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Old 09-14-2019, 04:39 PM
 
395 posts, read 112,699 times
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- I obtained an 8-week male specimen yesterday
- the trip back and forth was long (about 12 hours) so I understand the kitten's distress given the situation
- the trip however provided an opportunity to for a decent amount of exposure and to desentisize his step-brother - 2.5yo Siberian Husky female against each other
- by the end of the trip they both stopped screaming each other






Now, while this is my first indoor kitten, I grew up on a farm with outdoor kittens (that had a serious hunting job to do on the fields), so I do have some long-past exposure to them.


Like babies, they use crying for everything - so food, litterbox shuts them up for a while, but there's one thing that makes it stop crying completely - human touch.


I took it to bed with me last night and it instantly stopped crying and didn't for next 4 hours. It found a happy spot on my chest, next to my face. It definitely loves my beard and it constantly pushed both paws against it, somewhat rhythmically, like a game or something - no idea what that is. Either way, she didn't try to flee from me, she felt safe in my arms - partially because I kept the Husky at my arm's length.






I work from home, so I can give it all the attention it needs, but need to make sure I don't mold into an emotional terrorist either. Not to mention separation anxiety that is a huge issue for my Husky.


I understand it depends on the temperament of the specimen in question, and it's going to take some time till I figure out what's his temperament.




So, how much love is too much for a little kitten ? Every couple hours walk with it in my arms is ok/little/too much ?
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Old 09-14-2019, 04:44 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
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Kittens will climb up and nestle at your neck every time you let them. But eventually, of course, they get too big for that and will fall off

They will set the terms for separation. Some like to cuddle every time you sit down; others are more independent. Some don't even want you swooping down and picking them up. Just like people, everyone's different.
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Old 09-14-2019, 04:48 PM
 
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Quote:
I work from home, so I can give it all the attention it needs, but need to make sure I don't mold into an emotional terrorist either. Not to mention separation anxiety that is a huge issue for my Husky.
HE (not it) is a baby who has just lost his entire world. Provide him with all the attention you can, love and play intertwined, and he will grow up into a confident loving cat, depending of course on his individual temperament.

He is also not a dog, so don't be making comparisons, but if you ignored dog when she was a puppy instead of paying attention to her needs, that is most likely the cause of the separation anxiety.

Animals need to learn how to feel confident and safe before they can become independent and content.

Quote:

It definitely loves my beard and it constantly pushed both paws against it, somewhat rhythmically, like a game or something - no idea what that is.
This is a normal kitten and cat behavior most often called kneading. Almost all cats do it when they are content and feel safe..

Quote:

Either way, she didn't try to flee from me, she felt safe in my arms - partially because I kept the Husky at my arm's length.
Up above you said this was a male kitten.
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Old 09-14-2019, 04:55 PM
 
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Be sure to feed him an all wet diet. Kittens need to eat frequently, at his age 6 meals a day, up to 10 or 12 ounces of wet food a day as they grow quickly and burn a lot of energy.

Since your kitten is really too young to have been taken away from mum and litter mates you may need to do some training regarding biting and grabbing with claws.

Provide him with plenty of scratching posts, sturdy ones, a variety of materials and shapes, and some stuffed toys about his own size that he can grab and kick and bite. (put this between his paws before engaging with him to teach him what is okay to bite and what isn't) Throw toys for running and chasing, string on a stick wand type toys for other Games (put those away when not in use) and a cat tree or tower for climbing and jumping. A fort or two will be enjoyed as well.

You will need to kitten proof your home as kittens can get into all kinds of trouble. Put away anything breakable or valuable until he grows up. Cats love gravity experiments so give him things he can safely knock down instead.


No dangling toys or strings or elastics or rubber bands left about.
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:09 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
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Kitten sounds adorable & keep on loving!!
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:34 PM
 
395 posts, read 112,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
Kittens will climb up and nestle at your neck every time you let them. But eventually, of course, they get too big for that and will fall off

They will set the terms for separation. Some like to cuddle every time you sit down; others are more independent. Some don't even want you swooping down and picking them up. Just like people, everyone's different.
Well, that was surprising for me - the neck thing. I can only compare it to my Husky and she never did that, even though she always needed to touch me at least indirectly with her back in the bed. But of course, Husky is not a cat.


Right now, I spent two hours by the keyboard, and he's been cleaning himself and sleeping on my chest the whole time. Not a beep, but prior to taking him out of his cage, he made quite a racket.


I need to keep him there for his safety now, as the weight discrepancy between him and Husky is just too dangerous. Not sure how to teach Husky to be gentler, as all this time we played quite rough with a Husky, and this creature is so fragile, I'm worried it'll break when I grab him...


But, Husky only licks him and does this weird pushing move with his nose - kinda like a cat rolling a mouse on the floor with her face, if you know what I mean.
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:39 PM
 
395 posts, read 112,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post
HE (not it) is a baby who has just lost his entire world. Provide him with all the attention you can, love and play intertwined, and he will grow up into a confident loving cat, depending of course on his individual temperament.

He is also not a dog, so don't be making comparisons, but if you ignored dog when she was a puppy instead of paying attention to her needs, that is most likely the cause of the separation anxiety.

Animals need to learn how to feel confident and safe before they can become independent and content.



This is a normal kitten and cat behavior most often called kneading. Almost all cats do it when they are content and feel safe..


Up above you said this was a male kitten.
For some reason I keep getting mixed whether it's a he or she.


When I got my Husky, I had a 9-5 job, so Husky was alone during the day for fist year, which is when the separation anxiety built up. Combined with boredom, I had to exchange all furniture


I do, definitely want him to be safe and confident - but then again - aren't all cats like that anyway ? Can a cat even have a separation anxiety ? Aren't they just naturally too independent for that ?




Kneading, huh ? Now I know what that word means
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:50 PM
 
395 posts, read 112,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post
Be sure to feed him an all wet diet. Kittens need to eat frequently, at his age 6 meals a day, up to 10 or 12 ounces of wet food a day as they grow quickly and burn a lot of energy.

Since your kitten is really too young to have been taken away from mum and litter mates you may need to do some training regarding biting and grabbing with claws.

Provide him with plenty of scratching posts, sturdy ones, a variety of materials and shapes, and some stuffed toys about his own size that he can grab and kick and bite. (put this between his paws before engaging with him to teach him what is okay to bite and what isn't) Throw toys for running and chasing, string on a stick wand type toys for other Games (put those away when not in use) and a cat tree or tower for climbing and jumping. A fort or two will be enjoyed as well.

You will need to kitten proof your home as kittens can get into all kinds of trouble. Put away anything breakable or valuable until he grows up. Cats love gravity experiments so give him things he can safely knock down instead.


No dangling toys or strings or elastics or rubber bands left about.
I've been doing food research for some time and still do. I want to go to raw diet as soon as possible, as I have the time to do it properly, working from home. I'm naturally worried about giving it any chemicals found in common food. I'm not saying that raw meat is completely clean in that respect (only home-grown animals are), but it's way more cleaner than some pet food that has chemicals in it to last decade on the store shelves.


The biting was a surprise - it's really strong and sharp, from such a small thing. I would even go as far as saying that it's painful, had to pull my finger out of his mouth...


I'm probably gonna lock it into a bedroom where I can close the door so Husky cannot access it and let it explore without fear of Husky interference.


Husky's getting better, but then again, it's been barely 24 hours, so it's gonna take some time for her to adjust too, as she's very jealous of him.


Good idea about the dangling toy reminder - strangling hazard, correct ?


Oh, and one more question - do they at this age understand the concept of height ? Would she attempt to jump down from the 5 foot drawer ? I'd love to leave it at that height with her bed on top of it, but after 5 minutes of watching here, it appeared she would try to jump, so I put her back in cage where she's safe ,but obviously doesn't like being locked up.


I recall Huskies had similar issues at that age - very limited walking during first 4 months to avoid hip injuries. At what age are cats safe to jump and fall from these heights ?
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenderFrost View Post
For some reason I keep getting mixed whether it's a he or she.


When I got my Husky, I had a 9-5 job, so Husky was alone during the day for fist year, which is when the separation anxiety built up. Combined with boredom, I had to exchange all furniture


I do, definitely want him to be safe and confident - but then again - aren't all cats like that anyway ? Can a cat even have a separation anxiety ? Aren't they just naturally too independent for that ?




Kneading, huh ? Now I know what that word means

No, cats are social animals that "independent" thing is a fallacy regarding most cats. And yes, cats can have separation anxiety.

You cannot make a kitten live in a cage, that is cruel. Kittens need to be able to run and jump and climb and play. Set up a safe room for when you can't be around. A room, not a cage.

Keep your dog on a house line to keep the kitten safe, and/or set up gates or screens in door ways. Never leave them alone together. Ensure there are elevated spaces in every room for the kitten to be higher than the dog can reach but don't rely on the kitten's ability to get away in time just yet, not for a long while in fact if ever, huskies have a strong prey drive


https://www.siberianhuskyvic.org.au/...preydrive.html

Last edited by catsmom21; 09-14-2019 at 06:03 PM..
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:31 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,832 posts, read 1,495,711 times
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I think because he's so tiny and seemingly fragile, that you keep thinking of him as a "she" because that's a stereotype for females. But pretty soon he will get so feisty you won't have any trouble! haha
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