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Old 12-25-2013, 06:55 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
7,596 posts, read 5,108,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
When I see those videos people post of their kids manhandling some pet and they think it is cute I feel like reaching through the monitor and choking those parents. Kids need to be taught that small animals are not rag dolls and are living, breathing beings that need tenderness.

Wonderful story about Stormy, so glad his neck wasn't broken and that he finally found a great home. That is what he deserves.

Yesterday when my Son and I went to the pet store to buy our 3 their Christmas toys we stopped and looked at the cats up for adoption there........big mistake because I could take every one home if I could. But there was a nice young guy there who was on his second visit to see one cat in particular that he was thinking of adopting and the cat reached out with his paw when he saw the guy there. I told the guy I think you have found a new buddy, and I sure hope he took him/her home with him. You could tell he was really liking the cat and I think would make a good parent.

Don
I hope so too. Would make a perfect Christmas present for both of them.
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Old 01-25-2017, 12:45 AM
 
1 posts, read 275 times
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Question Similar Problem with hissing

I am having a similar problem with my 3 year old male cat. He has hissed at my 11-year old daughter 3 times, and swatted at her once. After the first time I recommended that she wait for him to approach her for pets, she insisted that he did. The second time I also did not see it, but I heard it. But she says he came to her and when she moved he hissed at her.

The third time she was sitting at the computer, and the cat jumped into her lap. I saw it that time. He pawed at her hand like he wanted pets and then when she moved to pet him he hissed and swatted her. She is very quiet bookish kid, quieter generally speaking than the 3 adults in the home, and none of the adults or our guests have seen him behave like that with anyone else.

Is this some strange dominance behavior? is he just a jerk? What can we do?
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Old 01-25-2017, 02:35 AM
 
11,686 posts, read 13,087,938 times
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I have seen many cats and some dogs be very wary and unfriendly around young children. I would never have thought that this behavior was unusual. Aggression with a passive person is something else again as in Adribach's posting.

My grandmother had a pet cat. It was a very nice animal, but clearly a one-person cat and did not want to have too much truck with other people. But it had one very weird habit: when she was on the phone it would nip her ankle! Otherwise it was totally her buddy, but the phone was a no-no.

Last edited by kevxu; 01-25-2017 at 02:44 AM..
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Old 01-25-2017, 03:57 AM
 
5,876 posts, read 11,756,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adribach View Post
I am having a similar problem with my 3 year old male cat. He has hissed at my 11-year old daughter 3 times, and swatted at her once. After the first time I recommended that she wait for him to approach her for pets, she insisted that he did. The second time I also did not see it, but I heard it. But she says he came to her and when she moved he hissed at her.

The third time she was sitting at the computer, and the cat jumped into her lap. I saw it that time. He pawed at her hand like he wanted pets and then when she moved to pet him he hissed and swatted her. She is very quiet bookish kid, quieter generally speaking than the 3 adults in the home, and none of the adults or our guests have seen him behave like that with anyone else.

Is this some strange dominance behavior? is he just a jerk? What can we do?
Follow my advice that I wrote to the original poster in this thread. Take him to the vet. Make sure he is peeing and pooping normally.

If he has been "declawed" (toe amputation) have his paws x rayed and evaluated for bone chips, claw regrowth and abscesses. Have his body x rayed too to check for early arthritis (common in declawed cats)
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Old 01-25-2017, 04:05 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
4,294 posts, read 2,882,400 times
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I am related to your trouble. quiet some time ago I took over a cat from a friend of mine,,, that also a moving. They had 4 kids, and the cat is the true lover of these kids. But they left him behind so when I got my daughter cat shows the unhappiness. with being angry with my daughter. When my daughter grows up cat walk away,,, and still do. I took her to vet he was healthy. vet said that is possible the pain that cat had at the moment they left him behind traumatized him. Still he does not like my daughter. But daughter knows so the do cat so at least peace. But yes make sure nothing health wise is.
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Old 01-25-2017, 04:16 AM
 
3,272 posts, read 1,946,787 times
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If this is a sudden change in behavior, I would take the cat to the vet. Suddenly becoming foul-natured, hissing, swatting, etc. can be a sign of illness. If the cat is not sick, it possible he is associating your child with something that startled or traumatized him. It could be something as simple as she broke a glass, or slammed a door, etc. But definitely get the kitty checked-out; that would be my first move.
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Old 01-25-2017, 05:47 AM
 
Location: SoFlo
777 posts, read 488,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catdad7x View Post
I totally agree with you. I have seen the same thing, and I wish people would train their children on how to handle cats/kittens, puppies, etc.. That's what happened to my old tomcat Stormy. He was about 12 weeks old when he came to our vets office with his head bent over to one side and unable to move it. He was brought in by a woman with a toddler and another spoiled brat (my wife's words) and said they 'fell on him'. The vet thought he had a broken neck, but turned out it was just a bad sprain and a steroid shot fixed him right up. The woman never came back or called, and had left bogus information, so he was abandoned there. My wife was working there at the time and she and Stormy bonded, so we ended up adopting him. He turned out to be about the best cat anyone could wish for.
catdad, thank you so much for taking Stormy, so glad this had a happy ending!
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Old 01-25-2017, 03:05 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
7,596 posts, read 5,108,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klaucka View Post
catdad, thank you so much for taking Stormy, so glad this had a happy ending!
It was a pleasure. He was a special cat indeed. He lived to be almost 18, and has been at Rainbow Bridge for over a year now. He and my late wife were thoroughly enthralled with each other, and it comforts me to know they are back together again.
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Old 01-25-2017, 04:32 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,123 posts, read 29,952,834 times
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Make sure he has his Ears checked!
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Old 01-28-2017, 08:27 PM
 
608 posts, read 296,752 times
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Seven years is a long time...just because your cat used to like kids doesn't mean he likes them now. Cats age just like people do and like a lot of people when they get older, he may no longer be amused by kids' antics. Or maybe he's developed a negative association with a smell or sound that comes from the kids.

Of course do get the cat checked out medically. But maybe just accept the cues he's giving you and keep the kids away.
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