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Old 07-05-2007, 09:29 AM
 
85 posts, read 191,454 times
Reputation: 38

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As a builder/developer let me clear some things up:
1) Veneer is a general term for a surface covering which is used to cover any substrate, which is beneath the veneer, for aesthtic/cosmetic purposes...examples would be cabinets, which are veneered with hardwoods such as maple or cherry because solid hardwoods we be VERY expensive(2x-3x)...a brick veneer is used to COVER the STICK-BUILT walls which constitute the actual framed structure...ALL of the homes you see with brick, whether just a front facade, or full brick veneer are indeed COVERING the stick-built walls...veneers are used for the aesthetics, not for structural purposes...if a wall for a home were to be built of brick, it would require two wythes(two separate vertical components) to be considered a code-compliant wall for structural purposes..VERY expensive, as you would imagine...so in conclusion virtually EVERY home built utilizes stick-built framing(typically platform construction)) and some sort of veneer be it vinyl, hardboard, brick, stone or block.
2) The veneer will contribute very little to the overall thermal efficiency of your home...this is accomplished with proper insulation techniques, which are REQUIRED by the building code, roof overhangs blocking direct sunlight, and window glazing treatments which minimize sunlight penetration(and UV rays)...in fact, the thermal mass of solid materials such as brick, stone and block/ concrete will retain heat for considerably longer periods after sunset.
3) Your house is as strong as the weakest structural member/connection...which is typically the roof connection to the framed walls top plate(s)..again, code requires hurricane clips and strapping to be utilized at roof connections...tornadoes and hurricanes do most damage from flying debris and pressure differences which a brick wall has nothing to do with...my best advice in to ENSURE your home is wrapped FULLY with structural sheathing(OSB or plywood) and nailed off properly...this ensures maximum diaphragm action making all of the structural components work as one system...be aware the code DOES NOT require full wrap, only stiffening of the corners for shear/racking resistance...most large builders do not use full-wrap in order to save a couple of dollars per house by substituting bead board or feltbaord...personally I NEVER build my houses without full sheathing wrap...just isn't smart business.
4) as would be expected, the labor-intensive nature of installing brick or stone veneering costs more in both materials and labor, but IMHO is worth the added value it brings to the house...both tax and real estate appraisals recognize these values...whether a potential client will, is anyone's guessLOL...in essence it costs more to install and to buy, so it will increae the value of the home compared to an equal home utilizing vinyl...hardboard is close in value to brick...stone is the most expensive.

Hope this helps clear up some confusion...any Q's fell free to drop a line.
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Old 07-06-2007, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Concord, NC
367 posts, read 692,208 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
I think this is might be what they are referring to
Exactly that is a Brick Veneer, brick on one side. It is still real brick though
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Old 07-06-2007, 02:28 PM
 
28 posts, read 98,555 times
Reputation: 14
brick to me = more stable as far storms and bad weather..... and less painting
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Old 07-06-2007, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Concord, NC
367 posts, read 692,208 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorbuilt28036 View Post
As a builder/developer let me clear some things up:
1) Veneer is a general term for a surface covering which is used to cover any substrate, which is beneath the veneer, for aesthtic/cosmetic purposes...examples would be cabinets, which are veneered with hardwoods such as maple or cherry because solid hardwoods we be VERY expensive(2x-3x)...a brick veneer is used to COVER the STICK-BUILT walls which constitute the actual framed structure...ALL of the homes you see with brick, whether just a front facade, or full brick veneer are indeed COVERING the stick-built walls...veneers are used for the aesthetics, not for structural purposes...if a wall for a home were to be built of brick, it would require two wythes(two separate vertical components) to be considered a code-compliant wall for structural purposes..VERY expensive, as you would imagine...so in conclusion virtually EVERY home built utilizes stick-built framing(typically platform construction)) and some sort of veneer be it vinyl, hardboard, brick, stone or block.
2) The veneer will contribute very little to the overall thermal efficiency of your home...this is accomplished with proper insulation techniques, which are REQUIRED by the building code, roof overhangs blocking direct sunlight, and window glazing treatments which minimize sunlight penetration(and UV rays)...in fact, the thermal mass of solid materials such as brick, stone and block/ concrete will retain heat for considerably longer periods after sunset.
3) Your house is as strong as the weakest structural member/connection...which is typically the roof connection to the framed walls top plate(s)..again, code requires hurricane clips and strapping to be utilized at roof connections...tornadoes and hurricanes do most damage from flying debris and pressure differences which a brick wall has nothing to do with...my best advice in to ENSURE your home is wrapped FULLY with structural sheathing(OSB or plywood) and nailed off properly...this ensures maximum diaphragm action making all of the structural components work as one system...be aware the code DOES NOT require full wrap, only stiffening of the corners for shear/racking resistance...most large builders do not use full-wrap in order to save a couple of dollars per house by substituting bead board or feltbaord...personally I NEVER build my houses without full sheathing wrap...just isn't smart business.
4) as would be expected, the labor-intensive nature of installing brick or stone veneering costs more in both materials and labor, but IMHO is worth the added value it brings to the house...both tax and real estate appraisals recognize these values...whether a potential client will, is anyone's guessLOL...in essence it costs more to install and to buy, so it will increae the value of the home compared to an equal home utilizing vinyl...hardboard is close in value to brick...stone is the most expensive.

Hope this helps clear up some confusion...any Q's fell free to drop a line.
Thanks, that was a very good read
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Old 07-06-2007, 04:57 PM
 
Location: NC
60 posts, read 205,443 times
Reputation: 36
Hey Gator...

Thanks for clearing it up for everyone! That was so informative.

Nicole
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:18 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,805 times
Reputation: 11
Default Brick veneer

Brick veneer means Brick. I know it is confusing. But if you see a house listed as full brick veneer -- that means it is a full brick house. If the house is only brick on the front, it will say partial brick veneer. Hope this helps.
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
3,237 posts, read 6,128,470 times
Reputation: 1808
Interesting reading this:-

I want to add to what gatorbuilt28036 said.

If a house is framed (sticks) then a brick covering put over it, it is just that a cover.

I used to live in an all brick house that was build in the 1910's there was two full layers of brick in every wall of the house, do not think any builder below 500K would do that here.
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Old 07-19-2007, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Dilworth - Charlotte, NC.
549 posts, read 1,683,134 times
Reputation: 236
I have been also been curious to know if there are still any home builders in Charlotte who build homes with the old brick and mortar system. Even in the higher-end section many of the costum homes being built in Charlotte are framing them the same way they would a smaller tract home. The difference is the house is embellished with more expensive surfacing materials such as hardwood, stone, tile, expensive appliances and trendy technology. Developers are savvy to name subdivisions with aristocratic references, particularly that of the British peerage system. Names like "Highgrove", "Knightsbridge", and "Kensington" have been used to give the subdivision located in South Charlotte a poshie aura. The Townhomes for example were originally called a town in home. Once the exclusive domain of the upper-class. Polite society would leave their country estates and head to their home in the city for the "social season" starting in the fall to the early spring. They would leave the city during the summer to avoid the epidemics that were common during the summer months. The season was when most of the new art exhibitions were unveiled, charity events, cotillions, dinner parties and balls were held one after the other.

Always found the 19th century RowHouses in Boston, Baltimore/DC Philadelphia and NY(called Brownstones there) to be very desirable. Maybe I am attracted to the patina the stone and brick gets when it is over a hundred years. Also those homes have so much detail but it does not feel overbearing to me. The fine hardwood floors, 12+ high ceilings, symetry of the floorplan, it's inner courtyards with its complicated placed tile work, and the impressive spaciousness of the grand drawing rooms makes want to live in one again. Charlotte in the 19th century had it's share of similar structures built at the time. Like most of the old buildings in the center city they were razed.
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Old 08-12-2007, 07:01 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,710 times
Reputation: 10
Brick veneer has 2 by 4 or 2 by 6 walls most of the time on the inside which you can insulate. A brick wall does not have much r value(r-3 about). So a all brick house may be more expensive to heat (older homes). Even if the house is 3 bricks thick it may only be r value of 9 If you are looking for more answers just google it instead of relying on others who half of them are just guessing
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Old 08-12-2007, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
185 posts, read 421,280 times
Reputation: 63
BRICK FACED FRONT BRICK FACED FRONT BRICK FACED FRONT,
go'head...... say it three times fast!
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