been the case she'd be dodging me to this day.
Your scent was "imprinted" in that cat's brain a long time ago. He associates it with food, water, and security, no matter how otherwise "wild" he may be. That acclimation gives you a starting point - however small - toward getting him eventually better used to you. So please consider what I think to be the right thing.
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Old 12-04-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,936,243 times
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Default Part II of my reply

Now it's time to bring up another alternative I haven't yet seen in this thread.
Why not make caring for this cat a condition under which you'll sell your house? You could even use this as a marketing tool to attract more potential buyers. ('cause you know how we cat people can be. )
Ten years or so ago, when a radio "personality" in Boston retired he faced a quandary. His spacious suburban home held easy profit-making potential. But over a long period of time his assiduous efforts to draw bluebirds to the property had succeeded. What to do? Maintaining the bluebird boxes and tending to the birds' needs was made an ironclad condition in the purchase-and-sale agreement. Knowing that it would help draw interest, the other "jocks" on the station made it a point to work in snarky remarks about "a man and his birds" on the air to help market the place. It worked!

And...at the end of the summer a friend had to relocate because his landlord wanted to sell his duplex as a vacant house. When he'd moved in it was discovered that a cat was already a tenant. Her human(s) had "forgotten" her when they left. But, being a cat, she'd adjusted to this just fine and naturally didn't question the fact that her source of attention and sustenance had changed. The dilemma arose when my friend's relocation was a done deal. "Woodie," so named for the street she lived on, was out of sorts in the new place. She showed no interest in exploring her turf. As an experiment she was taken back to the old house. Upon arrival she happily bounded up the front steps and made it difficult to catch her to bring her to the human's new home - where she promptly proceeded to mope around again. Talk about ego deflation! Woodie preferred familiar surroundings to the person who'd been caring for her for several years. A neighbor of the vacated duplex gladly agreed to watch out for and feed her, potentially on a permanent basis if the new residents weren't amenable. This paragraph was thrown in because it seems that at least one of the OP's neighbors might prove to be OK with taking over the feral's care. Maybe the final choice could be left to the cat if so. Woodie showed that this can be done.
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Old 12-04-2013, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
77 posts, read 90,032 times
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Thanks everyone for the great information, stories and suggestions.

I will reach out to my neighbors and possible volunteers. If that doesn't pan out, I like the idea of including a must-feed-cat condition in the selling of my house. As the cat (his name is Lulu) has gotten older, he stays close to the house a lot more. He's definitely attached to our backyard, our neighbors' backyards and the closed off alleyway behind it. Like I said I think he was born in the backyard because I heard yowling a few days before Lulu showed up as a kitten (with his two sisters and mom, now all of them gone.)

Thought about taking him with us, but we are moving to an apartment out of state PLUS moving our two indoor kitties with us. We won't have a safe appropriate place to put him in the meantime. Bums me out.
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Old 12-09-2013, 12:20 AM
 
Location: California
29,613 posts, read 31,923,958 times
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I'd definitely look into having whoever takes over your house take over the feeding duties. You can even provide a years supply of cat food or something as an incentive. My house almost came with a rabbit (in a hutch, not ferel) but it died before we moved in. We had already agreed to caring for it though, and that would have been more work than putting out food for a feral cat. Most people are good.
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Old 12-11-2013, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Big skies....woohoo
12,421 posts, read 2,789,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NARFALICIOUS View Post
What I would do, and this is just me, is trap him and take him with me and feed him in the new location. After knowing an animal that long, I couldn't just let him be if I knew he didn't know how to take care of himself. (Although I think a lot of cats can be naturally good hunters/scavengers if they need to be)

Easy way to trap him, just get a big tub or crate, put his food in there, and use a rope to drop it over him or close the opening or whathaveyou. I don't think this would be stressful for me. Pretty easy actually because I can be creative.
He's definitely going to eat so that part of the trap is a given. Just a matter of you making the trap.

I think the part about him moving to a new territory might be stressful but I'm sure he can get used to it. If some of the things he's used to are at the new location, he might feel better. Obviously bring the same food and bowl. Do you leave a blanket or little hut for him outside? Is there a particular flower that you see him going near? Odd question, but where does he poop/pee currently? Is there anything else he likes to hide behind or rub up against that you can bring with you?
one step further...could you build a pen at your new home? He would be safe and could have access through a cellar window if he wanted to go inside. You could even start putting his food inside to get him used to being indoors.
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Old 12-11-2013, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Big skies....woohoo
12,421 posts, read 2,789,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
I'd definitely look into having whoever takes over your house take over the feeding duties. You can even provide a years supply of cat food or something as an incentive. My house almost came with a rabbit (in a hutch, not ferel) but it died before we moved in. We had already agreed to caring for it though, and that would have been more work than putting out food for a feral cat. Most people are good.

No, most people aren't good....at least not good enough to do this. When we bought our house there were 2 adult cats, starving btw, and 4 kittens, who were supposed to have been fed by a neighbor. There was plenty of food, but no one bothered. That was 4 years ago....we have them now.

Last edited by Mainer61; 12-11-2013 at 05:10 PM.. Reason: ll
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