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Old 01-08-2014, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
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My 3 year old cat Toby, strangely enough, does not purr. Never has since I adopted him. I've never heard of a cat that doesn't purr. What is his problem?

Kitty Toby:

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Old 01-08-2014, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
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Some cats don't. Of all the cats we have had over the years we had some who did and some who didn't. Just like some people snore and others don't.

Don
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:22 PM
 
Location: northwest Illinois
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Have you ever put your head on his belly and LISTEN? Some cats purr very quietly, but almost all do. Some are even 30-40 decibels! :O
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:31 PM
 
Location: FL
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Toby is a very handsome guy and looks quite content. I've never had one that didn't purr but it's possible, they're all different.
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:56 PM
 
Location: in my mind
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I love when cats get caught with their tongue sticking out like that - too cute!!
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Old 01-09-2014, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
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Right now with the two new ones, we have one who seems to have started purring and one who seems to not be purring. It's hard to say because even the one I've caught purring at times basically stops if I put my head closer to listen. I guess it's going to be a little while before I can put my ear up against the side of a cat and hear the vibration directly, heh.
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Old 01-09-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
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If I recall correctly it is something they learn from their mothers as young kittens and it you cat started out born to a feral mom he would not have learned to since being quiet equals being safer.

I have one that started life that way and she only rarely purrs when snuggled up with one of the dogs and it is extremely soft and hard to hear.
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:01 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
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Jingles begins to purr in that dreamy state just before sleep finally comes.
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:32 AM
 
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One of our cats recently turned 11. He was always a scaredy-cat and very insecure.

After the loss of a particularly b*tchy (but special) kitty a couple years ago, our household has settled into cat Zen. The 11 year old never purred before . . . and now it seems he is always purring.
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Old 01-09-2014, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,730 posts, read 10,929,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
If I recall correctly it is something they learn from their mothers as young kittens and it you cat started out born to a feral mom he would not have learned to since being quiet equals being safer.

I have one that started life that way and she only rarely purrs when snuggled up with one of the dogs and it is extremely soft and hard to hear.
Weasie was on "auto-purr" throughout her nineteeen years. So, despite my spending childhood and adolescence with cats who did and didn't purr much, the comparative absence of it with my current "grrrrrlz" is still taking some getting used to after over 18 months. But this quote confirms what I'd suspected. Blaliko first appeared on my property as a highly skittish cat-olescent, probably 1-2 years old, and retained "feral" behavior for the better part of a year. These days she continues to be sociable only when it suits her, and mostly just for "kitty quickies" (see separate thread with that title.) However, when the stars are perfectly aligned she knows how to let it rip. Meanwhile, her daughter Seteria is even less purr-prone. Her being born outdoors and not TNR'd until she reached five months goes a long way toward explaining this. Strangely, though, she rumbled a lot more readily in the initial time frame after she settled in. Lately it's only through feeling the vibrations and picking up faint sounds that I can tell she's purring at all.
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