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Old 01-12-2014, 10:26 PM
 
5 posts, read 5,132 times
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My Data was found by a former friend of mine on the side of a road. She picked him up, brought him back to my room and literally DROPPED him onto me as I was in bed, due to BACK SURGERY. She didn't hardly look at him, he had been burned on his paw pads and his ears were black with earmites! We had him fixed ASAP, and treated his mites. We now believe the mites caused brain damage causing him to have seizures...but recently, within the last year he has begun mounting our oldest male (all cats and dogs were fixed as soon as vets were willing to.) And one of my girls as well as biting and air humping a blanket. I'm pretty good on knowing cats, way before Jackson Galaxy and his show, but this makes my brother mad and I called my vet to ask and a nurse wouldn't listen and said I needed to get rid of the cat! Could this possibly be caused due to his brain damage...or less likely, wasn't properly fixed? Please, I need an answer, I can't take him to the vet because I have one that is sick and must go in the morning for a physical and blood tests.
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Old 01-13-2014, 12:18 AM
 
4,787 posts, read 8,752,051 times
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How long ago was the cat neutered? years ago, months ago ?

This behavior can be caused by several things. An adult cat has already learned certain behaviors. In the case of an un-neutered male cat he undoubtedly bred female cats many times in the past. This is a behavior he has learned. Neutering usually stops the behavior. However, in some cases, it can continue. It's not all that unusual.

Another possibility. If he was neutered a year or more ago and did not do this, did it just suddenly start?
If it did , it might be from learned sexual behavior. However, it could also be caused by stress and/ or dominance issues. As with dogs, humping is not always about sex play, it's about saying " I'm the boss. "

You seem to have a number of pets in the house. Have you added any new pets of any kind recently ? If you have, then you've upset the balance among the pets. Your cat may be acting out because he is stressed and is telling you he is not happy about the new arrival.

You can probably get decent ideas off the internet about how to distract or modify the behavior. I do not think it is caused by brain damage. I think you've got much more simple explanations.

By the way, when you speak to your vet, suggest to him that his vet tech, receptionist or whoever answered the phone when you called, is not to give out advice. She has no business telling to you to get rid of a cat. That's not her job.
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
2,050 posts, read 1,762,143 times
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I don't believe the humping is due to brain damage. I've heard it can be about dominance. Our Tucker will sometimes try and mount our Benny, or sometimes even a toy. (He was neutered at six months.)

I would not worry about this. If it really bothers you, you can try to distract him with a toy. I usually leave Tucker be unless, of course, he is causing distress to Benny. Then I will distract him so he stops.
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Old 01-13-2014, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,434 posts, read 41,608,566 times
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Oscar does this to Langley, his brother, all the time. It doesn't seem to faze Langley but it bothers me so I shoo him away. It only happens in bed at night while langley is sleeping and oscar mosies over to him. And there is no question that Oscar has dominance over the whole family. Langley is shy and doesn't have a dominant bone in his body. Both are fixed.

Toby the maltese does this to Lucy the Bichon almost every time after they come in from a nice long walk. He looks like he is trying to ride her while she is walking away. He never does it while she is still. I think he is just excited and wants to play. he is a perpetual annoying baby brother.

Everybody in my house is fixed including all adult people too!

BTW I never heard of ear mites causing brain damage. maybe compromise hearing but certainly not brain damage.
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Old 01-27-2014, 01:23 AM
 
5 posts, read 5,132 times
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Default Data

No, Data is almost 5, so he's been fixed for over 4 years. He's the last cat I got. Every animal here was here before him and fixed before he arrived. He's seizures have suddenly become VERY frequent as of the past week. I mean, the mites probably caused brain damage, but for all we know somebody could have beat him in the head. I don't like being told to get rid of a cat. I'm convinced its brain damage. When he first started having seizures 3.5 years ago he suddenly started being a bully
Then in the spring he had them more than normal and suddenly he's humping. We HAVE another cat that will kick Data's butt once in a while, when he's picked on others a lot. I've NEVER had a cat do this. We had cats my whole life, I'm good with their behaviour, but this doesn't seem like everyday dominance, its not every day even. I just don't think my mom's theory of not being fully neutered holds any water.
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Old 01-27-2014, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,434 posts, read 41,608,566 times
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Is he taking any meds for his seizures? Has he been to the vet lately. I'm more concerned about his seizures than the humping. Every male animal I've ever had has done this to one extent or another. it has nothing to do with being "not fully neutered".
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Old 01-27-2014, 08:06 AM
 
4,787 posts, read 8,752,051 times
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Ear mites really can't access the brain. I think the cat needs to see a vet immediately. A more likely cause of the seizures is a brain tumor or other inflammation in the brain. This is especially a concern as the seizures are increasing. This is far more serious than ear mites.

The behavior changes ( not the humping which s normal) may be are related to whatever is going on in his brain.
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Old 01-27-2014, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Colorado
9,734 posts, read 6,265,376 times
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I concur, I think that there is a neurological issue that is completely unrelated to the ear mites, and hope you get a good vet to figure it out.

The only logical explanation I can think of for the bullying behaviors and all, besides being simply caused by the underlying problem (such as brain tumor or what have you) is that perhaps as the seizures reveal weakness to all and sundry, the cat feels the need to overcompensate for that by acting super tough. Cats, after all, do NOT like to show weakness. But one can hardly hide a seizure.

Either way, seek the cause of the seizures, I don't think it had anything to do with mites.
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Old 08-07-2014, 07:12 AM
 
5 posts, read 5,132 times
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Fluffer us 20, he was neutered like 19 years ago, as soon as he was old enough to be fixed. I'm wondering now if he's unintentionally putting out some sort of hormone or something, the young cat I originally was talking about is not the only one doing it, a 9 year old male has started too.
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Old 08-07-2014, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,434 posts, read 41,608,566 times
Reputation: 46993
all males, human and animal are obsessed with humping. It's just their thing.
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