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Old 09-20-2016, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
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I have read a lot of conflicting advice and practices on when to neuter a kitten. Some places say it is okay at 2 months and 2 pounds, other say 3 months and 3 pounds, and still another at 4 months.

I also wonder it is better to wait to vaccinate until they are older, since most of the places that do the neutering also give the shots at the same time and maybe a younger kitten is not able to handle them as well?
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Old 09-20-2016, 01:07 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
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My wife & I took in more than a dozen homeless kittens over the past 25 years. We always had them spayed and neutered between 5 and 6 months of age (but no later than 6 mo.). Most rescue and foster programs will have it done as soon as they reach the 2lb mark, so as to get them adoptable as quickly as possible. So for them it's almost a necessity. But for one already adopted, it doesn't hurt a thing to wait a while. My vet actually prefers them to be a bit older when he does the surgery.

As for the shots, I can't say when we did the first vaccinations for sure as my wife always took care of that. But I want to say that I think it was around two to three months of age for the initial ones, then the rest (boosters ?) later while being neutered. but I could be off about that.

Hope this helps.
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Old 09-20-2016, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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We prefer to space out the vaccinations. It may mean an extra appointment or two, but IMO it's safer for the kitten to not overload their system. I'd start the vaccinations sooner and space them out over several months.

As for altering, we've had it done both ways--waiting until 5-6 months for three of them. Our youngest was about 12 weeks and was neutered at the shelter before we took him home. He seemed to recover quickly and was just fine.
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Old 09-20-2016, 01:55 PM
 
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Females can go into heat right around the 6 month mark, so we always had ours spayed around 5 months. And you don't want the boys to be mature enough to start spraying, either, so 5 months has worked out well for them as well. I am not a big fan of doing it at 2 months, although I absolutely understand why the shelters do that. We do start the vaccinations early, especially distemper, as it can be so deadly in a very young kitten. I think rabies has to wait until they are a bit older (at least in our state), and I am fine with that, as my cats do not go outside.
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Old 09-20-2016, 07:27 PM
 
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My vet prefers around 6 months or 6 lbs whichever comes first for both sexes.

My two youngest got the first of their kitten series at 6 weeks old, then 9 weeks, etc. Both boys (brothers) were neutered at 6 months exactly. Both were 5.5 lbs.

Received their first rabies shot at 3 months.
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Old 09-21-2016, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
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Have any of you had a kitten or cat have a bad reaction to a vaccine they were given?
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Old 09-22-2016, 10:39 AM
 
Location: southern kansas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vanguardisle View Post
Have any of you had a kitten or cat have a bad reaction to a vaccine they were given?
I can honestly say no. None of the almost 20 kittens I've been involved with ever had a bad reaction to vaccinations. Not saying it couldn't or wouldn't happen, just that I've never experienced it. I would think that the risk to kittens from those killer diseases far outweighs the risk of a reaction. Nothing worse than losing a kitten to something that was preventable, IMO.

However I do think those yearly (or bi-yearly) rabies shots the vets & local ordinances push are going overboard, and I don't do that. If your cats are indoor only, their risk for exposure is pretty much zero. So why load them up with vaccines they really don't need. If your vet requires those shots to be updated before treating your cat, my advice is to find another vet. It isn't necessary in most cases, and they are probably just doing it to up the bill a bit. My vet doesn't do that. He sends me reminders if they are due, but that's as far as he goes.

That said, if your cats are ever outdoors, it might be wise to have them regularly vaccinated. It only take one instance of contact with a sick cat or other critter to have tragic consequences.

Last edited by catdad7x; 09-22-2016 at 10:52 AM..
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Old 09-22-2016, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vanguardisle View Post
Have any of you had a kitten or cat have a bad reaction to a vaccine they were given?
YES in two different cats.

Our Benny was vomiting, ears/nose/paws bright pink, pacing. We took him to emergency vet for care. My husband took him in, and it was before we were married, so IDK what was done for him. NEVER AGAIN did I vaccinate him after that (he was 2 at the time, now is 16).

Our Ringo had a reaction to the distemper combo booster at age 1. He was hiding, not eating, had a fever, and cried out (from joint pain, from what I read). He got pain medication, fluids, and I think a steroid injection. We will not vaccinate him again either (he is 2 now).

We had taken precautions and had Ringo's vaccines given one per visit, and he still reacted to the final booster.

IDK how common reactions like this are. I asked our vet specifically to report Ringo's reaction to the vaccine manufacturer.

More common "reactions" are usually being tired for a day or two, or eating less.
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Old 09-23-2016, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Manchester, UK
918 posts, read 456,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catdad7x View Post

However I do think those yearly (or bi-yearly) rabies shots the vets & local ordinances push are going overboard, and I don't do that. If your cats are indoor only, their risk for exposure is pretty much zero. So why load them up with vaccines they really don't need. If your vet requires those shots to be updated before treating your cat, my advice is to find another vet. It isn't necessary in most cases, and they are probably just doing it to up the bill a bit. My vet doesn't do that. He sends me reminders if they are due, but that's as far as he goes.
My vet doesn't require but recommends yearly booster vaccinations (all the vets around here do). Not sure whether they really need them on a yearly basis however my pet insurance requires vaccinations to be up to date unfortunately.

Buffy was a little under the weather when she had her booster vaccination (she was fine when she had the initial shots). Just a little sleepy. She was back to her normal self the next day
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Old 09-26-2016, 12:06 AM
 
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I've always had my kittens spayed/neutered at 6 months, by which time cats generally achieve sexual maturity. But recently my vet neutered a kitten that needed surgery for something else at 4.5 months so that the kitten would only have to undergo anesthesia once.

I know for dogs research has been done that determined that the older sterilization is done the better for bone development in the dog. In fact there is a study of golden retrievers which shows that dogs neutered before 9 months have a much higher incidence of cancer than dogs neutered later. The study concluded that large breed dogs shouldn't be neutered until they are at least one year old, if possible. I don't know if similar studies have been done for cats.

Regarding issues with vaccinations, only one of all my cats had a bad reaction (trembling, drooling). She was fine the next day. I've had a lot of cats, so I guess I'd say in general that vaccines seem safe to me. There are many studies about "vaccine induced carcinoma", so maybe you want to read about that and discuss it with your veterinarian.

Enjoy your kitty!
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