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Old 02-09-2015, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
14,120 posts, read 21,867,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skugelstadt View Post
I've read repeatedly about people upgrading the iphone4 to iOS 7, having problems. Processor apparently not up to the task. Earlier iphone 3's, same issue upgrading the software
It works great on both of our iPhone 4 phones. iOS 7 was never a problem for me. Sure, there were bugs, but they were fixed fairly quickly.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:02 PM
i7pXFLbhE3gq
 
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There's also the question of is it better to have a new OS that hurts performance a bit, which you can choose not to install, or is it better to have a phone that never runs an up to date OS and maybe gets one or two updates if you're lucky?

Obviously older hardware is going to have trouble keeping up with the latest software, but having the choice to run it or not seems much better than being stuck with a device that ships outdated and is abandoned quickly.
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Old 02-11-2015, 09:28 PM
 
24,497 posts, read 37,682,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonF View Post
There's also the question of is it better to have a new OS that hurts performance a bit, which you can choose not to install, or is it better to have a phone that never runs an up to date OS and maybe gets one or two updates if you're lucky?

Obviously older hardware is going to have trouble keeping up with the latest software, but having the choice to run it or not seems much better than being stuck with a device that ships outdated and is abandoned quickly.
I don't agree with your statement about old hardware obviously not being able to keep up with new software. While that has traditionally been true for iOS, as of late, it's been the complete opposite for windows and android. Most notably are android 2.3 (froyo) and android 5.0 (lollipop) which had significant performance gains on older hardware (both due to better compiling). Android 5.0 even brought longer battery life for older phones (more aggressive use of CPU ht mode) and thousands of new application programming interfaces.

It really depends on what the update entails.
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Old 02-12-2015, 05:58 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
6,062 posts, read 3,181,011 times
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I still use a galaxy s-2 (2011 I think). I bought a battery 2 years ago from amazon which cost about 10 bucks.
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Old 02-12-2015, 06:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I don't agree with your statement about old hardware obviously not being able to keep up with new software. While that has traditionally been true for iOS, as of late, it's been the complete opposite for windows and android. Most notably are android 2.3 (froyo) and android 5.0 (lollipop) which had significant performance gains on older hardware (both due to better compiling). Android 5.0 even brought longer battery life for older phones (more aggressive use of CPU ht mode) and thousands of new application programming interfaces.

It really depends on what the update entails.
Sorry, I should have been more specific. Releases that are focused on bringing new features as opposed to fixing bugs and performance issues resulting from terrible design decisions that never should've made it into a shipping product.

But even iOS updates are not universal slowdowns. Even old devices can benefit from a better javascript engine, for example. And point releases generally give back much of the performance that was lost in the GM (8.1.1 shaved a full 2 seconds off the time needed to reload the New York Times web site vs 8.1, for example).
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Old 02-12-2015, 11:19 PM
 
24,497 posts, read 37,682,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonF View Post
Sorry, I should have been more specific. Releases that are focused on bringing new features as opposed to fixing bugs and performance issues resulting from terrible design decisions that never should've made it into a shipping product.

But even iOS updates are not universal slowdowns. Even old devices can benefit from a better javascript engine, for example. And point releases generally give back much of the performance that was lost in the GM (8.1.1 shaved a full 2 seconds off the time needed to reload the New York Times web site vs 8.1, for example).
If you actually read my post, or understood compilers, you would know that I wasn't talking about terrible design decisions. I was actually discussing two specific releases of Android (2.3 and 5.0) which had performance benefits from new technologies. The same kind of new technologies that Apple's PC line has benefited from in the OSX.

JavaScript is really an outlier when it comes to discussing performance improvements. Again, it's not terrible design decisions, bugs, or performance issues that have resulted in JavaScript becoming faster. It's the fact that JavaScript is the only common prototypal inheritance language and in the last several decades of object oriented programming, 99.999% of r&d has been put into classical object oriented languages. The technology to squeeze performance out of JavaScript just didn't exist until ECMAScript 5. It is impressive how fast Google's v8 engine has gotten... so fast that it's used as the backend for many popular websites including the New York Times and Facebook.

Anyways, I think my point was clear in my previous post. I don't agree with your statement about old hardware obviously not being able to keep up with new software. Based on your own post, it seems like you don't even agree with yourself. Ironic, I must say.
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