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Old 06-21-2010, 07:19 AM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 54,228,997 times
Reputation: 14800

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Catawba Riverkeeper David Merryman says water samples taken near a
drainage pipe from a Duke Energy coal plant on Mountain Island Lake
contain high levels of arsenic. The lake is the major water supply for
Charlotte, Gastonia and Mount Holly.

Arsenic high in water sample near Duke plant - CharlotteObserver.com (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/06/19/1511024/arsenic-high-in-water-sample-near.html - broken link)
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Old 06-21-2010, 07:58 AM
 
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We had a topic on this before and I mentioned that I thought the poison was coming from the huge coal ash toxic dump that Duke maintains near that plant.

You can see it here. Notice how large it is compared to those expensive homes next to it.

Duke Thermal Plant Coal Ash Dump - Google Maps

There are two more of these plants on the Cawtaba system near Charlotte. One of them is on Lake Norman, the other is on the northern end of Lake Wylie. I don't remember which one, but one has been ranked as one of the 25 most polluting power plants in the USA. Duke has fought for decades to keep regulations off these plants. Here's to everyone's health!
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Old 06-21-2010, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Wouldn't you like to know?
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Anyone having flashbacks of the movie "Erin Brokovitch" w/this story??? Just substitute PG&E w/Duke Energy.....

Sad.....very sad....
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Old 06-21-2010, 12:28 PM
 
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There's an article about the guy in the June 10th issue of uptown magazine.
http://uptownclt.com/
Current issue to view is on the right at the bottom.It's page 50.

According to this, the EPA has 4 of the "local" ash piles on its list of 44 most hazardous coal ash ponds in the USA, 2 on Lake Norman, 1 on Lake Wylie and the one on Mountain Island Lake.

It also mentions that in 2008 the advocacy goup American Rivers named the Catawba the most endangered river in the USA because of rampant development and poor water management.

The ash ponds also contain lead and mercury.

The river keeper doesn't whole heartedly blame Duke but says about supply and demand too.

Solar panels anyone?
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Old 06-21-2010, 12:30 PM
 
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And yet we are not allowed to take our horses to the water anymore at Mountain Island Lake for fear of contamination....silly people....
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Old 06-21-2010, 12:48 PM
 
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Here's the list
Fact Sheet: Coal Combustion Residues (CCR) - Surface Impoundments with High Hazard Potential Ratings | Industrial Waste | US EPA

This is the site for the Catawba riverkeeper.
The Endangered River — Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation

Interesting, but sad and frightening too.
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Old 06-21-2010, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
234 posts, read 457,318 times
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Couple of things:

1. Taking the measurement right next to the discharge pipe is a pretty underhanded way to propagate fear. It'd be like dumping 3 tablespoons of sugar into a glass of water, NOT stirring it, and then measuring the sugar concentration at the bottom of the glass.

1a. You'll note in the article that arsenic concentrations further away from the discharge pipe are at acceptable levels.

2. To the poster who mentioned solar panels: The production of photovoltaic cells uses and produces lots of harsh chemicals, including hydrofluoric acid (which decalcifies bone). These chemicals also often find their way into water supplies. So, are you suggesting that solar panels are ok since their production poisons someone else's water supply?

2a. What do you do when the sun isn't shining? I'll tell you what you do, you rely on a fossil-fueled power plant to supply your energy. Doing this on a macro level requires fossil plants to "cycle," that is ramp up and down to respond to demand. Operating plants in this fashion not only reduces their efficiency, it also makes them more polluting. That's some serious irony right there - "green" power sources actually causing more pollution.
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Old 06-21-2010, 02:09 PM
 
4,010 posts, read 8,219,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DBGNCSU05 View Post
Couple of things:

1. Taking the measurement right next to the discharge pipe is a pretty underhanded way to propagate fear. It'd be like dumping 3 tablespoons of sugar into a glass of water, NOT stirring it, and then measuring the sugar concentration at the bottom of the glass......
Except that the party that is taking the measurement isn't the one dumping the sugar into the glass.

Duke's argument that one must take the water quality of the entire lake into account is what I would call underhanded, if that term has to be used, as it means it is OK for them to dump as much arsenic into the river as long as there is enough water to wash it away. This isn't a static lake, it's the Catawba river and anything that gets dumped into it, ends up in the Atlantic ocean.

There should be no dumping of arsenic and heavy metals into the water. The Riverkeepers are a volunteer, not well funded group, that don't have the resources to combat a big corporation. There may be something to their claims, there may not, but it should not be Duke that gets to decide it because it should be obvious which way they will go. The events surrounding BP are example enough of that.
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Old 06-21-2010, 02:37 PM
 
1,644 posts, read 3,830,020 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DBGNCSU05 View Post
Couple of things:

1. Taking the measurement right next to the discharge pipe is a pretty underhanded way to propagate fear. It'd be like dumping 3 tablespoons of sugar into a glass of water, NOT stirring it, and then measuring the sugar concentration at the bottom of the glass.

1a. You'll note in the article that arsenic concentrations further away from the discharge pipe are at acceptable levels.

2. To the poster who mentioned solar panels: The production of photovoltaic cells uses and produces lots of harsh chemicals, including hydrofluoric acid (which decalcifies bone). These chemicals also often find their way into water supplies. So, are you suggesting that solar panels are ok since their production poisons someone else's water supply?

2a. What do you do when the sun isn't shining? I'll tell you what you do, you rely on a fossil-fueled power plant to supply your energy. Doing this on a macro level requires fossil plants to "cycle," that is ramp up and down to respond to demand. Operating plants in this fashion not only reduces their efficiency, it also makes them more polluting. That's some serious irony right there - "green" power sources actually causing more pollution.
I personally don't think dumping ANY amount of arsenic or mercury or lead into the Catawba river basin is acceptable.

I was actually thinking about solar panels that directly heat water as an alternative to using a conventional water heater all the time .Yes you still need a back up, but it reduces demand and the conventional heater can be used to take the domestic hot water temperature up to a required temperature after the panels have heated it to a lower temperature even on a cloudy day.

As for the panels that generate electricity, you store unused electricity in a battery, or sell it to the power company.In parts of Europe the power companies pay you a higher rate for the electricity you generate than they charge to supply it.





Duke are dumping arsenic and lead and mercury into a system that supplies millions of people in the Charlotte area with water.
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Old 06-21-2010, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Wouldn't you like to know?
9,028 posts, read 14,398,907 times
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If the fish are contaminated w/PCB's (as the article suggests), then the toxins released are not stagnant obviously....

This is just another example (like GE did w/the PCB's in the hudson river that they polluted) of a company pushing the limits and not doing the right thing.......just my .02
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