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Old 01-28-2014, 07:05 PM
 
4,226 posts, read 4,579,032 times
Reputation: 4895
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
And your degree is in what area of veterinary science ? Yeah, those Vets "who know next to nothing about feline nutrition " can't possibly know as much as someone who reads about these things on the internet. Years of schooling is SO overrated.

Don
I don't need a veterinary degree to understand that a cat is an obligate carnivore and was never meant to live on dry cereal. I didn't always think of it in quite those terms of course. It's only the past 7 years I've been really actively learning. However, I had a vet tell me, back in 1985, when my male cat developed cystitis (before "veterinary diets" were all the rage) that I should feed my all cats canned food and only canned food.

However there are a few vets out there who've done their share of learning and willing to pass the information onto the rest of us

A few examples

Dr Jean Hofve Little Big Cat | Mind-Body Consulting for Cats

Dr Elizabeth M Hodgkins Feline Longevity through Diet | All About Cats

And of course Dr Lisa Pierson Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health
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Old 01-29-2014, 04:13 AM
 
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Forgot one. Dr Karen Becker Why Dry Pet Food is Really Bad Nutrition for Your Cat

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Old 01-29-2014, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,882 posts, read 9,553,795 times
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I file Joseph Mercola firmly in the camp of quack (or at least supportive of possibly dangerous quacks) and I guess snake oil salesman since he's always selling something too. So I am suspicious of most anything that originates from mercola.com. No problem with the other three though. Just cautioning to be selective in what you cite as a source.
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Old 01-29-2014, 08:23 AM
 
Location: El Sobrante, CA
368 posts, read 204,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graytabbie View Post
What would you suggest as a good dry cat food for someone on a budget. And please, no replies about how bad it is. I am just asking for some good brand recommendations.
If you absolutely have to buy a non-premium brand, Purina One Beyond. It's free of the worst ingredients found in cheaper food.
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Old 01-29-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,882 posts, read 9,553,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbyJaneway View Post
If you absolutely have to buy a non-premium brand, Purina One Beyond. It's free of the worst ingredients found in cheaper food.
Chicken, chicken meal, whole brown rice, soybean meal.... Hm. The rest of the list is really not super offensive I suppose, but I wouldn't be a huge fan of soy either. Eh. It's so difficult. The trouble is, if you're choosing between this and, say, the one listed in the OP, which is really better? Is soy better than dried by-products and wood pulp? Sometimes I wonder. It is for people but I don't know if it really matters for cats as they could be equally useless. The soy will make the protein look higher I suspect but it probably isn't in a way that is useful to the cat.

In general though the rest of the list for One Beyond doesn't look too bad. Stick with the chicken if you're getting this. No need to introduce what is going to be low-quality salmon and the salmon bag is still more chicken meal than salmon anyway after it's dried.
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,810 posts, read 1,467,673 times
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Oh, look. An animal hospital that is actually talking about our favorite pet topic in here.

http://www.delrayanimalhospital.com/...ifeedmycat.pdf

Fascinating.
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:37 AM
 
4,226 posts, read 4,579,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
I file Joseph Mercola firmly in the camp of quack (or at least supportive of possibly dangerous quacks) and I guess snake oil salesman since he's always selling something too. So I am suspicious of most anything that originates from mercola.com. No problem with the other three though. Just cautioning to be selective in what you cite as a source.
Oh, yes. That's why I left her off in the first place. Then this early morning I forgot my mindset of the night before. I like that Dr Karen Becker promotes canned and raw feeding though. But I don't buy her products.
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Old 06-11-2014, 04:23 AM
 
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To the OP Graytabbie,
The Goodlife Chicken and The Goodlife Salmon products don't have powdered cellulose so I would switch to one of those and avoid their 'Indoor' bag for that reason.
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Old 06-11-2014, 11:24 AM
 
2,357 posts, read 1,933,206 times
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The issue with any dry food is that it is high in carbohydrates.

Carbs are metabolized as sugar.

Felines in the wild do not develop diabetes.

Domesticated felines can and do develop diabetes because of the prepared cat foods we feed them. Many canned foods are high in carbs....peas, carrots, blueberries...........all high carbs that cats do not need.
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Old 06-12-2014, 04:13 AM
 
4,226 posts, read 4,579,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocngypz View Post
The issue with any dry food is that it is high in carbohydrates.

Carbs are metabolized as sugar.

Felines in the wild do not develop diabetes.

Domesticated felines can and do develop diabetes because of the prepared cat foods we feed them. Many canned foods are high in carbs....peas, carrots, blueberries...........all high carbs that cats do not need.

The biggest issue with dry food is that it is dry. Cats on a dry diet are perpetually dehydrated.

The second issue is the high carbs. As you say, some canned foods can be almost as high as the dry foods, but at least they provide moisture.

But yeah, there is nothing good about dry "food", at all.
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