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Old 03-20-2014, 07:11 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,374 posts, read 11,282,946 times
Reputation: 4210

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With many apps I have been *looking at*,
(click on [Install] and then read all the *permissions* it is asking for),
I noted that a lot of them, were asking for permissions that *I* think are totally irrelevant,
for the app to work.

In many cases the App wants to have permission to know all about my *social* stuff,
like contacts and call usages !

Example:
I am looking for a very simple *Flight Log Book*.
(I am a recreational Private Pilot).
For some reason, many of them want to have permission to my contacts list ??

I have not been able to figure out why a *flight log book* needs to know who my contacts are !?

Is this why *privacy* is going out the door ?

Any opinions out there ?

Last but not least, how many people just *accept* the request(s),
and then just install the app ?
It is really NOT *Small Print* anymore !
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Old 03-20-2014, 07:51 PM
 
Location: northwest Illinois
2,331 posts, read 2,690,159 times
Reputation: 2433
I'm probably gonna be flamed for this, but I don't suggest using apps on a smartphone to begin with because many of them can't be trusted.
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Old 03-20-2014, 07:55 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 41,309,068 times
Reputation: 62136
I just don't give permission for location services, I don't have an address book and I don't have contacts listed on my phone so no big deal there for me.
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Old 03-20-2014, 07:58 PM
 
Location: 92037
4,631 posts, read 9,006,893 times
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Its amazing how well the general public has embraced/ignored the T&Cs before downloading apps. Some might contact the developer as to why they need that data for something that seems totally off base. But for all intents and purposes the more data that is given, the more that could potentially be sold or used for perhaps another app idea.

The whole 'free' thing has been this way since it was popular. Gathering data. MOst of it is generally harmless as its analytics that is valuable more more than anything else (eg. users habits and how that correlates to marketing stuff.) Granted some apps actually do provide more useful stuff than others. Some are just terrible and really dont provide much of anything but sure would love to know your habits.

I dont think there is anything wrong it. I just think how its presented is a bit brash and submissive, causing reason for skepticism.

But we are way down this road already and no turning back now. Its going to get much much more specific once this is implemented and launched. Look for this integrated technology to be in the consumer mass markets within the next 7-10 years.

Context Awareness | Geofencing Technology | Gimbal | Qualcomm
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Old 03-21-2014, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,825 posts, read 13,968,972 times
Reputation: 8068
No, what's amazing is how suspicious we are. Although I wouldn't say it's a bad thing.
Did you email the developer and ask why that permission is there?
Many times there are very valid reasons for that permission that people just don't recognize.
For example, can you email your log directly from the app? THAT'S why it needs access to your contacts.

Yes, there are many times that permissions are over the top, but frankly many many times they are there for a valid reason that folks don't realize.

When Spotify or one of those music apps came out... Pandora maybe? There was some backlash about the permissions but it was clearly there so that people could share playlists.
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Old 03-21-2014, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Southern California
12,434 posts, read 10,907,326 times
Reputation: 34152
It's the price you pay to be using the latest technology. If you don't like it, don't install or don't have a smart phone.
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Old 03-21-2014, 11:20 AM
 
Location: 92037
4,631 posts, read 9,006,893 times
Reputation: 1946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
No, what's amazing is how suspicious we are. Although I wouldn't say it's a bad thing.
Did you email the developer and ask why that permission is there?
Many times there are very valid reasons for that permission that people just don't recognize.
For example, can you email your log directly from the app? THAT'S why it needs access to your contacts.

Yes, there are many times that permissions are over the top, but frankly many many times they are there for a valid reason that folks don't realize.

When Spotify or one of those music apps came out... Pandora maybe? There was some backlash about the permissions but it was clearly there so that people could share playlists.
Yes this is correct ^^

For the majority of apps this HAS been the trend and will always be that way especially for smaller developers looking to just make a useful or non-useful app (isolated and feature based within the device like a utility or game)
But this is changing for some of the social network integration level apps/services that require Facebook, email or G+ log ins to use.

Apps at the social network level are terrific, when they are done right and a useful service is provided.

As far as backlash? Usually tech blogs or early adopters care about that stuff. The typical app user that got word from a friend about some cool app they can do something with will care 0 about the permissions or T&Cs. A minority voice vs thousands if not millions of downloads across the globe is proof that no one cares. Same happened with Facebook when they decided to flip the switch on GPS tracking and ability to actually delete a profile. Small uproad, some minor adjustments made, but really not deep changes. Just a quick cover.

Generally speaking free social network related apps, want your data. Not only to provide a better finely tuned product, but to be able to potentially sell those anonymous metrics to parties willing to pay for it. So its not so much on the front end of what the app wants to access, its what the company does with it on the back end.

Again these are exceptions, not the general rule. 99.9% of app users should care less about the T&Cs, but for the more curious minded, doesnt hurt at all to understand why certain functions of the device are required to be used, besides what would otherwise appear to be pedestrian in nature.

Healthy skepticism is ok, paranoia about privacy is another. If you are on city-data, the web, an email etc you on the grid. Trying to 'think' having less attachments to a network = some degree of anonymity is just satisfying yourself to think you are not on otherwise.

Nobody really cares what you do as as the person you are, they just care about what people like you do, so they can sell you stuff
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:18 PM
 
1,009 posts, read 1,562,198 times
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Certain features of the app may only need very small parts of a group of permissions but they have to request the entire group. Email the dev and ask them. I guarantee you they will let you know how constricted permissions sets are and how it's hard to work around them.

I've heard google's going to start segmenting them more in later versions of their API but I'll wait and see it before I start praising it.
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:14 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,974,381 times
Reputation: 12847
Quote:
Originally Posted by adyn View Post
Certain features of the app may only need very small parts of a group of permissions but they have to request the entire group. Email the dev and ask them. I guarantee you they will let you know how constricted permissions sets are and how it's hard to work around them.

I've heard google's going to start segmenting them more in later versions of their API but I'll wait and see it before I start praising it.
This.

Also, with Android, you can easily see everything an app is doing by going into developer mode. Google apps are not hidden like iPhone apps. If any popular app does anything suspicious, it will be called out immediately.
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Old 03-22-2014, 02:08 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,386 posts, read 21,067,327 times
Reputation: 23902
Default Why are your upset?

Google makes money by selling data about you to advertisers.
This is their business model.
It accounts for 100% of their profits and enables them to play around with glasses and cars.

Google controls Android.
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