U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Cats
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-01-2019, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,690 posts, read 7,788,347 times
Reputation: 16481

Advertisements

I live in a very stable community with a population of 1500 and an area of about one square mile, divided into roughly 40 blocks; neighbors get along well and properties are well-maintained. It's no secret that we like cats -- my two housemates and I have four (one of which we just had spayed and a dental problem fixed), the renter downstairs has two more, and my housemate's Mom has three more nearby.

The problem is that the neighborhood is over-run with feral cats -- most of them dropped off by irresponsible owners. Many of us can't help leaving out leftover cat food intended for the more fortunate house pets, and we've discovered several new litters this spring under nearby garages, sheds, etc.

The local ASPCA has an unwritten policy of euthanizing kittens upon arrival -- funds are limited and the demand for pets for adoption just isn't there. Once in a while, a large collection of ferals taken in -- usually by an elderly resident who lets her heart overrule her head -- simply disappears. A community of similar size about a dozen miles downriver has a similar problem -- but one of larger population (15000) just across the river doesn't -- possibly because greater numbers of fed-up neighbors are more prone to taking matters into their own hands, and/or because it's more likely to harbor a juvenile sociopath or two who prey upon harmless strays ??

As much as we hate to see innocent creatures suffering, I can't envision any kind of coordinated response to this issue above the local level; larger cities and states have bigger problems, and more vicious pests (usually of the two-legged variety) to be concerned about.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 09-01-2019 at 01:32 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-01-2019, 01:03 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
45,306 posts, read 3,436,349 times
Reputation: 14747
TNR can help reduce the population, over time. See if any of the cat charities can help. In a previous home,we did TNR volunteer work, it was so great not to have an endless stream of kittens, who were destined for a cruel life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2019, 04:22 PM
 
1,952 posts, read 707,917 times
Reputation: 3224
I have friends who do serious TNR. I used to help out.

My friend develops great colonies and brings some food. She gets as many as she can neutered. Stores love that because the cats are not in their trash looking for food, not wandering around making shoppers feel sad.

But then there are people who want to find that colony, kill the cats for fun or because they don't like cats around.

It takes a constant concerted effort. My friend is very into it and in charge of the local effort which she developed. She does get lots of donations in money, food, shelters. She is part of a program where she can get the cats medical care...neuter for sure and not sure of the prices for other medical issues.

She has been doing this for many years now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2019, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
2,439 posts, read 2,240,901 times
Reputation: 3115
Quote:
Originally Posted by evening sun View Post
TNR can help reduce the population, over time. See if any of the cat charities can help. In a previous home,we did TNR volunteer work, it was so great not to have an endless stream of kittens, who were destined for a cruel life.
Yes, TNR does work! You and your neighbors can work together to trap the cats and start controlling the population. Contact local shelters and see if any have a TNR program, where they spay for a low cost or even free.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Cats
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:30 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top