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Old 08-18-2008, 12:23 PM
 
662 posts, read 5,147,670 times
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We have a five-month old kitten, who is great, except for one problem: he annoys our older cat (four years old) very frequently with aggressive play behavior. What he does is when the older cat is resting or doing something else, he will run up to her, wrap his paws around her neck and try to start a play fight, and he starts trying to wrestle her.

She hates this and hisses and shrieks when he does this, and she also slaps him. But he is not getting the message.

This has been going on for a month now (we've had him almost two months) but it's getting worse. It happens several times an hour, and it bothers me to hear all the shrieking from the older cat. The worst part is that it's very much impeding their relationship. The older cat accepts him, but gets mad when he tries to do this. The kitten just wants to play, but he's very rough and has actually rubbed the fur entirely off her neck where he grabs her. She is now avoiding him, which is sad. They get along but are not friends at all, and it's sad because our other cat (who died a few months ago) and our older cat were best friends who cuddled and groomed all the time.

If the kitten keeps doing this, I fear their relationship will be irreperably harmed and they will never be friends. I know kittens are very playful but this kitten is not getting the message about when it's okay to engage in aggressive play (like when they're already playing and chasing) and when it's not okay (like when the other cat is resting).

What can I do? Whenever I see him about to do it I reprimand him, but he's not getting the picture. I could spray him with water, but I don't want the other cat to think she's doing something wrong.
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Old 08-18-2008, 12:46 PM
 
697 posts, read 2,388,097 times
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Can you open your heart and home to adopt another kitten playmate for the little rascal?
That would probably do the trick.
We have two Torties one is the mom and the other is the baby, although both are older than 11 now yet the baby still drives the mom crazy with kitten-like antics especially stalking her outside the bathroom door when she's done using the litter box. Mom has tried many times to get daughter to back off but daughter has not learned.
I wish we had adopted another of her litter mates when they were born and believe that would have worked great to give her some peace. Now it would just be another annoyance for poor old Mom cat.
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Old 08-18-2008, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
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My new kitten is doing the same thing to my 2yr old. Wish I could adopt another but to expensive. Advice please.
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Old 08-18-2008, 02:13 PM
 
Location: California
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The kittens are only doing what kittens do. And other than re-directing them with somekind of interactive toy, there isn't much one can do. You can't very well punish a kitten for playing....which is exactly what they are doing. Eventually, the kitten will grow out of the "attack" mode. In the meantime...the older cats may have to take a stand and put the younger ones in their place. I have one, that will just put up with it and run under a bed...another who takes it and takes it and then WHAM swats the kitten and down and shows them who the alpha cat really is. Of couse, the kitten will usually stop for maybe 10 min. and then it's back to "playing" again.
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Old 08-18-2008, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
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Thanks Shelbygirl1, Scarlett won't give up for ten minutes maybe3 max. Jake is just going to have to show her who is boss. I just don't want her to get hurt.
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Old 08-18-2008, 02:26 PM
 
Location: California
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Older cats are usually pretty good with kittens. They instinctively know not to be too rough with them. But sometimes, the kitten needs to learn who is boss! When you can, try to re-direct Scarletts attention to another toy or wand or something. Not sure how old she is ...but a laser light (or even a flashlight) is a great way to tire a kitten out! I only mention age, because sometimes the younger ones don't react to the lights as an older kitten would.
It's amazing what cats will put up with from a kitten. But as the kitten gets older, they dynamics seem to change and they are less and less patient with them. My little one doesn't get away with half of what she use too!
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Old 08-18-2008, 02:30 PM
 
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I'm going through this too. I adopted a kitten last Dec. and he loves to play rough. My tortie (the next youngest) is young enough that she will play with him, and she even starts it sometimes. She squeals like crazy too (she's a princess) but instead of running and hiding, she eggs him on even more! My two older cats hate my kitten's aggressive play, and for the most part he's learned to leave them alone. He's 11 months old.

It is good that your cat does not just sit back and take it, and attempts to fight back a little. This may discourage him. The good news is he WILL grow out of it, but it may take a few years. I don't know of any way to stop it.
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Old 08-18-2008, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
378 posts, read 1,326,195 times
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Scarlett is 12 wks. I adopted her when she was 5 wks. Someone had dumped her in my vets parking lot. I had lost my Schatzi in Sept. and they knew I was ready for another child. She is really purrrrfect. Thanks everyone.

Theresa
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Old 08-18-2008, 08:05 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,041 posts, read 22,775,493 times
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As you mentioned, spraying with water might do the trick.

Get a clean, new bottle so that it doesn't have the residue of some chemical in it. Set it on stream, not spray. And aim right at the little guy. The bottles can be very accurate. You may be surprised how good you get at spraying him, not her.

Also, you could squirt at him when he is no longer right on her. But be sure to do it immediately after the behavior you want to correct has occured. Accompany it with words in a correcting tone of voice to him to show him you mean business.

And, balance that with sweet reassuring words and petting to the cat being attacked.

Like someone said, even though it may sound like going out of the frying pan into the fire, getting a playmate for him might help if squirts don't.

Good luck!
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Old 08-19-2008, 06:02 AM
 
Location: California
10,091 posts, read 35,789,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
As you mentioned, spraying with water might do the trick.

Get a clean, new bottle so that it doesn't have the residue of some chemical in it. Set it on stream, not spray. And aim right at the little guy. The bottles can be very accurate. You may be surprised how good you get at spraying him, not her.

Also, you could squirt at him when he is no longer right on her. But be sure to do it immediately after the behavior you want to correct has occured. Accompany it with words in a correcting tone of voice to him to show him you mean business.

And, balance that with sweet reassuring words and petting to the cat being attacked.

Like someone said, even though it may sound like going out of the frying pan into the fire, getting a playmate for him might help if squirts don't.

Good luck!
Sorry....I disagree! Spraying a 12 week old kitten for playing is totally wrong!
Spray bottles work for older kittens/cat who are kneading on furniture...not playing! Start spraying this kitten now and your going to have a kitten that is terrified of you and make him skittish throughout his lifetime.

Last edited by ShelbyGirl1; 08-19-2008 at 06:20 AM..
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