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Old 11-27-2019, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
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We have an Unlimited calling plan with Verizon, with 4 lines.

Today Verizon hit my phone with an encouragement to turn on WiFi calling. My first instinct is to wonder what's in it for them (I suppose it takes load off their towers), and how will it be worse for me down the road.

Does anyone use WiFi calling? Do you prefer it over cell tower calling? Yes, we have WiFi at home and I have it at work. What are the pros and cons?
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Old 11-27-2019, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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WiFi is just an alternate radio path between your phone and cell towers. All radio paths have the possibility for a clearer signal, or not, depending on traffic density, broadcast strength, interference and structures between you and the transmitter.

As the Verizon FAQ pages say, this DOES consume data, so check your plan.
If you're at home and someone streams a movie or plays a complex on-line game, your WiFi might be too crowded.

I just checked with My Verizon and my phone (an older Samsung) does NOT have this capability. So before you spend too much time, log in there yourself and check your hardware capabilities.
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Old 11-27-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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I am sure that WiFi calling uses data, but not cellular data as long as the Wifi data stream remains uninterrupted.

That might disconnect the call and use cellular data, it would not be an instant handover.
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Old 11-27-2019, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
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OK based on these replies I see no reason to enable WiFi calling on my phone.

So, how soon before phones default to the WiFi call setting, and how soon after that are we unable to opt out of WiFi calling? Just rhetorical questions.
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Old 11-27-2019, 12:53 PM
 
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Based on what I'm reading it uses your wifi or any wifi you can connect to. About ten years ago my parents had an extender which was basically mini cell phone tower in your house that communicated calls over your internet connection. This is just skipping the extender and connecting directly to the routers wifi.


The benefit is you can use your phone with poor or no cell signal if wifi is available. Charging for data doesn't seem appropriate at least fully. If your internet provider is Comcast that data is initially flowing across Comcast's network.
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Old 11-27-2019, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
OK based on these replies I see no reason to enable WiFi calling on my phone.

So, how soon before phones default to the WiFi call setting, and how soon after that are we unable to opt out of WiFi calling? Just rhetorical questions.
I have used WiFi calling at a friends house where there is no cell service and at home, when our local tower had an issue. Nothing to be afraid of. I don’t turn it on unless needed. Like at a location where Verizon doesn’t work, but they have satellite internet. I travel to wild areas. And for some, it could be handy in a foreign country. Call quality is as good as your phone.

But if were you, set up WiFi calling (yes setup needs to be done)so when you need it you will be good to go.
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Old 11-27-2019, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Wandering.
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As others have said, setting up WiFi calling is about giving you more options for places where your phone will work, and not about anything nefarious on the part of the carrier.


My wife uses it on her T-Mobile phone in places where we have a better Verizon or AT&T signal, by using our Verizon or AT&T based WiFi. Basically allowing her to route her calls over whatever carrier is working best where we are (we travel a lot).



When she has a good T-Mobile signal, she doesn't use it.

Last edited by Skunk Workz; 11-27-2019 at 03:33 PM..
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Old 11-27-2019, 03:03 PM
 
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Wifi calling simply gives you better reception. It also takes the load off of cell towers. It's a win/win most of the time.
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Old 11-27-2019, 03:04 PM
 
229 posts, read 46,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_RDNC View Post
WiFi is just an alternate radio path between your phone and cell towers. All radio paths have the possibility for a clearer signal, or not, depending on traffic density, broadcast strength, interference and structures between you and the transmitter.
This is a bit of a misconception. WiFi calling will actually skip the cell towers altogether. Not route your calls to the cell tower via a different path.
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Old 11-27-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
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In general:

Cellular network: phone --> cell tower --> carrier network
Wifi Calling: phone--->wifi network--->internet--->carrier network
VoIP: phone --->local network--->Internet--->VoIP provider

The key is basically how your call gets the mobile, POTS, or VoIP provider.

Wifi calling provides more options to connect your call. This can be beneficial if you are in a location where the cell service may be spotty (basement of a building, etc.) but the wifi network is available. To the provider - it's simply a way to keep customers happy. Dropped calls result in unhappy customers regardless of the underlying reason.

Whether or not if your data is impacted will depend on your plan and how the wifi is setup.
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