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Old 10-27-2019, 08:16 AM
 
5,123 posts, read 989,975 times
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Here's the situation: I have a late-afternoon appointment in a nearby state on Friday, and I'd like to stay overnight there rather than make the long trip home in the dark (and possible rain, like today).

My kitten is 7 months old, and just last month she "graduated" to being left home alone for as many as 8 or 9 hours. But I've never left her overnight. (She's alone overnight in a sense since I shut her out of my bedroom - I hope to change that later but right now she's too rambunctious - but of course she knows I'm in the house.)

I would leave my house at 11 am Friday and be back by 11 am Satirday - so 24 hours. Could I just leave her a big bowl of water, a generous amount of wet food, and a bowl of dry as back-up?

(My appointment involves family responsibility. I really need to go.)
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Old 10-27-2019, 08:45 AM
 
6,359 posts, read 13,068,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
Here's the situation: I have a late-afternoon appointment in a nearby state on Friday, and I'd like to stay overnight there rather than make the long trip home in the dark (and possible rain, like today).

My kitten is 7 months old, and just last month she "graduated" to being left home alone for as many as 8 or 9 hours. But I've never left her overnight. (She's alone overnight in a sense since I shut her out of my bedroom - I hope to change that later but right now she's too rambunctious - but of course she knows I'm in the house.)

I would leave my house at 11 am Friday and be back by 11 am Satirday - so 24 hours. Could I just leave her a big bowl of water, a generous amount of wet food, and a bowl of dry as back-up?

(My appointment involves family responsibility. I really need to go.)

24 hours is a long time for a kitten to not be checked on. I would not do it, after one such experience. I always come home now, I can't stand to leave them more than 12 hours.

If you feel your safety would be at risk driving home late at night: I would kitten proof one room and put her in it, don't leave her full run of the house. You must be absolutely sure the room is proofed against danger and injury.

Nothing she can get hung up on, or caught in, (nothing dangling) nothing that could be knocked over or fall on her, nothing that could be broken and cause a cut, nothing she can eat that would injure her.

My experience (20 years ago): I thought my home was kitten proofed, I had two adult cats and a neutered male kitten about the same age as yours. I was gone 36 hours. When I got home I found my kitten lethargic and sick, and discovered he had somehow gotten into a cassette tape. He had eaten it and then vomited pieces of it all over the house in little piles, but was still in a very bad way. Thankfully he did not end up needing surgery, but I have never left them over night again.

I can also share other people's stories, regarding blinds, dangling toys, and unsteady furniture, but I will spare you the details.

The thing is, when their routines are disrupted, is when accidents happen. Disruption in routine causes stress and they (both kittens and adult cats) are more likely to get into trouble.

If at all possible, I would urge you to come home, board her, or ask someone she knows to come stay with her.

Last edited by catsmom21; 10-27-2019 at 08:56 AM..
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Old 10-27-2019, 08:46 AM
 
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Have a pet sitter come by if you have no friends who could do so.
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Old 10-27-2019, 08:57 AM
 
6,359 posts, read 13,068,665 times
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And at least two litter boxes, and keep them shallow. Several shallow bowls of water.
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Old 10-27-2019, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Florida
215 posts, read 40,131 times
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Would also get a pet sitter around dinner time who cleans litter box and provides fresh food. He/she can then also make sure your kitten is ok. Better safe and more careful than sorry later, I think.
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Old 10-27-2019, 09:44 AM
 
5,123 posts, read 989,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post
24 hours is a long time for a kitten to not be checked on. I would not do it, after one such experience. I always come home now, I can't stand to leave them more than 12 hours.

If you feel your safety would be at risk driving home late at night: I would kitten proof one room and put her in it, don't leave her full run of the house. You must be absolutely sure the room is proofed against danger and injury.

Nothing she can get hung up on, or caught in, (nothing dangling) nothing that could be knocked over or fall on her, nothing that could be broken and cause a cut, nothing she can eat that would injure her.

My experience (20 years ago): I thought my home was kitten proofed, I had two adult cats and a neutered male kitten about the same age as yours. I was gone 36 hours. When I got home I found my kitten lethargic and sick, and discovered he had somehow gotten into a cassette tape. He had eaten it and then vomited pieces of it all over the house in little piles, but was still in a very bad way. Thankfully he did not end up needing surgery, but I have never left them over night again.

I can also share other people's stories, regarding blinds, dangling toys, and unsteady furniture, but I will spare you the details.

The thing is, when their routines are disrupted, is when accidents happen. Disruption in routine causes stress and they (both kittens and adult cats) are more likely to get into trouble.

If at all possible, I would urge you to come home, board her, or ask someone she knows to come stay with her.
Oh my goodness. What an awful experience with your kitten. Thank G-d he turned out OK. (And I have heard stories about the blinds. I have the cords for mine all wrapped up high, out of kitty reach.)

OK, I've thought about it - and read the other posters' remarks, too, and thank you - and I've decided that I will drop her off at the vet Froday morning and pick her up Saturday morning. It's not ideal, since she will,be scared, but at least she will be safe. (And I will be safe, too, not having to make the long drive home in the dark. I have challenges with night vision,)

Thanks again to you and the other posters for your input.
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Old 10-27-2019, 09:47 AM
Status: "Now home, warm and cozy." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Spurs country. "Go, Spurs, Go!"
3,562 posts, read 4,126,868 times
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Great decision, it will be worth it for peace of mind. I do pet sitting for dogs, and cat caring for cats, as they don't need me to move in the house with them as I do with dogs. I will not leave them (dogs) for any length of time, or travel too far away when sitting. My thought is if something happened to me then they'd be home alone and nobody would know. So I always have an informational note in my wallet regarding this.

My point here is if something happened to you on your trip your kitten would be left home alone. I like that you will be boarding her. You WILL have peace of mind, and that is priceless.
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Old 10-27-2019, 01:46 PM
 
6,359 posts, read 13,068,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
Oh my goodness. What an awful experience with your kitten. Thank G-d he turned out OK. (And I have heard stories about the blinds. I have the cords for mine all wrapped up high, out of kitty reach.)

OK, I've thought about it - and read the other posters' remarks, too, and thank you - and I've decided that I will drop her off at the vet Froday morning and pick her up Saturday morning. It's not ideal, since she will,be scared, but at least she will be safe. (And I will be safe, too, not having to make the long drive home in the dark. I have challenges with night vision,)

Thanks again to you and the other posters for your input.

I think you are doing the right thing. Incidentally, it's not just the cords from blinds that are dangerous, but the blinds themselves, especially if they are the horizontal kind. Cats cat get caught and injured in the slats, or the strings that hold the blinds together.

I really dislike blinds.

Last edited by catsmom21; 10-27-2019 at 02:41 PM..
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:37 PM
 
Location: southern kansas
8,690 posts, read 6,133,675 times
Reputation: 19723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
Oh my goodness. What an awful experience with your kitten. Thank G-d he turned out OK. (And I have heard stories about the blinds. I have the cords for mine all wrapped up high, out of kitty reach.)

OK, I've thought about it - and read the other posters' remarks, too, and thank you - and I've decided that I will drop her off at the vet Froday morning and pick her up Saturday morning. It's not ideal, since she will,be scared, but at least she will be safe. (And I will be safe, too, not having to make the long drive home in the dark. I have challenges with night vision,)

Thanks again to you and the other posters for your input.
I think you're making the right choice. In different circumstances I might say ok to leave her alone overnight. But you're talking a trip out of town, and you have to think worse-case scenario (mechanical problems, accident, etc.) that could delay your return. The best way to cover all your bases is to have her under someone's care (pet sitter or boarding) in case you don't make it back as planned. Vet boarding isn't ideal, but at least you know she's being cared for.
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Old 10-27-2019, 03:54 PM
 
5,123 posts, read 989,975 times
Reputation: 3595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar 77 View Post
Great decision, it will be worth it for peace of mind. I do pet sitting for dogs, and cat caring for cats, as they don't need me to move in the house with them as I do with dogs. I will not leave them (dogs) for any length of time, or travel too far away when sitting. My thought is if something happened to me then they'd be home alone and nobody would know. So I always have an informational note in my wallet regarding this.

My point here is if something happened to you on your trip your kitten would be left home alone. I like that you will be boarding her. You WILL have peace of mind, and that is priceless.
Absolutely.....and thanks. This way I can focus on my family issue and not worry about what's happening with my kitty, or dreading the drive home the same evening.
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