U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Cats
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 04-15-2012, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Vancouver BC
2 posts, read 2,685 times
Reputation: 13

Advertisements

My cat had a blockage a week ago due to kidney stones. Since then, hes been in and out of the vet and unable to pee on his own. The only way to empty his bladder is to catherize him. He's taking many medications but today the vet suggested he might need the P.U. surgery and knows an excellent surgeon. She was hoping it won't come to that but its not looking good since he's unable to pee. I can't keep dragging him to the vet every day to express his bladder, either.
I just want to know what I'm up against and/or what to expect. I've gone over a few pages of this forum about it and I do feel better knowing there seems to be a good success rate. The vet is optimistic as well that he'll make a full recovery.
Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-23-2012, 07:10 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,784 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by GetWellSoonLucky! View Post
I wanted to share this information for those of you are considering the surgery and have not gone through with it yet. My 5 year old cat, Lucky, had the PU surgery about two months ago. When we took him to have the stitches out two weeks later, our vet (who is considered to be by far one of the best doctors in the Austin area) told us Lucky had healed up really well and the surgery has been successful. He ended up getting a pretty bad bladder infection, but that is beside the point.

Six weeks after surgery Lucky had developed so much scar tissue from the surgery that his new urethra was closing up. His bladder was full, and he could only get a few drops of urine out at a time. He was in a lot of discomfort. There was nothing they could do for him, and he had to be put to sleep, otherwise his bladder would have eventually ruptured. I know this surgery has been really successful for many of the cat parents who post on this site, but I guess my cat, ironically named Lucky, was in the unlucky 10% of cats who the surgery can't work for.

We were never told of the possibility of this complication prior to agreeing to the surgery. After the surgery, we followed his post-care instructions obsessively, never taking his cone collar off, keeping him confined in a 8x8 foot cage my husband built in the living room so he couldn't run or jump and put strain on the stitches, applying his medication, everything. If I could have predicted the future, obviously I would have just drastically changed his diet and continued rushing him to the vet to get unblocked every time it happened rather than having the surgery.

Lucky brought an imaginable amount of joy to my life, and I would have never thought I would lose him at such a young age to a condition that I had no control over.

Again, I know this surgery works for most cats, but it's important to remember that it doesn't work for all cats, and for some, the complications are fatal.
Sorry for your great loss - I know exactly how you feel as our cat Gizmo had to be put to sleep on Saturday 21st April with the same scar tissue problem as Lucky also at approx 6 weeks after the operation.

It has been the hardest time of my life watching him go through the initial pain of being blocked in the first place only for him to block again within a few days. Then going though the P.U procedure and coming out of the long recovery period where we really thought the worst was behind him/us.
He'd been doing so well then suddenly seemed to struggle with urinating on Friday morning, then by the time I came home after work and greeted him with his usual cuddle he yelped as I picked him up, his bladder felt full so I took him to his litter tray where he tried and tried but couldn't pass anything so I rushed him to the vets. He stayed in overnight so I called first thing Saturday morning and they'd managed to empty his bladder but then dropped the bombshell that he'd almost healed too well and that his new urethra was closing up and that the only option was to put him to sleep.
My fiancee and I picked him up and brought him home for a couple of hours to say our goodbyes and he was gone by 12 noon - we are devastated as we really felt that the P.U had given him a new life and with the fact he wasn't even 2 years old we'd imagined having him with us for some time! He was already the most affectionate cat I've ever know but after the operation he was even more attentive, he loved every minute we spent with him and we will miss him so much.

I just wanted to share the joy that Gizmo brought to our lives and also to remind people not to get their hopes up too high, this is a very complex operation not without its complications! I found this forum while we were considering the P.U and it made me feel reassured that we were not the only ones going through this and that there was a great chance of a happy and full life for Gizzy at the end of it.

Given the choice I would do it all over again because the extra time we had with him from when the first problem occurred was well worth it.

R.I.P Gizmo we miss you so much
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2012, 07:59 AM
 
4,308 posts, read 4,955,513 times
Reputation: 5058
I'm so sorry for your loss of your beloved Gizmo. What were you feeding him? This is so important, is why I ask.

Starting a cat from day one with an all canned (NO FISH) diet may help prevent these tragedies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2012, 03:30 PM
 
2 posts, read 2,784 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsmom21 View Post
I'm so sorry for your loss of your beloved Gizmo. What were you feeding him? This is so important, is why I ask.

Starting a cat from day one with an all canned (NO FISH) diet may help prevent these tragedies.
Thanks for your kind words

We were feeding him dry food with plenty of water, it was only when he first blocked up that we became aware of this potential crystal formation problem and the fact that male cats have a very narrow urethra. From then we fed him wet and dry urinary S/O food.

I know a lot of people that have fed their cats only on dry food that have lived full lives (15+ yrs) without any problems in that area so not entirely sure about the wet v's dry food thing and don't wish to start on that now to be honest as we are still grieving the loss of our boy too much.

I feel that there is a definite lack of education with regards to this problem as I and the other cat owners I have since spoken to have never heard of this blocking problem! Maybe they have just been lucky or we were particularly unlucky??

In summary I feel that if we were to get another male cat in the future I would make sure I did everything possible to help prevent this happening again so will be doing some research into which things have actually been proven to help prevent the crystal build up.

I have to say this thread has been a fantastic help with us getting through what happened to Gizmo and what to expect from the P.U operation although in this instance there was no happy ending. Its just sad to think that most people will only find this when the problem has already got to a stage where surgery is required as I did......I feel I/we should be helping to prevent other cats from getting to this state but don't know exactly how to do it?
Anyone got any comment on this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2012, 04:58 PM
 
380 posts, read 94,106 times
Reputation: 711
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane Warren View Post
Thanks for your kind words

so not entirely sure about the wet v's dry food thing and don't wish to start on that now to be honest as we are still grieving the loss of our boy too much.

I feel that there is a definite lack of education with regards to this problem would make sure I did everything possible to help prevent this happening again so will be doing some research into which things have actually been proven to help prevent the crystal build up.

.I feel I/we should be helping to prevent other cats from getting to this state but don't know exactly how to do it?
Anyone got any comment on this
?
Catsmom 21 is correct. For further verification, feline specialist Dr. Lisa Pierson Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health.

Also Dr Jean Hofve http://www.littlebigcat.com/category/nutrition/ ;

Dr Elizabeth Hodgkins Diabetic Cat Care ;
Many feline Experts-Veterinarians contribute here: www.fnes.org .
Plenty more beneficial info available as more and more veterinarians are getting out of the grasp of the Pet food companies which very generously fund all the universities, etc. http://www.petmd.com/blogs/fullyvett...n#.T5XWoO0qNym
Best wishes.

Last edited by Pamina333; 04-23-2012 at 05:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2012, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Denmark
1 posts, read 1,336 times
Reputation: 10
Nice to find this very long tread about FLUDT and perineal urethrostomy. Forgive me for possible mistakes in language, english is not my first language.

I have a 5 year old male neuter (maine coon). He's currently hospitalized at the vet, because of his third blockage. In may/june 2010 he broke his hip and had surgery removing the hip (the ball of the femur). In august 2010 he completely blocked his urinary tract over a short time. He almost died, and was very ill. Luckily he came through and everything was well until the end of May 2011. There he again blocked. This time not completely and we rushed to the vet. The consequences were much less severe and he was on very quickly on top.
This cat has been feed with a lot of canned food with extra water from before this even began.
Now in april 2012 he blocked completely again. This time there were only very few crystals (struvite) and as in 2011 the pH was on 7. But it seemed to the veterinary, when he placed the catheter, that there were only a very narrow passage where the urinary tract is at it's narrowest. So he talked about the possibility of a perineal urethrostomy if this continues. But also said that this wasn't a risk free operation and some cats had sequelae after the surgery.


Has anybody here negative experience with perineal urethrostomy? I haven't yet read the tread thoroughly from start to finish, but haven't found any claiming it to be other than a succes for their cat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2012, 04:08 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,305 times
Reputation: 10
i perform this surgery in Turkey very succesfully all the best for all the cats who suffer from FUS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2012, 12:44 PM
 
48 posts, read 29,749 times
Reputation: 91
I've browsed this forum before but this thread is the one that got me to register and post. I read through this entire thread the night before we met with the vet to discuss this operation for our kitty.

I read about the surgery but I wanted to read first hand stories rather than veterinary terms and this thread gave me a lot of insight, the good, the bad and the ugly.

Our cat had been blocked for about a month. He had to be catheterized when he got the first blockage and nothing worked, he just kept getting blocked and sick so the vet felt that the operation was necessary, otherwise he'd just keep being in pain and miserable.

I was scared about the risks and complications but I didn't want him to suffer any more so we ok'd the surgery and he had it done last Friday. We were able to pick him up the next morning and I must say he looked a lot better than I expected.

If there was one thing I learned from reading this thread as well as other sites is that wet food is the way to go so I've been feeding him only wet food since he's been home and he loves it. Sometimes I have to water the food down a bit if I feel that he isn't drinking enough on his own but for the most part he is eating well, drinking, and using his box without too much effort or pain.

He is happy and active and actually seems much happier after the operation than he was during the entire month he was suffering from these blockages. He is wearing a cone and gets two different kinds of medications a day and I clean his stitches a few times a day. He had his first checkup yesterday and the vet said that he was doing well and goes back for another checkup this Friday.

I'm happy with the results so far and glad we made the decision to go ahead with the surgery.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2012, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Vancouver BC
2 posts, read 2,685 times
Reputation: 13
Evie,
Glad to hear your boy is doing well.

Mine ended up having the PU and it was the best thing we could do for him. The surgery went very well and the surgeon was pleased with the results. During the operation, he found a urethral stone that had been causing Smokey to be blocked. We had it analyzed and it was a calcium oxalate stone. He's been on the wet urinary SO and gets a bit of the dry urinary SO twice a day and he loves it.

The only complication after was that he still had a bit of a bladder infection from before, so he was given an antibiotic shot that would last 2-3 weeks and I gave him some pain relief meds twice a day for about a week. He seems to be doing fine now and gets his stitches out tomorrow
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2012, 02:25 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,211 times
Reputation: 13
My boy Indiana Jones has had urinary problems since age 3. He was blocked at age 4 but since that time, continued to experience urinary infections often, sometimes as often as every 6 to 12 months. Stress seemed to bring about his worst events. Just a month ago, when my hurricane shutters and impact resistant glass was installed on my home, all of which was VERY noisy and caused my feline babies a great deal of stress, he became blocked. It was after hours so I rushed him to the Vet ER clinic, he was catheterized, kept for 2 days until he could urinate on his own, came home and re-blocked. Long story, the ER vet recommended the PU surgery.

I prefer to treat conservatively and not jump to surgery, so I consulted his regular vet, a holistic vet and a board certified vet surgeon, who all concurred, after reading his medical history that the PU surgery was his best option, most especially because we couldn't keep him unblocked.

The board certified vet did the surgery on a Wednesday, released him to me home on Friday with instructions to keep him confined to a bathroom with litter box, water system, and plenty of towels on the floor because he was leaking urine. He also wore a lovely Elizabethan collar, but he is so sweet that he didn’t fight the collar. I spent a lot of time visiting and talking with him in the bathroom so we wouldn’t feel too lonely. Luckily, his leaking stopped on Saturday, but he seemed dopey, probably from the pain meds, so I kept him separated from his siblings. I’d remove the collar only when he ate (special canned food only), allow him a few minutes to wash his face, and would replace the collar. I also used an old and damp washcloth to wash his face, down his back and legs, just not on his new surgical site. He really seemed to enjoy the washing. Sunday I allowed him to walk the house while I followed. He was so happy to be free for a time. At night and while I worked during the day I continued to keep him separated in the bathroom, but would allow him to mingle freely in the evenings with his siblings. Unfortunately for him, his siblings ostracized him while he wore the e-collar. Two weeks after the surgery we returned to the vet surgeon for suture removal. I was told I could remove the collar for supervised cleanings, but couldn’t allow him to “have at it” because he could still damage that delicate skin, which would/could cause stricture, and the that the resulting scar tissue WOULD NECESSITATE additional surgery. I needed to protect Indy from his nature, which was to clean his body. One week post-suture removal, I still saw bright fresh blood after he’d wash his bottom. I decided to replace the collar for a few more days until no new blood appeared when he could clean himself. It’s been 4 days without the collar, his bottom has healed, and he doesn’t seem overly curious about what happened down there.

I decided to write Indiana’s story after doing so much research on the PU surgery and finding this link. I read the entire link and learned something from every post. I must thank TracySam for the logical, reassuring and confident words of encouragement. While Indy may again get struvite stones, I pray that he can easily pass them with his new plumbing. Thanks again to all who wrote with their stories. It was definitely scary before Indy had the surgery, but I’m confident that it was the best solution for him.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Cats

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top